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"Which variety of English should I learn?" Options
TheParser
Posted: Tuesday, February 7, 2017 7:36:07 AM
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Dear Learners of English:

If you have already made a decision as to the variety of English that you wish to speak and write, that's great.

Congratulations!

There's no need wasting your precious time reading further.


**********

If you were to ask me, my opinion would be that you speak (and write) AMERICAN ENGLISH.

1. The United States is the most-populous English-speaking country in the world. I feel that it makes common sense, then, to speak this nation's variety of English.

2. I agree with those people who feel that the United States is still the most important country (economically, militarily, culturally) in the world. So I think that you should speak this nation's variety of English.

3. English spelling, of course, will always be difficult. But I feel that American spelling is the most simplified. For example, Americans spell the word "labor." There is no reason, in my opinion, that there should be an "o" in that word.

4. I believe that it is time all English speakers had a standardized vocabulary. For example, the word "cookie" (a small, flat, round cake) should be the word that all English speakers in the world use for that snack -- in my opinion.

5. English is, by common agreement, the world's international language.

a. I believe that an international language should be as standardized as possible.
b. The global economy (in which many of you learners are or will be working) needs clear and precise communication. So I feel that we should agree on one variety of English. And in my opinion, American English best fits the bill.
c. If you speak and write American English in your business dealings, you will be doing your part in nudging the business community toward adopting American English as the gold standard of the world's Englishes.

As you make your decision, I hope that you will take into consideration the points that I have presented to you.


Thank you and have a nice day!
S. Ilker Orsel
Posted: Tuesday, February 7, 2017 8:18:52 AM

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I agree with most of your points and would like to add my two cents as follows:

1. Probably due to the abundance of non-native speakers and their mixed learning material, the language most people speak is somewhat a blend of the two variants.
2. That being said, probably owing to the number of resources and material present, and possibly due to the presence of some shorter and arguably easier "Americanized" words (like "color",for instance) American English is usually more dominant in the blend.
3. As far as I am concerned, the differences are so minor that they are negligible; except for the use of several words like "pants" which are probably due to cultural differences.
4. While it may be easier for most people to learn the American variant (again possibnly due to abundance of materials like movies, TV shows, games, etc.); I would still advise learning both variants whenever possible. However, to me which version is "American" and which is "British" hardly matters as long as I know that they are both acceptable. There are also other variants, which may be good to know culturally (like the phrase "top of the morning").
5. While standardization is a good goal (that is probably why there is another variant called "International English"), languages are alive and they constantly evolve. Hence, change is inevitable. We will just have to cope with it.
6. Since I work in Contracts, I deal with a lot of differnt variants; and while there are many American variants written around, Contracts in international projects usually tend to be more British. At least that has been my experience so far.

Note: edited to add item 6.
TheParser
Posted: Tuesday, February 7, 2017 8:32:32 AM
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S. Ilker Orsel wrote:
Contracts in international projects usually tend to be more British.



How interesting!

Thanks for sharing that information.
Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1
Posted: Tuesday, February 7, 2017 9:07:59 AM

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TheParser wrote:
Dear Learners of English:

If you have already made a decision as to the variety of English that you wish to speak and write, that's great.

Congratulations!

There's no need wasting your precious time reading further.

No, no! I read everything you write.

Quote:
If you were to ask me, my opinion would be that you speak (and write) AMERICAN ENGLISH.

The only English that is English is British English. American English is just another patois.

Quote:
3. English spelling, of course, will always be difficult. But I feel that American spelling is the most simplified. For example, Americans spell the word "labor." There is no reason, in my opinion, that there should be an "o" in that word.

If you need a "reasonable" spelling you need to consider a full-scale English spelling reform.

Quote:
4.For example, the word "cookie" (a small, flat, round cake) should be the word that all English speakers in the world use for that snack -- in my opinion.

My friend used to work for McVities, a subsidiary of United Biscuits. I would fall of my chair if he said he worked for United Cookies.

Quote:
a. I believe that an international language should be as standardized as possible.

When I lived in Canada I met Americans, Australians and Brits. I didn't notice them to have any problems.
And after all if you live in Russia whatever you do however you strive you will speak Runglish.
ellana
Posted: Tuesday, February 7, 2017 10:01:48 AM
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As an ESL tutor for the past seven years, I have to disagree with The Parser. In my humble opinion, I think a broader approach to learning, speaking and writing English is the way to go.

I have a 'classic' North American accent but I insist with my students on good pronunciation versus any particular accent. In other words, I don't insist on my students aping how I speak but rather that I want to understand them. The aim being to be well understood by English speakers from anywhere.

I use British spelling though I expand to include American spelling for the sake of knowledge and recognition. I always give a choice and suggest that they stick to one formula. Whether it's colour or color, spoken or read, both are very clear and far from confusing. As for cookies vs. biscuits, gas vs. petrol, why not know both?
I avoid gonna and wanna like the plague.

Languages are always in evolutionary mode, especially these days with tech parlance. Non anglophone countries borrow English words all the time and vice versa. Here in France, I am shocked at the English used in French conversation, most of it mispronounced and often outside the original definition. You may all remember how George W. Bush said that the French had borrowed the word entrepreneur because they don't have an equivalent word in French! But I digress...

In the spirit of inclusiveness and acceptance of variables, my vote goes to being broad-minded in our global environment.
Yes, English is the current international language. No country has a monopoly on spelling and pronunciation.
Let's communicate in a respectful manner.
Hope123
Posted: Tuesday, February 7, 2017 10:15:18 AM

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Canadian English is the best, eh what? 🇨🇦🇨🇦🇨🇦Whistle Whistle Whistle

Actually one needs to learn to speak in emoticons these days.

👍🇨🇦✅
towan52
Posted: Tuesday, February 7, 2017 10:29:28 AM
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I recuse myself on the grounds of a conflict of interest - but I tend to faver... Whistle
Wilmar (USA) 1M
Posted: Tuesday, February 7, 2017 10:37:26 AM

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An English language learner is doing well to learn any variety of English (British, American, Canadian). The variations are limited and in most cases, easily understood, such that little concern should be given it. However, I would not endeavor to learn the variation of English spoken in India.
snafu22q
Posted: Tuesday, February 7, 2017 10:52:33 AM
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Good morning all,

First, the typo - not important for the native English speakers, but since this thread is targeted toward non-English speakers ... #3 of Parser's list ... I'm sure he means "There is no reason, in my opinion, that there should be an "u" in that word." (colour)

As far as Brit vs American (or Aussie, Kiwi, ... etc) - it's all English. Maybe not to the purists out there, but in practical terms, it's all the same.

Are there differences? Of course - many. But I would argue that the differences are no more than the number of arcane, rarely used words that one learns while progressing through life. You pick them up and learn them as you need them. And while I may not receive exactly what I think I will if I order cookies or biscuits, I *will* learn from it.

I know very little about educational systems around the world, but I know that when a student begins English classes in Denmark (now starting in 3rd grade, I believe - bravo for getting your students started so early in learning another language, Denmark :) ), they are taught Oxford English - almost militantly, from what I understand. Using American English, especially that gleaned from American TV & movies, is the quickest way to doing poorly in class.

But Danes are excellent English speakers overall. It's all English - they'll adapt.

I have a question for those who have learned the Queen's English - specifically regarding the word "revert".

Many times I have been the recipient of an email that ends with, in essence, "...if you have any questions or if you are interested in this project, revert back to me."

Is it common for native (Oxford) English speakers to use 'revert' in this context? I have *never* seen it used in this way in AE.

The senders of these emails are obviously saying to get in touch with them, or reply to them. And in looking at the Collins dictionary, the 4th definition is indeed, "to reply to someone". And without exception, every one of of the senders that used 'revert' in this manner were not native English speakers (yes, I'm profiling - all had Indian or Pakistani sounding names; not that that matters, it's simply that I would have expected them to learn Oxford English due to the history between the Britain and this region).

So while this use is obviously grammatically correct, my question, again to native BE speakers - is this use of the word *common* in BE? Or would you have acted as I did..."Revert?? That means go back to a previous state."

Just curious - and when I get the answer, there will be one more AE/BE link I understand. :D
hedy mmm
Posted: Tuesday, February 7, 2017 10:56:32 AM

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You are Correctomundo ....TheParser!

ellana, I'm sorry but I must disagree with you....I also taught ESL for over 25 yrs and I'm an 'American' who speaks 3 languages....English IS my first language and American English is the best, in my humble opinion.

...in particular to your examples; 'cookies' and 'biscuits' are not the same at all.....a cookie is a small sweet cake, flat, usually round and crisp. A biscuit is soft, breadlike because of other ingredients, such as bread leavened with baking powder, baking soda and sometimes yeast...perfect for a breakfast sandwich.

And if you should go to McDonald's Restaurant, anywhere in the world, and ask for a 'bacon, egg & cheese on a cookie' instead of on a 'biscuit'....good luck!

Again, Perfectly stated ....TheParser
TheParser
Posted: Tuesday, February 7, 2017 11:11:23 AM
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Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1 wrote:

The only English that is English is British English. American English is just another patois.



I am sure that some learners who are deciding in which variety to become fluent will consider your opinion in making their decision.

Thank you
TheParser
Posted: Tuesday, February 7, 2017 11:18:21 AM
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snafu22q wrote:


First, the typo - not important for the native English speakers, but since this thread is targeted toward non-English speakers ... #3 of Parser's list ... I'm sure he means "There is no reason, in my opinion, that there should be an "u" in that word." (colour)



Thank you so much for pointing out my mistake. Yes, "labor" vs. "labour."

Many years ago, an Australian wrote a letter to the LONDON REVIEW OF BOOKS, a very erudite British publication, which is my favorite (print) publication.

The Australian "ordered" the editor to use the American system of spelling and mocked the British system.

The editor printed the Australian's letter under the words "What Nerve!"


hedy mmm
Posted: Tuesday, February 7, 2017 11:33:00 AM

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Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1 wrote:

The only English that is English is British English. American English is just another patois


Answered and withdrawn like a true Russian
TheParser
Posted: Tuesday, February 7, 2017 11:37:48 AM
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hedy mmm wrote:


Again, Perfectly stated ....TheParser



Thanks. I just wanted to share my opinions with any learners who have not yet decided.

Some of them will decide to follow your and my advice.

Others will decide to follow the advice of the other posters.

That's the beauty of a discussion thread in which all the posters reply in a respectful manner, sharing thoughtful comments and even humor/humour!

I think that this thread is TFD at its best!
TheParser
Posted: Tuesday, February 7, 2017 11:45:24 AM
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ellana wrote:
You may all remember how George W. Bush said that the French had borrowed the word entrepreneur because they don't have an equivalent word in French!


That's new to me.

Very funny!

I understand that the President does not pronounce the "h" in "huge." It seems to be a New York thing.
TheParser
Posted: Tuesday, February 7, 2017 11:50:05 AM
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snafu22q wrote:


But Danes are excellent English speakers overall.




As you know, one of the greatest grammarians of the English language was a Danish gentleman named Otto Jespersen.
Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1
Posted: Tuesday, February 7, 2017 12:27:15 PM

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hedy mmm wrote:
Answered and withdrawn like a true Russian

That's a bit ad hominem! Let's not get personal.
Romany
Posted: Tuesday, February 7, 2017 1:20:35 PM
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In the world of ESL, unfortunately, students don't get a choice.

The individual companies use, not unnaturally, the language THEY speak and where their company is registered. They may use either form - and test students, obviously, in that form.

That's one of the reasons poster's profile require people to put in where they are living. There's no use me giving advice based on 'BE' or even International English, if the student is destined for further study/work in the USA. And vice-versa, of course, if the student is not going to America - because International English is spoken everywhere else except the Philippines who use American.

Sounds complicated, like that, doesn't it? But we manage to muddle on, and most people adjust to it.

Yes, the really good ones use International English and take the Oxford as the final arbiter in grammar/vocab/syntax, as you say.

And yes, also, 'English' is the language spoken in England. American, Australian,Jamaican etc. etc Englishes are unique dialects. We had to make the classification "B.E." and "A.E" here as some people who didn't know this, objected to the linguistic terminology...so B.E. and A.E. became a kind of ad hoc descriptor on TFD (Much to the chagrin of some Welsh, Irish & Scottish posters!!).

There've been numerous jokes about the differences in American English and our English is diverging. Until about 30 years years ago, vocabulary really was the only area in which we occasionally differed and, with the occasional faux-pas on either side giggled at and forgotten, we learnt that it wasn't such a huge difference.

However, syntax differs hugely now, and grammar itself has started inexorably detaching itself from ours (English). Linguists now really do foresee a time when the American language will come into it's own as a rich mixture which includes input from all the different inhabitants of that country; and will differ substantially.

Interesting to ponder that, isn't it?

SNAFU: - we had a thread on 'revert' last year: try putting it into a search tho' as I don't recall when it was. It's an Indian construction and is, as you astutely noticed, perfectly acceptable on the sub-continent. Who knows, one day that usage might just slide into International English, too but, as yet it is still a variant.



Lotje1000
Posted: Tuesday, February 7, 2017 1:32:43 PM

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snafu22q wrote:
I know very little about educational systems around the world, but I know that when a student begins English classes in Denmark (now starting in 3rd grade, I believe - bravo for getting your students started so early in learning another language, Denmark :) ), they are taught Oxford English - almost militantly, from what I understand. Using American English, especially that gleaned from American TV & movies, is the quickest way to doing poorly in class.


In Belgium, we are taught Oxford English as a standard. Most university professors tend to add that you're welcome to use American English instead (for instance, to write papers), so long as you remain consistent. I believe it is a healthy approach to not start claiming one language is inherently better than another. Such discussions are futile, not to mention quite linguistically narrow-minded and rather culturally insulting.

As always with language: Dress for the occasion.
Anita Snyder
Posted: Tuesday, February 7, 2017 1:56:08 PM

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One aspect not mentioned is that a language learner may want to imagine which country they may end up in. If you are learning English in a non-English speaking country, you learning curve is still going to be great once you land wherever you are going (short or long term). Just catching the accent and local idioms will be tough.

Since both the UK and the US are in populism tantrums right now that are overall anti-immigrant, you might not end up in either of these!

As for:

TheParser wrote:

4. I believe that it is time all English speakers had a standardized vocabulary. For example, the word "cookie" (a small, flat, round cake) should be the word that all English speakers in the world use for that snack -- in my opinion.


Good luck with that. Your profile does not list your current location nor background, but cookies (flat, round and sweet and often hard or crunchy but can also be more cake-like) in AE differ greatly from biscuits (tall, fluffy and savory), not to mention that we also have crackers (flat, round, savory and crunchy).

Some of this is going to be cultural and regional, due to the recipes that immigrants arrived with and the raw materials that were available.


TheParser wrote:

a. I believe that an international language should be as standardized as possible.


Esperanto, anyone? Languages are never going to be standardized because they live only because we speak them. And children learn much of their vernacular from parents, relatives, care givers, in their earliest years. That is why accents and regionalisms persist.

To me, the differences are small in the large picture, with cute differences along the way. The hardest part will be understanding pronunciation and catching the cadence.


as for 'revert' I wonder if that is something plugged into the email or letter form of the word processor. It is funny because most of the people that ever write 'regards' on their letters (to me) are Chinese - and I think they get it by using the MS Word form letter. Maybe it is a BE thing...

Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1
Posted: Tuesday, February 7, 2017 2:51:08 PM

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Anita Snyder wrote:

TheParser wrote:

4. I believe that it is time all English speakers had a standardized vocabulary. For example, the word "cookie" (a small, flat, round cake) should be the word that all English speakers in the world use for that snack -- in my opinion.


Good luck with that. Your profile does not list your current location nor background, but cookies (flat, round and sweet and often hard or crunchy but can also be more cake-like) in AE differ greatly from biscuits (tall, fluffy and savory), not to mention that we also have crackers (flat, round, savory and crunchy).


I guess TheParser knows this.

His suggestion is that this "small, flat, round cake" should be called "cookie" in Britain.

ellana
Posted: Tuesday, February 7, 2017 3:40:07 PM
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hedy... Your years of teaching ESL in 'American English' do not make your views the gospel truth. My point was to express an opinion that the English language is multi faceted. We all agree that languages evolve but authority on the subject is a different matter. Sorry but the USA does not have the last word on English... many countries have English as a national language with many variables and they are not inferior. Americans have a bit of a superiority complex clearly expressed by your comments.
towan52
Posted: Tuesday, February 7, 2017 4:09:41 PM
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I believe that "Jammy Dodgers" have come up on this forum before, but are far too sophisticated for any but a true-Brit to appreciate. The cultural art of dunking a Rich Tea biscuit in a cup of tea and gauging to a nano-second the instant it will no longer hold together is, again, an art that did not make it over the Atlantic. In any event BE was first, so biscuits are as shown in Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1's post. Clearly this Muscovite is both sophisticated and erudite.


Hope123
Posted: Tuesday, February 7, 2017 4:38:35 PM

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towan52 wrote:
I believe that "Jammy Dodgers" have come up on this forum before, but are far too sophisticated for any but a true-Brit to appreciate. The cultural art of dunking a Rich Tea biscuit in a cup of tea and gauging to a nano-second the instant it will no longer hold together is, again, an art that did not make it over the Atlantic. In any event BE was first, so biscuits are as shown in Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1's post. Clearly this Muscovite is both sophisticated and erudite.




I smiled at the emboldened words - but yeah, we do dunk sometimes. But maybe we are more Brit than we realize. Never heard of Jammy Dodgers though - is that a bedtime treat?

Of course Xap is sophiticated and erudite. He lived in Canada for a while and we taught him. Whistle Whistle Whistle
hedy mmm
Posted: Tuesday, February 7, 2017 5:36:31 PM

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ellena.....please read what I wrote again...I never said, or even suggested that 'my views are the gospel truths'......
Please read where I state '....in my humble opinion'. Perhaps, my comments were perceived as argumentative, it was never my intent.

Now you see why it's so important to read before passing judgement. I'm sure you have encountered the problem of students who don't READ their assignments properly and get the answers wrong....so I apologize for the misunderstanding. Pray

Teaching is an honorable and rewarding profession, not many can fill those shoes....when my husband transitioned 3 yrs ago, he had retired 17 yrs earlier as a teacher (he taught for 32 yrs). At his memorial service, two woman, unbeknownst to me, asked to speak of him...they both had been his students in the 70's..... my husband would CALL the parents if they weren't in school......not only did they graduate, but one of them was my grandson teacher in 5th grade (different school, miles apart)...she became privy of his demise when she read my grandson's surname on the first day of class....my husband passed 3 days later...our friendship remains.

I know I segued from TheParser's post but I wanted you to understand that there was no malice in my disagreeing and I do admire your candor. A fellow teacher, hedy

BTW Xap6X I love your photos of cookies my favorite is the 'Jammy Dodgers' with a glass of cold milk...mmmm ....
and towan52, I am American who likes hearts in her cookies, (don't beat up yourself to badly just enjoy your tea cookies & tea, on me....) Brick wall

thanks all, especially TheParser for your thread ....Applause
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, February 7, 2017 6:23:53 PM

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hedy mmm wrote:
if you should go to McDonald's Restaurant . . .

You deserve to eat the stuff they give you.

Why would anyone go to a MacDonald's? Whistle

There are inconsistencies in all the different 'breeds' of English. None of them are artificial languages, so they are bound to have 'vagaries'.

I just think that the British vagaries - being the originals - are the best. Not talking
I mean English people speak English from England, innit? Whistle Applause
Americans are gonna speak a mix of German, Russian, Hebrew, Algonquin, Yiddish, English, French, Xhosa and whatever. (I realise there isn't a country called 'whatever' - it's a small sub-precinct of New Yoik)Silenced .

*****************
Concerning biscuits.

The word is from French - originally from Latin roots 'bes cuire' - twice cooked.
Bread or cake, once cooked, is generally soft. When it is re-baked, it becomes hard, crunchy and crisp.

The soft stuff Americans call "biscuit" is therefore obviously mis-named.
And the whole idea of eating bacon and eggs on a biscuit . . . WHY?
Who would ever ask for such a thing . . .

**************
However, joking aside, I feel that PLAIN chocolate digestives are the best (not milk chocolate - good 85%-cocoa black chocolate).
hedy mmm
Posted: Tuesday, February 7, 2017 9:36:32 PM

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OH ..... DragOnspeaker,d'oh! I CONCUR...I only used it as an example, I do not eat fast foods! ....but, believe it or not...a bacon or sausage, egg & cheese biscuit is so delish (eaten elsewhere) you'd be hooked...don't dismiss a once baked biscuit with soft, crumbly, buttery morsel until you've tried one...

But I'll have you know that you omitted "Spanish" d'oh! in the small sub precinct of New Yoik (I gotta kick out of your spelling) where I hail from Silenced ...but I'll forgive you! Dancing

TheParser, your thread was fun and informative ...cookies/biscuits are pretty much universal. I don't care who takes credit for their origin, just feed me!

TMe
Posted: Tuesday, February 7, 2017 11:14:50 PM

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I enjoyed the discussion thoroughly and comprehensively. A humble cool one is best.

Howver, in India,the students are taught to read, write and speak this language as per the rules. No 'wanna or shanna' 'lemme and shlemme' etc. Neat and clean.
Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1
Posted: Wednesday, February 8, 2017 12:41:08 AM

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Hope123 wrote:
Of course Xap is sophiticated and erudite. He lived in Canada for a while and we taught him. Whistle Whistle Whistle

He he! Yes I learnt a lot when living in Canada.
almo 1
Posted: Wednesday, February 8, 2017 2:45:09 AM
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At the end of the day, you've got to(have to) teach yourself, study by yourself as continuously as possible, that is the name of the game.

In this modern age, you can use Internet:
you can listen to or watch NPR, PBS, DemocracyNow,
and last but not least Rush Limbaugh.

They all have transcripts that is the good point.

**********

Time flies so I don't want to be deeply involved in Forum discussion, or Twitter or Facebook.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Wednesday, February 8, 2017 2:49:36 AM

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hedy mmm wrote:
OH ..... DragOnspeaker,d'oh! I CONCUR...I only used it as an example, I do not eat fast foods! ....but, believe it or not...a bacon or sausage, egg & cheese biscuit is so delish (eaten elsewhere) you'd be hooked...don't dismiss a once baked biscuit with soft, crumbly, buttery morsel until you've tried one...

But I'll have you know that you omitted "Spanish" d'oh! in the small sub precinct of New Yoik (I gotta kick out of your spelling) where I hail from Silenced ...but I'll forgive you! Dancing

TheParser, your thread was fun and informative ...cookies/biscuits are pretty much universal. I don't care who takes credit for their origin, just feed me!



I would not dismiss a biscuit, they are very similar to what we call scones. I still make cheese scones to my Grandmothers receipe using Red Cheddar and Stilton Cheese.
almo 1
Posted: Wednesday, February 8, 2017 3:53:17 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/16/2016
Posts: 1,253
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Location: Fussa, Tokyo, Japan
almo 1 wrote:

At the end of the day, you've got to(have to) teach yourself, study by yourself as continuously as possible, that is the name of the game.

In this modern age, you can use Internet:
you can listen to or watch NPR, PBS, DemocracyNow,
and last but not least Rush Limbaugh.

They all have transcripts that is the good point.

**********

Time flies so I don't want to be deeply involved in Forum discussion, or Twitter or Facebook.



$$$$$$$$$$

Oh, I forgot about this.
I occasionally visit there.
Very useful.

Lost in Space


Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Wednesday, February 8, 2017 4:45:13 AM

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Joined: 9/21/2009
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In Finland we eat keksi or pikkuleipä (two kind of British biscuits), or pulla (American biscuit).

And we start learning foreign language, usually English, from the third grade in school. There are plans now to start the first foreign language in the first grade.

I was taught Oxford English in the 60's and 70's. What I've seen, it's now more like International English. Those kids now in school, or recently graduated, tend to have an American accent but can use British terms.


EDIT: Almost forgot! We do dunk biscuits in tea, or more likely, in coffee ;-)
hedy mmm
Posted: Wednesday, February 8, 2017 10:30:59 AM

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Location: Borough of Bronx, New York, United States
Sarrriesfan wrote:
I would not dismiss a biscuit, they are very similar to what we call scones. I still make cheese scones to my Grandmothers receipe using Red Cheddar and Stilton Cheese.


Sarrriesfan, that looks exactly like the biscuits I love...I've never had those cheeses but they sound yummy....great pict...

Jyrkkä Jätkä, dunking is the bestest...like Oreo cookies in milk, Ritz crackers in coffee...eek! I'm getting hungry...

thank you, Applause
hedy
TMe
Posted: Wednesday, February 8, 2017 11:49:54 AM

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Joined: 1/12/2017
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Diversity with unity is good. Meaningless and endless discussion is harmfull.All understandable conversation, which may belong to any language or dilect is is acceptable. For a peaceful world let's underatnd the word 'peace', not " iam right'.
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