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jeans&sneakers
Posted: Monday, June 13, 2011 5:15:34 PM
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Hi all. I was chatting with a guy the other day; someone I've known for few months now and he said "i wish im with u".... LOL. He's kinda weird but I chat with him because I wanna improve my English. Anyway, I thought when you use the word "wish" in a sentence, the verb following it should be in past tense? Like, I WISH I COULD fly etc. Denoting far possibility. He's a native English speaker, so, I just wonder Eh? .... Or does it depend on the usage?

Help please.

Thanks.
thar
Posted: Monday, June 13, 2011 5:22:20 PM

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txting nds flxible lnguij- im easier to txt than iwr!

you would normally say wish I were (or, commonly but 'wrongly' I wish I was). I wish I am sounds wrong, you would never say it, under any usage.

However, you might end up texting it because it is short, and it did get the meaning across, because you understood it, so it did the job!
jeans&sneakers
Posted: Monday, June 13, 2011 5:45:36 PM
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Because when I asked him, he said "only if ur talking about the past" lol

But ok, thank you Thar!
thar
Posted: Monday, June 13, 2011 6:00:50 PM

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the were in I wish I were, is the present conditional, not the past, which is why you never use the normal present after wish. As a native speaker I am sure he never says I wish I am!
blahblah
Posted: Tuesday, June 14, 2011 12:37:25 AM
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Joined: 11/26/2010
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Location: United States
"Chatting" face to face or online?

If online, maybe he's not a native English speaker?
jeans&sneakers
Posted: Tuesday, June 14, 2011 3:24:27 AM
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Location: Cavite, Calabarzon, Philippines
blahblah wrote:
"Chatting" face to face or online?

If online, maybe he's not a native English speaker?



It's online. He's from Canada, I'm in Asia. We've seen each other's faces a few times although we haven't tried Voice chat (which I actually prefer to get used to speaking/thinking in English). I need it for job employment and for personal development as well. Well I think he's really a native English speaker... only with that sentence.... And I don't know why he said that - got me a little confused. But anyway, he can't confuse me anymore since we already stopped chatting, lol.

Thanks for the replies!
musa
Posted: Tuesday, June 14, 2011 3:34:02 AM
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Joined: 6/14/2011
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Location: Sudan
Hi, try to chat with other person!
LOOOOOOOOOOOOOOL
jeans&sneakers
Posted: Tuesday, June 14, 2011 3:52:41 AM
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Location: Cavite, Calabarzon, Philippines
musa wrote:
Hi, try to chat with other person!
LOOOOOOOOOOOOOOL


I have a few from other countries. But I like someone who can really help me with the language. Friends/Chat is fine, but no lovey dovey, lol. I already tried Livemocha but hasn't found anyone I can practice English with. Unfortunately, seems like most of them prefer to learn Spanish, French or Japanese. And I can only teach Tagalog :(
Seth
Posted: Tuesday, June 14, 2011 4:14:30 AM
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Location: Japan
Okay it's wrong grammatically and blah and blah and blah ... BUT !!! English isn't a language fixed with rules like French.
So People mostly say " I wish I could, I wish I were" in Britain and such, but in America, it's quite free depending on how many people actually use it + the whole bunch of immigrants that never learned English correctly and crammed their language in.

Exemple: I wish I could be with you / I wish to be with you / I wish (that right now) I am with you. The last one just stems from a trend that young people have, of "skipping" the mark of the subordinate clause. (he told me THAT he wished to be with me).

In Japanese they have an interesting way to act on subordinate clauses, using the verb say (He wished to be with me \that thing said\ he told me) basic translation, maybe that help you to understand the "That" a little better.
jeans&sneakers
Posted: Tuesday, June 14, 2011 4:33:30 AM
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Hi Seth,

I see your point in your example. I asked because I wanna know if what I know is correct or not. Thanks and cheers! :D
Yuzu-ma
Posted: Tuesday, June 14, 2011 4:48:07 AM
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I see. jeans&sneakers
We are in the same situation. You probably add Chinese in that list.
However, I am trying to practice by myself and looking for some kind native people supporting me
after I worked hard instead. If my English is great enough, I really want to help you.
ighat. :-)
jeans&sneakers
Posted: Wednesday, June 15, 2011 2:39:55 AM
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Yep, and Chinese.... And thank you so much for your kind comment, neighbor! :p

I believe you meant "ingat"... you too! Angel
blue2
Posted: Wednesday, June 15, 2011 5:20:13 AM

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Location: Préveza, Epirus, Greece
Well, I'm a Canadian native English speaker and I would never ever say "I wish I'm...". It is just plain wrong.

I wish to xx is acceptable as a demand. I wish to see the manager.

When you are making a wish about the present, you still need the past tense, which is then called the "unreal past".

I'd also like to mention that "native speakers" is a very broad category. There are native speakers who really don't have that intrinsic feel for the language that others do. For example, if someone was taken to an English speaking country at a very young age and went to school in that country, they would be considered a native speaker. However, if the language they had heard from birth, and in their home and family life has always been another language, it is quite possible their linguistic abilities in English may not be as good as someone brought up in a completely English speaking environment.

I know this well from personal experience.
sisikou
Posted: Wednesday, June 15, 2011 10:00:21 AM
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Agree with blue2, 4-5 years old is a critical period for children's phonology development(i.e., if you want to speak a native like accent, better acquire it before 5).
___________________________________________________________________________
Regarding the usage of wish, I found a paragraph which compares wish & hope:

To hope is to want something that is possible and likely to happen.

To wish is to want something that is impossible or unlikely. Wish is used with past tenses when talking about what is unlikely or impossible.

So, if you're inviting a girl to your party, you should say, "I hope you can come."

But, if she tells you she will be out of the country at that time, so it's impossible to come, you can show you're disappointed by saying, "I wish you could come." We never say "I wish you can come.
Reference from: http://tw.knowledge.yahoo.com/question/question?qid=1008051909282

Jeans, could it be a "slip of the tongue"?
Vickster
Posted: Wednesday, June 15, 2011 10:55:18 AM
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He's kinda weird but I chat with him because I wanna improve my English.

For one, you should stop texting. Texting is probably one of the worse things you can do if you want to learn English. Just reading your sentence you've shown us how you've picked up on slang instead of correct English grammar.

kinda.... kind of
wanna... want to

If you want to learn... learn from someone who can help you...not make it worse. IMO
sisikou
Posted: Wednesday, June 15, 2011 11:55:58 AM
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Joined: 5/2/2011
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Location: Taiwan
Quote:
learn from someone who can help you


The ones could be those with the same language ability like you do(peer learning), or ones who are better than you in English.
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, June 15, 2011 10:22:29 PM
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jeans&sneakers -

as Vickster said - being a native speaker doesn't mean a person speaks correct English. If you stay on this forum you'll see lots of thread where people are asking/complaining about the horrible English that is spoken all round us: "I seen him" "I didn't do nothing" etc.

Also: spoken English varies a lot from written English but often text or message speakers are not terribly literate or educated and try to write the way they speak - horribly confusing for English learners.

Slang is a terribly difficult concept to grasp in any language so it's better to have a thorough grounding in a language first before one ventures into those realms. Reading (books, articles on the Net or in newspapers and magazines, ebooks, etc.) is the next best thing if one hasn't people around with whom to practice. Or - logging on to forums such as this where people really care about language, of course!
kitten
Posted: Wednesday, June 15, 2011 11:25:51 PM
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Joined: 12/28/2009
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Location: the city by the bay
musa wrote:
Hi, try to chat with other person!
LOOOOOOOOOOOOOOL





[image not available]
blue2
Posted: Thursday, June 16, 2011 1:31:20 AM

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[quote=Romany]jeans&sneakers -

as Vickster said - being a native speaker doesn't mean a person speaks correct English.

Actually, I said that. Whistle

But I would like to say that what Vickster and Romany say about text language and slang is very important.

Text language is not the way to go if you want to learn English. What you learn will be ungrammatical at a very low level, showing poor English skills.

I hope you decide to stay with us.
jeans&sneakers
Posted: Thursday, June 16, 2011 2:29:33 AM
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Joined: 6/13/2011
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Location: Cavite, Calabarzon, Philippines
Quote:
Vickster:
"He's kinda weird but I chat with him because I wanna improve my English."


Reading this, that I originally posted, posted by someone else suddenly gave me a different impression this time - like I used and back-stabbed him! Anxious Anyway I just woke up (and I feel weird O_o).

blue2, I will definitely visit this room as frequent as I can. I'm glad to have found this website; I didn't know this has a forum.

I am not much of a reader but I'll try. I know it's essential for learning, hehe :p

Thank you ALL for the feedback and suggestions! I really appreciate it.
ludic
Posted: Thursday, June 16, 2011 3:03:12 AM

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It's been pointed out again and again that the verb following 'wish' is to be in the past tense. What about when our wish is for something in the future?


Is the sentence in bold wrong? :

[Genie: Make a wish.]

Me: I wish ten years from now I own a palatial house.

What should be the correct structure of my answer to the Genie? :)
Yuzu-ma
Posted: Thursday, June 16, 2011 5:22:39 AM
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Joined: 2/15/2011
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ingat??
I thought ighat :P I don't know the way to spell this word. just learnt from my fillipino friends.
I just realize that I should note a defination of word which is not international language here.
I didn't mean to be impolite. I am sorry.
To those of who might want to know
ingat means take care.

Jeans actually I wonder one, you know tagalog. I assume you are fillipino, aren't you?
I think fillipino are good at in English, aren't they?
Don't misunderstand me why I pick up that point.
I just want to focus on that you have many chances to practice English.
Maybe with them even though they have a thick accent.
And don't mind about that and don't feel ashame about it. To me I think a thick accent is like a individual charm.
(I might think wrongly though but think positive.)
As I know fillipino are very nice. You can ask for them to help your English and you'll find nice
friends and tutors in the same time as I was.
Just my opinion.

I come across searching this video for you.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RL0LJ_1NjuE
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EN8L2ifxdW8&NR=1&feature=fvwp

don't ask me if it's correct. I'm not sure too. :P
I just sit and watch her teach after found them for you.


IMcRout
Posted: Thursday, June 16, 2011 7:59:10 AM
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@ludic I wish I knew exactly. My suggestion:

I wish I'd (=I would) own a palatial home ten years from now.

(I would certainly put the adverbial of time at the end of the sentence.)
Feeble Dragonfly
Posted: Thursday, June 16, 2011 8:37:13 AM
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Joined: 2/10/2011
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@ludic I don't think the senetence you have used is correct. Neither do I agree with our German friend -that sentence doesn't read quite right to me either.

I would recommend something along the lines of 'I wish to own a palatial home ten years from now', or 'it is my wish to own etc etc..'

However, I personally probably wouldn't use wish, but rather 'hope to own' or 'dream of owning', which are phrases that have varying levels of possibility in them.
blue2
Posted: Thursday, June 16, 2011 10:50:40 AM

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Location: Préveza, Epirus, Greece
FD is right. You normally wouldn't use "wish" for the future.

Mind you, you've given us a different use of "wish". You could also use "wish for", or "I wish could have..."

IMcRout
Posted: Thursday, June 16, 2011 11:18:02 AM
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Location: Lübeck, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany
I mean, how do you address a genie? If you rub her/him wrong(ly?), you might be in for it.
And who needs palatial homes anyway? So there!
Think I'll withdraw into my lamp, sorry, kitchen and prepare dinner.
Blooper
Posted: Thursday, June 16, 2011 10:23:54 PM
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Joined: 10/4/2010
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Location: South Borneo
Hello jeans&sneakers...
I apologise, the first time I saw your username I thought you're an online merchant from China..
Brick wall
excaelis
Posted: Thursday, June 16, 2011 10:47:35 PM

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The ighat/ingat example is instructive here. Obviously this a word that is spelt ( and probably formally pronounced ) one way, yet is commonly pronounced quite differently in everyday speech..
jeans&sneakers
Posted: Thursday, June 16, 2011 11:58:33 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/13/2011
Posts: 2,722
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Location: Cavite, Calabarzon, Philippines
ploy_angjoe wrote:

I come across searching this video for you.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RL0LJ_1NjuE
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EN8L2ifxdW8&NR=1&feature=fvwp

don't ask me if it's correct. I'm not sure too. :P
I just sit and watch her teach after found them for you.


Hi Ploy, you're a gem! Thank you for the links. One of the links, 2nd one I guess, explains ludic's question about using "wish" for something in the future. Just like what Feeble explained. The feedback are very helpful. And yes, I'm a Filipino. Is that how your Filipino friends pronounce "ingat"? excaelis, it is spelt and pronounced the same way (hope that's correct). Like this: "ing" + "at"... but "at" being pronounced like how you pronounce "slot".


@ Blooper, is jeans&sneakers a brand in China? But it's ok. I just love jeans and sneakers so I used it as my SC.
Blooper
Posted: Friday, June 17, 2011 12:04:43 AM
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I am just kidding j&s
That's a cool username. I wish I could change mine without re-registering.
Blooper
Posted: Tuesday, July 26, 2011 11:23:45 PM
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What about wish in wish me luck or wish you luck?
jeans&sneakers
Posted: Wednesday, July 27, 2011 3:33:55 AM
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Location: Cavite, Calabarzon, Philippines
Blooper wrote:
What about wish in wish me luck or wish you luck?


Uhm, I'm not sure what you mean. You kidding yet again?

[image not available]


[image not available]


I guess I'll just wish you luck in your endeavors! All the best. *high five*



Blooper
Posted: Wednesday, July 27, 2011 7:23:17 AM
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Wish someone luck doesn't mean we expect he/she doesn't get the luck, does it?
jeans&sneakers
Posted: Thursday, July 28, 2011 2:15:30 AM
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Joined: 6/13/2011
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Location: Cavite, Calabarzon, Philippines
Blooper wrote:
Wish someone luck doesn't mean we expect he/she doesn't get the luck, does it?


Hi Blooper,

Maybe if it's meant as a sarcasm? You have to be aware of the situation and the tone of voice of the speaker. But wishing someone luck (like what I said to you) usually means you wish someone well. IMO :)


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