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D. Kirk
Posted: Wednesday, November 2, 2016 6:02:42 AM
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Joined: 7/21/2014
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I was learning about clauses, but so far I have realised that the subjects in a clause are always followed by a verb. For that matter is the following a clause?

-- Come and let go.




Is there any hard and fast rule that subject must be followed by a verb in order to be a clause?

Many thanks!
leonAzul
Posted: Wednesday, November 2, 2016 6:46:19 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/11/2011
Posts: 8,589
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Location: Miami, Florida, United States
D. Kirk wrote:
I was learning about clauses, but so far I have realised that the subjects in a clause are always followed by a verb. For that matter is the following a clause?

-- Come and let go.




Is there any hard and fast rule that subject must be followed by a verb in order to be a clause?

Many thanks!


Yes, your example is not only a clause but also a sentence. The heart and soul of a clause is its verb.

The explanation is that, for some clauses, the subject is tacitly understood. In this example, the imperative mode allows for the proper subject "you" to be understood. Thus, this sentence could be understood to mean "You must come and you must let go", although no native speaker of English would ever say it that way.

"Subject, Verb, Object" (SVO) is the natural order for the main clause of a declarative utterance in English. Interrogative , imperative, and subordinate clauses are marked by appropriate exceptions to this general rule.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, November 2, 2016 11:20:56 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hello D Kirk.
Just to add a little data - there are different types of clause (just as there are different types of sentence) but they have three vital ingredients - a subject, a predicate and a finite verb.
As leon says, sometimes, the subject is 'understood' or 'invisible', but it exists.

clause n
1. (Grammar) grammar a group of words, consisting of a subject and a predicate including a finite verb, that does not necessarily constitute a sentence.


A sentence can stand alone. It makes sense (though you may need other sentences to understand exactly what it means.

A clause can be a whole sentence, but it may also be impossible to understand without further words.
It doesn't have to make full sense alone.

A phrase is a group of words which has some meaning, but doesn't always have "subject, predicate and finite verb".

"I am English." is a sentence (and is also a clause).
"I like strawberries." is a sentence (and is also a clause).

"I am English and I like strawberries." is a sentence - and it is two clauses.
"I am English and like strawberries." is a sentence - and it is two clauses - but the second clause has a 'hidden' subject.
"I am an Englishman who likes strawberries." is a sentence - and it is two clauses. (The subject is 'who' which relates back to "I" from the first clause.)

"It is true, I like strawberries." is a sentence - and is two clauses. (Each clause could be a separate sentence.)
"That I like strawberries is true." is a sentence, and is two clauses. (Each clause could be a separate sentence. - "I like strawberries. That is true.")

"Liking strawberries is an attribute of mine." is a sentence and only one clause. "Liking strawberries" has no subject, and has no finite verb. It is a phrase acting as a noun. The only finite verb is "is".
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