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History fades into fable; fact becomes clouded with doubt and controversy; the inscription molders from the tablet; the... Options
Daemon
Posted: Saturday, June 4, 2011 12:00:00 AM
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History fades into fable; fact becomes clouded with doubt and controversy; the inscription molders from the tablet; the statue falls from the pedestal. Columns, arches, pyramids, what are they but heaps of sand—and their epitaphs, but characters written in the dust?

Washington Irving (1783-1859)
1dreamer
Posted: Saturday, June 4, 2011 4:47:12 AM
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"Shamans" create fables and history (through true art), not Irving or Flaubert. They just are some who used their brains to think about what happened or make money, nothing beyond. God knows that and that´s why he only talks to angels. I think the Farlex Daemon knows it too, right?
DHeavyOne
Posted: Saturday, June 4, 2011 8:07:14 AM
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Such a cheery quote this morning. It almost makes me want to shout out the front door "Good morning, World! I'm UP now...."....he he he...

God convenes with angels because his real estate is too expensive. Nobody here as figured out how to buy any, yet....and not through any lack of effort.

....but, as always, that's just MY opinion....he he he.
MTC
Posted: Saturday, June 4, 2011 8:17:19 AM
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Compare Shelley's famous poem, Ozymandias, contemporaneous with Irving's quotation:

"I met a traveller from an antique land
Who said: "Two vast and trunkless legs of stone
Stand in the desert. Near them on the sand,
Half sunk, a shattered visage lies, whose frown
And wrinkled lip and sneer of cold command
Tell that its sculptor well those passions read
Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things,
The hand that mocked them and the heart that fed.
And on the pedestal these words appear:
`My name is Ozymandias, King of Kings:
Look on my works, ye mighty, and despair!"
Nothing beside remains. Round the decay
Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare,
The lone and level sands stretch far away".
jcbarros
Posted: Saturday, June 4, 2011 10:44:27 AM

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Glory fades. (Sic transit gloria mundi) Pray
excaelis
Posted: Saturday, June 4, 2011 1:31:34 PM

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jcbarros wrote:
Glory fades. (Sic transit gloria mundi) Pray


As does beauty. ( Sic transit Gloria Swanson )
jcbarros
Posted: Saturday, June 4, 2011 3:30:18 PM

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Well said Ex Dancing
kitten
Posted: Saturday, June 4, 2011 5:05:48 PM
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Daemon wrote:
History fades into fable; fact becomes clouded with doubt and controversy; the inscription molders from the tablet; the statue falls from the pedestal. Columns, arches, pyramids, what are they but heaps of sand—and their epitaphs, but characters written in the dust? Washington Irving (1783-1859)



The above quote comes from a collection of short stories, THE CRAYON PAPERS
by GEOFFREY CRAYON, GENT. This quote is in, "Westminster Abbey." It is in the last part as he is leaving, Westminister Abbey, and he is reflecting on his thoughts and what he experienced.



I endeavored to form some arrangement in my mind of the objects I had been contemplating, but found they were already falling into indistinctness and confusion. Names, inscriptions, trophies, had all become confounded in my recollection, though I had scarcely taken my foot from off the threshold. What, thought I, is this vast assemblage of sepulchres but a treasury of humiliation--a huge pile of reiterated homilies on the emptiness of renown and the certainty of oblivion? It is, indeed, the empire of death; his great shadowy palace where he sits in state mocking at the relics of human glory and spreading dust and forgetfulness on the monuments of princes. How idle a boast, after all, is the immortality of a name! Time is ever silently turning over his pages; we are too much engrossed by the story of the present to think of the characters and anecdotes that gave interest to the past; and each age is a volume thrown aside to be speedily forgotten. The idol of to-day pushes the hero of yesterday out of our recollection, and will in turn be supplanted by his successor of tomorrow. "Our fathers," says Sir Thomas Browne, "find their graves in our short memories, and sadly tell us how we may be buried in our survivors." History fades into fable; fact becomes clouded with doubt and controversy; the inscription moulders from the tablet; the statue falls from the pedestal. Columns, arches, pyramids, what are they but heaps of sand, and their epitaphs but characters written in the dust? What is the security of a tomb or the perpetuity of an embalmment? The remains of Alexander the Great have been scattered to the wind, and his empty sarcophagus is now the mere curiosity of a museum. "The Egyptian mummies, which Cambyses or time hath spared, avarice now consumeth; Mizraim cures wounds, and Pharaoh is sold for balsams."*

What then is to ensure this pile which now towers above me from sharing the fate of mightier mausoleums? The time must come when its gilded vaults which now spring so loftily, shall lie in rubbish beneath the feet; when instead of the sound of melody and praise the wind shall whistle through the broken arches and the owl hoot from the shattered tower; when the garish sunbeam shall break into these gloomy mansions of death, and the ivy twine round the fallen column; and the fox-glove hang its blossoms about the nameless urn, as if in mockery of the dead. Thus man passes away; his name passes from record and recollection; his history is as a tale that is told, and his very monument becomes a ruin.

Sir T. Browne.



The Sketchbook of Geoffrey Crayon by Washington Irving <<<<< Please excuse all the ads but also please thank >>>>> www.readprint.com for the complete works.


peace out, >^,,^<
floyd
Posted: Saturday, June 4, 2011 5:23:04 PM
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That Irv can surely make a person feel tired! Of course history fades, and of course fact becomes clouded with doubt.

For that matter, our views of right now are no models of clarity. Why? Because limited perspectives and conflicting emotions leave us with clouds even in this moment, and the fading starts in the next.

With my 70th birthday coming soon, I'm just not buying Irv's cynicism. After all, the fading and clouding can't keep us from treasuring beauty and learning wisdom, can it?

Be of good cheer.

javascript:insertsmiley('Anxious%20','/images/emoticons/eusa_shifty.gif')
excaelis
Posted: Saturday, June 4, 2011 5:47:37 PM

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Golden lads and girls all must,
Like chimney-sweepers, come to dust.


WS, Cymbeline, act 4 sc. 2, ll.263-264.

Men's evil manners live in brass; their virtues we write in water.

WS, Henry VIII, act 4 sc. 2, l.45
kitten
Posted: Saturday, June 4, 2011 5:57:00 PM
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excaelis wrote:
Golden lads and girls all must,
Like chimney-sweepers, come to dust.


WS, Cymbeline, act 4 sc. 2, ll.263-264.

Men's evil manners live in brass; their virtues we write in water.

WS, Henry VIII, act 4 sc. 2, l.45



Thanks, ex---->^,,^<----loves WS.
MTC
Posted: Saturday, June 4, 2011 7:28:57 PM
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I'm with floyd. For some the glass will always be half-empty.
DarkMoon
Posted: Sunday, June 5, 2011 11:31:23 AM

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excaelis wrote:
Men's evil manners live in brass; their virtues we write in water.
WS, Henry VIII, act 4 sc. 2, l.45


My mother uses the saying that a good man can be heard of far away, but an evil man even further.



sisikou
Posted: Sunday, June 5, 2011 9:45:25 PM
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very evil.
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