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Do they mean the same? Options
DavidLearn
Posted: Thursday, February 16, 2017 4:53:57 AM

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Hi teachers,
If "bald" is an adjective used to describe someone (usually a man) with no hair on their head what's the meaning of "bald-headed"? Do they mean the same?
I also found that " bald-headed" is a sexier way of describing a man with no hair. Is that so?

Eg.
He started going bald in his twenties.
Bald-headed men are often very sexy and masculine.

Thanks.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Thursday, February 16, 2017 4:57:46 AM

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Bald is adjective, baldheaded is noun meaning a person with bald head.
DavidLearn
Posted: Thursday, February 16, 2017 5:09:27 AM

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Jyrkkä Jätkä wrote:
Bald is adjective, baldheaded is noun meaning a person with bald head.

Hi Jyrkkä Jätkä,
Got it! Thanks. Is it wrong to say "a person with a bald head."?

Best,
David.
milinad
Posted: Thursday, February 16, 2017 5:14:41 AM
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Bald-headed is also an adjective not a noun. The both mean the same when referring to man.

Bald is also used while referring to tyres with worn out tread
thar
Posted: Thursday, February 16, 2017 5:20:29 AM

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There is a level of politeness you use when describing people that uses different words from when you describe the process.

Eg

A man gets old.
You would call him an elderly man rather than an old man.

A man goes bald.
You would call him a bald -headed man rather than a bald man.

A man gets fat.
You would call him a well-built man, rather than a fat man.



There may be a very sneaky reason, as well. Purely my conjecture:

'Bald' is a really unnatural sound for English speakers to say. It often comes out as closer to 'bold'. So adding -headed makes it clear you mean bald, not bold. Whistle
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, February 16, 2017 5:26:21 AM

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"In days of old
when knights were bald . . ."

Doesn't work really.

I've never heard particularly about bald-headed men being sexy.
However, it's not a common subject of discussion for me.

******************
It's a matter of fashion:

or


DavidLearn
Posted: Thursday, February 16, 2017 5:29:07 AM

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Location: Girona, Catalonia, Spain
thar wrote:
There is a level of politeness you use when describing people that uses different words from when you describe the process.

Eg

A man gets old.
You would call him an elderly man rather than an old man.

A man goes bald.
You would call him a bald -headed man rather than a bald man.

A man gets fat.
You would call him a well-built man, rather than a fat man.



There may be a very sneaky reason, as well. Purely my conjecture:

'Bald' is a really unnatural sound for English speakers to say. It often comes out as closer to 'bold'. So adding -headed makes it clear you mean bald, not bold. Whistle


Hi thar,
Language works in mysterious ways, doesn't it? Whistle

Best,
David.
DavidLearn
Posted: Thursday, February 16, 2017 5:36:16 AM

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Drag0nspeaker wrote:

"In days of old
when knights were bald . . ."

Doesn't work really.

I've never heard particularly about bald-headed men being sexy.
However, it's not a common subject of discussion for me.

Hi Drag0n,
Thanks. I took the example from a dictionary. Whistle

Best,
David
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, February 16, 2017 5:45:07 AM

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Perhaps we should wait for some of the ladies to reply on that score.
goodcheer
Posted: Thursday, February 16, 2017 5:54:40 AM
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I strongly disagree with 'bald' being a taboo word or 'bald-headed' being a polite or euphemistic term. I grew up in the western US and have lived a long time in the south of England, and in both countries the normal term is 'bald'. If people want to be polite they avoid talking about the person's hair, but if they do mention it, the word is 'bald'. The word 'bald-headed' exists, but it's used much less often. In my ears, 'bald-headed' sounds like wordplay, a word chosen for its sound.

One limitation on 'bald' is that it is usually used for men, not women. This is mostly because baldness happens much more often among men and it's more often permanent among men. It's more common to hear of a woman, e.g. "she lost her hair from the chemotherapy" (note: the hair will probably grow back; she is not permanently bald). "Her eating disorder meant she lost her hair." (it will grow back if she starts eating enough) Being bald is considered much more tragic for a woman than a man, but even there it's the condition that's distressing, not the word. Similarly, advertisements selling treatments for not having hair where people want to have it refer to the condition as "hair loss" rather than "balding", but those ads want to target people who have thinning hair ("thinning" meaning "sparse", not that each hair is narrower than normal) as well as those who are already bald.

My (British) boyfriend is bald. When he refers to the state of his hair, he says "I'm bald". When I refer to the state of his hair, I say, "he's bald". If I were describing him to someone I would say he's somewhat tall, bald, and wearing a red shirt. It's a neutral term for a condition that some people are uncomfortable with.


DavidLearn
Posted: Thursday, February 16, 2017 5:55:11 AM

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Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Perhaps we should wait for some of the ladies to reply on that score.

Shouldn't we?
thar
Posted: Thursday, February 16, 2017 6:07:17 AM

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Drag0nspeaker wrote:
"In days of old
when knights were bald . . ."



It's the scolding hot water you have to watch out for. Shame on you

The whole thing of bald-headed and shaven-headed confuses me.

In some cases it seems like giving up (hair is too complicated to deal with).
In other cases there is not even that excuse. You spend enough time bald when you are older, why not enjoy hair while you have it?

Maybe this will be the new fashion for 2017?



Edit, oops, not American. It is the Times. UK.
(I just searched for an image of Ólafur Darri Ólafsson because I know he is in a lot of English-language stuff at the moment.)


Didn't mean to diverge from thread too early - David do say if you still have any questions.
DavidLearn
Posted: Thursday, February 16, 2017 6:14:59 AM

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thar wrote:
Didn't mean to diverge from thread too early - David do say if you still have any questions.


Hi thar,
No further questions at this point.Angel

Best,
David.
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