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Koh Elaine
Posted: Monday, December 26, 2016 12:03:06 PM
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Where I live, the short form for air-conditioner and air-conditioning is aircond.

My aircond (air-conditioner) has broken down.
There is no aircond (air-conditioning) in this office.

What do native speakers use for the short forms of air-conditioner or air-conditioning?

Thanks.
thar
Posted: Monday, December 26, 2016 1:29:02 PM

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Windows!

Just kidding. I have never lived in any place with air conditioning. I think in Britain it would be called air con (but it is rare and usually part of a hot air/cold air system, I think). Also a.c. but I think that is more American. In the US maybe even just 'air', though I am not too sure about that.



In English, 'con' is a more natural shortening than 'cond' because the prefix is 'con'. It is also easier to say than a word ending in 'd'. You have to pull your tongue back to make the sound of 'cond'! Whistle
NKM
Posted: Monday, December 26, 2016 2:48:42 PM

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Location: Corinth, New York, United States
I don't have air conditioning, but most people around here would refer to it as "A.C." (in a building), or sometimes just "air" (in a car).

Of course there's some potential ambiguity, since "AC" can also me the electrical (Alternating Current) supply of a building. (Context is important!)

Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, December 26, 2016 3:59:45 PM

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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
As thar says, Air Conditioning is not a 'thing' in Britain.
Houses have heating and ventilation.

I think that when anyone does mention it, mostly (as least in my experience) we use AC (pronounced aycee) - but an engineer specialising in that area is a HVAC engineer (pronounced aitchvak) - and he works on the HVAC of buildings. Heating/Ventilation/Air Conditioning.
There are also heating engineers who never trained on AC.

I have never heard AC used to mean electricity.
Yes, a laboratory may have an AC power supply, a DC power supply and a three-phase power supply, but a house is standardly single-phase fifty hertz 240volts. There is no need to specify 'AC' for a power supply. If someone said "My house has AC", it would mean "air-conditioning".
coag
Posted: Monday, December 26, 2016 10:07:34 PM

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Air con, not to be confused with Con Air. Con Air is a movie.
Simon M
Posted: Monday, December 26, 2016 10:16:09 PM

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Location: Arezzo, Tuscany, Italy
Different places, different ways of naming it. I traveled in countries where it is called aircon, aircond, AC, A/C, conditioner. In South East Asia A/C seems to be standard, probably because it is easier to pronounce where English is not that easy to speak.
srirr
Posted: Monday, December 26, 2016 11:01:19 PM

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True Simon.
A.C. or A/C is the term used for air conditioners or air conditioning.
NKM
Posted: Tuesday, December 27, 2016 7:08:23 PM

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Location: Corinth, New York, United States
Drag0nspeaker wrote:

I have never heard AC used to mean electricity.
Yes, a laboratory may have an AC power supply, a DC power supply and a three-phase power supply, but a house is standardly single-phase fifty hertz 240volts. There is no need to specify 'AC' for a power supply. If someone said "My house has AC", it would mean "air-conditioning".

══════════════════════════════════════════════

Technical note:

Here in the U.S., a house is normally wired with two-phase, sixty hertz, 240 volts at the entrance panel, split into separate 120-volt single-phase circuits for normal in-house outlets and lighting. Heavy-duty appliances (notably clothes dryers, electric ranges, and sometimes air-conditioners) use the full 240 volts.

MelissaMe
Posted: Tuesday, December 27, 2016 8:45:05 PM

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Location: Gualala, California, United States
thar wrote:
Windows!


That's the source of AC in my new home! Pray

Heating will be done by a hydronic heating system in the floor. Yay!

Quote:

I have never lived in any place with air conditioning.


Never, ever? Really? Lucky you! Your lungs thank you, I'm sure.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, December 28, 2016 4:56:17 AM

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Joined: 9/12/2011
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
NKM wrote:
Technical note:

Here in the U.S., a house is normally wired with two-phase, sixty hertz, 240 volts at the entrance panel, split into separate 120-volt single-phase circuits for normal in-house outlets and lighting. Heavy-duty appliances (notably clothes dryers, electric ranges, and sometimes air-conditioners) use the full 240 volts.

Thanks. That's interesting.

MelissaMe wrote:
That's the source of AC in my new home! Pray

Heating will be done by a hydronic heating system in the floor. Yay!

That's cool! (Well, actually it's warm . . .Whistle )
Enjoy your new home!
Koh Elaine
Posted: Thursday, December 29, 2016 11:17:29 AM
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Thanks, everybody.
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