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To depend upon a profession is a less odious form of slavery than to depend upon a father. Options
Daemon
Posted: Monday, October 24, 2016 12:00:00 AM
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To depend upon a profession is a less odious form of slavery than to depend upon a father.

Virginia Woolf (1882-1941)
KSPavan
Posted: Monday, October 24, 2016 12:23:29 AM

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Quotation of the Day

To depend upon a profession is a less odious form of slavery than to depend upon a father.

Virginia Woolf (1882-1941)
pedro
Posted: Monday, October 24, 2016 3:35:08 AM
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more than a murmur of an unhappy childhood perhaps
Ouarasse
Posted: Monday, October 24, 2016 5:38:44 AM

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The context that produced the attitude expressed in the quote is very clear. British women's role in society was changing fast as a result of the war. The fact that many more women were able to find paid jobs could be considered as a change in patrons: first the father and now the boss (or the profession). However, looked at from a larger angle, and also from a century later, Woolf's words sound like those of a very angry and, more importantly, hopeless person. Anger is the emotional response to perceptions of injustice; hepolessness is when the perceived injustice seems overwhelming. It is true that society has not been fair to women around the globe. But it is also possible that even within such societies, still equipped with unfair laws and practices, the unpriviledged can CREATE not only a breathing space but a constructive harnessing of the winds of change to their own favour. The unpriviledged need to build resilience. They need to LEARN how to bounce back! Anger, if well exploited, can be a game-changing propelling force. Hopelessness does not rhyme with humanity.
Bebe AlRasheed
Posted: Monday, October 24, 2016 7:13:09 AM

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Daemon wrote:
To depend upon a profession is a less odious form of slavery than to depend upon a father.

Virginia Woolf (1882-1941)


Pray
ibj_ldn
Posted: Monday, October 24, 2016 8:38:52 AM

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I guess this shows the need for women to be independent since long ago.
monamagda
Posted: Monday, October 24, 2016 11:27:15 AM

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Context from:THREE GUINEAS by Virginia Woolf 1938


That, Sir, was the right that was conferred upon us less than twenty years ago, in the year 1919, by an Act which unbarred the professions. The door of the private house was thrown open. In every purse there was, or might be, one bright new sixpence in whose light every thought, every sight, every action looked different. Twenty years is not, as time goes, a long time; nor is a sixpenny bit a very important coin; nor can we yet draw upon biography to supply us with a picture of the lives and minds of the new-sixpenny owners. But in imagination perhaps we can see the educated man's daughter, as she issues from the shadow of the private house, and stands on the bridge which lies between the old world and the new, and asks, as she twirls the sacred coin in her hand, 'What shall I do with it? What do I see with it?' Through that light we may guess everything she saw looked different--men and women, cars and churches. The moon even, scarred as it is in fact with forgotten craters, seemed to her a white sixpence, a chaste sixpence, an altar upon which she vowed never to side with the servile, the signers-on, since it was hers to do what she liked with--the sacred sixpence that she had earned with her own hands herself. And if checking imagination with prosaic good sense, you object that to depend upon a profession is only another form of slavery, you will admit from your own experience that to depend upon a profession is a less odious form of slavery than to depend upon a father. Recall the joy with which you received your first guinea for your first brief, and the deep breath of freedom that you drew when you realized that your days of dependence upon Arthur's Education Fund were over. From that guinea, as from one of the magic pellets to which children set fire and a tree rises, all that you most value--wife, children, home--and above all that influence which now enables you to influence other men, have sprung. What would that influence be if you were still drawing £40 a year from the family purse, and for any addition to that income were dependent even upon the most benevolent of fathers? But it is needless to expatiate. Whatever the reason, whether pride, or love of freedom, or hatred of hypocrisy, you will understand the excitement with which in 1919 your sisters began to earn not a guinea but a sixpenny bit, and will not scorn that pride,


http://gutenberg.net.au/ebooks02/0200931h.html
gerry
Posted: Monday, October 24, 2016 12:43:43 PM
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oh teaAnxious
Bully_rus
Posted: Monday, October 24, 2016 1:56:26 PM
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Daemon wrote:
To depend upon a profession is a less odious form of slavery than to depend upon a father.

Virginia Woolf (1882-1941)


Interdependence makes up the fabric of life... How it might be odious?
KSPavan
Posted: Tuesday, October 25, 2016 12:14:38 AM

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Quotation of the Day

Pain like mine demands new modes of song.

Miguel de Cervantes (1547-1616)
ChristopherJohnson
Posted: Tuesday, October 25, 2016 3:05:58 AM

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Who's afraid of that big bad Virginia Woolf?
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