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rouse oneself/ rise to one’s feet Options
vil
Posted: Sunday, June 26, 2011 12:00:35 PM
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Location: Bulgaria
Would you be kind enough to give me your considered opinion concerning my interpretation of the expressions in bold in the following sentence?

He roused himself unwillingly from his thoughts upon the past experiences and rose to his feet.

rouse oneself = to come out of a state of sleep, reverie, unconsciousness, inactivity, apathy

rouse oneself from ones thoughts = tear oneself away from one’s thoughts

rise to one’s feet = “stand” or “stand up”
mr.sv
Posted: Sunday, June 26, 2011 1:07:52 PM
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Joined: 5/30/2011
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Location: India
He roused himself unwillingly from his thoughts upon the past experiences and rose to his feet.
I think the crux of the above expression is the subject has regained the capacity for sensory perception.
We can understand the expression in two pieces:
1. roused himself unwillingly from his thoughts : the subject comes out of his dreams(or thoughts).
2. rose to his feet: He regains his conscious control here.
excaelis
Posted: Sunday, June 26, 2011 1:10:23 PM

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That seems right, vil. The first is mental the second physical.
intelfam
Posted: Sunday, June 26, 2011 1:37:22 PM
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excaelis wrote:
That seems right, vil. The first is mental the second physical.


Seconded ex
Can I ask vil, are you perhaps thinking that "rouse" and rose are parts of the same verb? Cos they ain't. As has been said, "rouse" per TFD:

rouse (rouz)
v. roused, rous·ing, rous·es
v.tr.
1. To arouse from slumber, apathy, or depression.
2. To excite, as to anger or action; stir up. See Synonyms at provoke.
v.intr.
1. To awaken.
2. To become active.
n.
The act or an instance of arousing.
vil
Posted: Sunday, June 26, 2011 4:10:19 PM
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Joined: 9/8/2010
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Location: Bulgaria
Hi intelfam,

If you keep a close watch on my original post you will ascertain the fact that your question is expendable.

rouse (roused; rousing) Etymology: Middle English, to shake the feathers Date: 1531 transitive verb 1. archaic to cause to break from cover 2. a. to stir up ; excite

He wants rousing.
He is terrifying when he is roused.
Morpheus rouses from his bed.
He's going to rouse himself
The speaker tried to rouse the crowd to excitement.
I was roused by the ringing of the bell.


rouse = to be exited to thought or action from a state of indolence or inattention

rouse oneself = to come out of a state of sleep, reverie, unconsciousness, inactivity, apathy

rise

The children have been taught to rise above selfish considerations.
A man seated in an office is not expected to rise when a woman speaks to him.
A picture rises before her mind.
The river flood had risen two feet.
Smoke could be seen rising from the chimney.
Fear rose up in their hearts as the enemy came near.
The company has risen above its early problems, and is now doing well.
The citizens rose against their rulers and took power themselves.
Parliament will rise next week.
The greatest leader of the nation rose from humble origins.
The river rises in the hills.
The people saw the great church rise from the ashes of the original one.
Jesus rose from the dead.
His gorge/stomach rises.

rise to one’s feet = “stand” or “stand up”

http://www.answers.com/rise?afid=TBarLookup&nafid=27

V.
intelfam
Posted: Sunday, June 26, 2011 4:57:56 PM
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I am aroused, and stand corrected. BTW I think it might be superfluous/redundant rather than expendable, but I am sure you will come down on me like a ton of bricks. Have a nice day.
intelfam
Posted: Sunday, June 26, 2011 4:57:57 PM
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Joined: 1/18/2010
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I am aroused, and stand corrected. BTW I think it might be superfluous/redundant rather than expendable, but I am sure you will come down on me like a ton of bricks. Have a nice day.
vil
Posted: Monday, June 27, 2011 2:08:41 AM
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Location: Bulgaria
It’s a good horse that never stumble.

expendable = not strictly necessary; dispensable

redundant = superfluous, surplus, unnecessary

V.
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