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Tornado in Massachusetts Options
Vickster
Posted: Thursday, June 2, 2011 8:13:07 AM
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Joined: 2/19/2010
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Location: Massachusetts, United States
http://abcnews.go.com/US/tornadoes-tear-massachestts-dead-dozens-injured/story?id=13740310


I'm used to thunder and lightning,heavy rainfall,blizzards,hurricanes, even golf-sized hail...but never tornados. Yesterday was pretty scary for me... My parents so close to the tornados..I'm glad they're ok... but the lightning afterwards was something hard to put in words... striking almost every 2-3 seconds directly overhead...lasting over an hour...
richsap
Posted: Thursday, June 2, 2011 9:41:30 AM
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Joined: 7/16/2010
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Welcome to the world of the southern U.S. They (tornadoes) happen so frequently in the spring here that unless there is massive destruction it isn't really newsworthy.

My ex lives on the border of MA and I was watching the news footage to see if I could spot her flying by on her broom. No such luck.

Whistle
Wanderer
Posted: Thursday, June 2, 2011 10:46:54 AM

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Vickster, you were the first one I thought of as I heard the morning news. Glad to hear you and the guys are okay. Did the storm beat down your garden?
Vickster
Posted: Thursday, June 2, 2011 2:07:16 PM
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Joined: 2/19/2010
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Location: Massachusetts, United States
Thankfully I haven't rotatiled my garden yet so I took all my plants inside before it all happened... Thank you for your concern...

I don't know how people from other parts of the US deal with tornados... they are wicked!!
lemonk
Posted: Thursday, June 2, 2011 2:53:42 PM
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Location: United States
Hi Vickster - Glad you are ok!

lemonk
Posted: Thursday, June 2, 2011 2:54:00 PM
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Location: United States
richsap wrote:
My ex lives on the border of MA and I was watching the news footage to see if I could spot her flying by on her broom. No such luck.

Whistle


HA!!!
dangeralert
Posted: Thursday, June 2, 2011 3:23:12 PM
Rank: Member

Joined: 5/6/2011
Posts: 62
Neurons: 179
Location: United States
Vickster wrote:
Thankfully I haven't rotatiled my garden yet so I took all my plants inside before it all happened... Thank you for your concern...

I don't know how people from other parts of the US deal with tornados... they are wicked!!


Forgive me if I sound ignorant or if this comes across the wrong way, but I think people in other parts of the US don't have as big a problem with tornados as those in Massachusetts. I say this solely because in the Midwest, tornados are a common sight year after year. The land is flat, which unfortunately allows tornados to travel longer. There is much more land area in the Midwest than New England, so buildings are spaced further apart. Some people may think the tornado in Massachusetts isn't such a big deal, but for a region of the country that is not built for or used to withstanding tornadoes, it is much more serious than in the Midwest.
RuthP
Posted: Thursday, June 2, 2011 3:46:40 PM

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Location: Drain, Oregon, United States
Vickster,

Glad to hear you are OK. Tornadoes actually are close to a phobia with me. We, too, here in the PNW have had a couple of tornadoes this spring, something usually very, very rare.

dangeralert has some good points. Really, there is nothing to do with tornadoes but have a safe room, and the expense of that is such that one is unlikely to be available outside of areas with frequent tornadoes.

Inside rooms, away from doors and windows, especially if the door can be closed and locked. The basement, especially if the door to the basement can be bolted shut: again, get as far inside and away from glass. Preferably something tied to the ground (sturdy plumbing pipe?) to hold on to: a couple of people in Joplin mentioned clutching a toilet. Blankets to cover yourself from flying glass (which will disappear in the wind if you really have a direct hit, but one hopes the glass will be largely gone by then).

In tornado land, safe structures are usually done in one of two ways:

An interior, windowless room of poured, reinforced concrete with triple-deadbolts on the door.

A below-ground safe room, which is often pre-fabricated steel, again with a door which triple-bolts and is flat to the ground. These are more expensive, but they are required in some states in new apartment buildings and public buildings.
srirr
Posted: Friday, June 3, 2011 12:41:58 AM

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Its good to hear from you Vicki that you are safe and so are your kins. Take care.

We have been hearing this in the news. Some of the pics are really shaking us.
sisikou
Posted: Friday, June 3, 2011 3:25:05 AM
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Location: Taiwan
Vickster, glad that everything is fine. Take care! May God bless you!
Epiphileon
Posted: Friday, June 3, 2011 5:27:01 AM

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Glad to hear you're o.k. Vic, we watched the the weather with no small trepidation, although our area was under a warning for a bit, all we saw was quarter sized hail for a few minutes. I sure hope this is not a trend developing, the scariest thing about tornadoes in N.E. is that you can't see them coming, and usually get only 10 minutes or less warning.
Vickster
Posted: Friday, June 3, 2011 8:09:42 AM
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Joined: 2/19/2010
Posts: 2,404
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Location: Massachusetts, United States
exactly!! 10 minutes!! Most houses don't have a basement...not one created for tornadoes!! My basement is half underground half above ground.. built around 1896.. with rock walls and dirt. The other half, since my land slopes is above ground with windows and cement, up-dated for comfortable living...no bolted doors... and all I could think of is where is the safest place to be so if the house collapsed, we wouldn't get crushed by the funiture/etc above us... I wasn't thinking about blow out windows/doors... grabbing onto the pipes..

What really got me is the Mother who saved her 15 year old daughter by throwing her into the tub and laying on top of her.... the mother died by the falling debris..but saved her daughters life!! She is a hero to me... beautiful display of pure love and concern for her daughter... We should here more about that than the awful stories of how mothers kill their young... She should be honored for giving her life to protect what she held most dear to her!!!
srirr
Posted: Monday, June 6, 2011 2:27:36 AM

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Vicki, all the praises for the mother who sacrificed herself for her daughter. She is the hero.
In our life, we love someone more than our lives.
Cruithne1990
Posted: Tuesday, June 14, 2011 3:04:34 PM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 6/14/2011
Posts: 1
Neurons: 3
Location: United Kingdom
richsap wrote:
Welcome to the world of the southern U.S. They (tornadoes) happen so frequently in the spring here that unless there is massive destruction it isn't really newsworthy.

My ex lives on the border of MA and I was watching the news footage to see if I could spot her flying by on her broom. No such luck.

Whistle
LOL,you really have a sense of humour.
driven
Posted: Friday, June 17, 2011 12:51:58 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/27/2009
Posts: 68
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Location: United States
Safety advise for tornadoes in general seems to not apply to the big ones. I just read that in Joplin the tornado pulled fire hydrants out of the ground (and they are attached to water mains.) Over the last few years I have read two reports of people who survived because they left home before the tornado got there. In both cases the house fell into the basement so they probably would not have survived there. (Still the most dangerous place to be when there is a tornado is in a car or mobile home.)

In one of the outbreaks there were a few small tornadoes about 30 miles away from here. A google map showing cloud rotation that night indicates that they went right over us only had not dropped yet. In the middle of that night we stood at the front door watching constant lightning.
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