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D. Kirk
Posted: Wednesday, November 2, 2016 4:54:18 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/21/2014
Posts: 163
Neurons: 900
Hi everyone how are you? Hope you are good.

Please, help me know these;

-- When I was in Junior High I didn't/don't like writing notes
Which one is correct? Is it "didn't" or "don't"

-- A teacher was teaching and in the middle of his lectures he asked his students if they have understood the concept by asking -
"understood"?
And the students responded yes sir!

I was thinking the teacher should have said; 'do you understand'?

Why do you think he used only 'understood' to elicit response from his learners?
Or was he trying to say "have you understood"

Please help.

Many thanks
Warped
Posted: Wednesday, November 2, 2016 9:51:58 AM
Rank: Member

Joined: 5/12/2015
Posts: 50
Neurons: 34,381
-- When I was in Junior High I didn't/don't like writing notes
Which one is correct? Is it "didn't" or "don't" -- It's "didn't."

I was thinking the teacher should have said; 'do you understand'?

You can just ask, "Understood?" It is short for what you have suggested.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, November 2, 2016 10:42:06 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 35,590
Neurons: 248,054
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hi D. Kirk.
Warped is right - "When I was young" is definitely in the past - so you have to say what the situation was in the past - I didn't like writing notes.

"Understood?" is short for "Have you understood?" or - more likely - "Is that understood?"

One could also say "Understand?" - short for "Do you understand?"

In my opinion, 'understood?' is a bit more 'authoritarian' than 'understand?' - it seems to be used more for orders, rather than data.

"You are never to run in the school corridors. - Understood?"
"Two plus two equals four. Understand?"

D. Kirk
Posted: Wednesday, November 2, 2016 3:46:00 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/21/2014
Posts: 163
Neurons: 900
Thank you friends--I must say it's a lucid explanation.
I see Dragon using ''data' to mean 'information' are they that interchangeable? With no subtle difference? Pls confirm
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, November 3, 2016 4:46:11 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 35,590
Neurons: 248,054
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hi again!

Yes - 'data' and 'information' are pretty much interchangeable.

'Data' is more used for technical, scientific, educational information - but there is definitely no rule about it.

Quote:
usage: 'data' is a plural of 'datum', orig. a Latin noun meaning “a thing given.” Today, 'data' is used in English both as a plural noun meaning “facts or pieces of information” (These data are described fully on page 8) and as a singular mass noun meaning “information”: The data has been entered in the computer. It is almost always treated as a plural in scientific and academic writing, as a singular or plural elsewhere depending on the context. The singular 'datum' meaning “a piece of information” occurs most frequently in academic or scientific writing.
Collins Dictionary
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