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bottles of Coke and cans of Sprite Options
luckyguy
Posted: Friday, January 27, 2017 2:42:04 AM
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I have written two sentences below. I am not sure which one is correct.

(1) In the upcoming event, the soft drink sponsor will be giving out bottles of Coke and cans of Sprite.

(2) In the upcoming event, the soft drink sponsor will be giving out Coke in bottles and Sprite in cans.

Which one makes more sense? Please help me. Thanks a lot.
srirr
Posted: Friday, January 27, 2017 3:17:37 AM

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Both the sentences are grammatically correct, however the first one is more suitable, IMO.
'Bottles of Coke' means the bottles marketed by the company (Coke) which contain the expected beverages. But the therm 'Coke in bottles' may mean serving Coke in any bottle. (This can not be a common practice but this is what one can infer.) This can be done through dispensers or taking the drink from a bigger bottle to smaller ones. The bottles may not be sealed.


Peter O'Connor - Dundalk
Posted: Friday, January 27, 2017 3:19:17 AM

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Both are correct, however the first 'feels' better.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Friday, January 27, 2017 3:21:30 AM

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I agree with srirr about the minor difference in nuance.
I'd use the following sentence:

In the upcoming event, the soft drink sponsor will be giving out Coke bottles and Sprite cans.
Shulamit
Posted: Friday, January 27, 2017 5:09:16 AM

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Jyrkkä Jätkä wrote:
I agree with srirr about the minor difference in nuance.
I'd use the following sentence:

In the upcoming event, the soft drink sponsor will be giving out Coke bottles and Sprite cans.


Wellllllllll. Hate to be picky, BUT: giving out Coke bottles and Sprite cans could mean that they are giving out the bottles and cans without anything in them, so bottles OF Coke and cans OF Sprite is probably clearer. Though if the announcement does word it: Coke bottles and Sprite cans, they couldn't be sued when the bottles and cans were empty because the statement was cleverly vague.

I've just decided not to go to that event.
Wilmar (USA) 1M
Posted: Friday, January 27, 2017 10:27:12 AM

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Bottles of Coke and cans of Sprite are very common expressions. This is exactly how people reference these items.
There is no suggestion from this language that either the can or bottle could be empty, as someone mentioned.

The only people who might be confused about Coke in bottles and Sprite in can would be English language learners. There is nothing wrong with using those phrasings, except that they are somewhat clumsy, but they are heard.

Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Saturday, January 28, 2017 8:06:16 AM

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lickyguy (1) In the upcoming event, the soft drink sponsor will be giving out bottles of Coke and cans of Sprite.

(2) In the upcoming event, the soft drink sponsor will be giving out Coke in bottles and Sprite in cans.


srirr

Both the sentences are grammatically correct, however, the first one is more suitable, IMO.
'Bottles of Coke' means the bottles marketed by the company (Coke) which contain the expected beverages. But the term 'Coke in bottles' may mean serving Coke in any bottle. (This can not be a common practice but this is what one can infer.) This can be done through dispensers or taking the drink from a bigger bottle to smaller ones. The bottles may not be sealed.

[b] Both are correct.
Imagination can take one to many directions. One should accept the general and the most commonly understood meaning in the absence of any technical hint or doubt. Coke bottles and sprite cans here undoubtedly mean with/containing beverages.
Romany
Posted: Saturday, January 28, 2017 10:01:11 AM
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Exactly right; sentence one - bottles of Coke and cans of Sprite - is the clearest and what is said usually.

sentence two COULD perhaps be used in certain, particular instances.

However in normal circumstances it would indeed be unclear, capable of misinterpretation, and would sound unnatural.
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