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it's Options
kaNNa
Posted: Monday, April 18, 2011 5:43:15 AM
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Is the Co-operative Bank's use of it's grammatically acceptable?

"KEEPING ALL YOUR EGGS IN ONE BASKET CAN NOW BE A GOOD THING.
CURRANT ACCOUNT PLUS WITH A LINKED SAVINGS ACCOUNT...from the Bank rooted in it's prlnciple."
-Co-operative Bank's advertisement on a mass-produced flyer
srirr
Posted: Monday, April 18, 2011 5:55:26 AM

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It looks like a typo. "Its" is the correct use there, which shows sense of possession. "It's" means "it is" or "it has".

thar
Posted: Monday, April 18, 2011 7:00:30 AM

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a) lots of native speakers do not understand apostrophes
b) mistakes get through proof readers.

to check if you are ever confused, substitute he:
he is, it is = he's, it's
belonging to = his, its

!!
and to be fair about how easy it is to make typos (although a bank has less excuse!)
Isaac Samuel
Posted: Monday, April 18, 2011 1:00:06 PM
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Current account plus a linked savings account or Current account with a linked savings account.

"with plus" sounds tautological.
excaelis
Posted: Monday, April 18, 2011 3:43:00 PM

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Also, just to kick this dog one more time, it should be either '...rooted in its principles.' or '...rooted in principle.' Either way it's rather an odd phrase for a bank, which institutions usually display the moral compass of vampire bats.
martyg
Posted: Monday, April 18, 2011 5:36:05 PM
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@excaelis, <Either way it's rather an odd phrase for a bank, which institutions usually display the moral compass of vampire bats.>

your comment may be a little forgiving. a recent airing on pbs showed bats (all bats) as being harmless and quite playful. looks can be deceiving but not so far as bankers are concerned.
excaelis
Posted: Monday, April 18, 2011 6:15:29 PM

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All together now :

What's the difference between a vampire bat and a banker ?


One's a bloodsucking parasite and the other's a vampire bat !


Ba-Dum-Cha !! Dancing
Ray41
Posted: Tuesday, April 19, 2011 1:38:37 AM

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Location: Orange, New South Wales, Australia

This is off topic but, is in answer to the post about 'all' bats being quite playful and harmless, which is in need of correction.
They are certainly not harmless, in fact they are downright deadly. Since 'ABL' was first being discovered in 1996 there have been several deaths in Australia as the direct result of people being bitten. DO NOT PLAY WITH BATS IN OZ
Below is only some of the information available, you will find several web sites on 'Australian bat lyssavirus' if you Google it.

Rabies & Australian bat lyssavirus
statutory requirements;
Rabies (Group A disease) must be notified immediately by telephone or fax followed by written notification within five days.

Australian bat lyssavirus (Group B disease) must be notified in writing within five days of diagnosis.
Rabies is subject to Australian quarantine.
Infectious agents
Rabies virus and Australian bat lyssavirus (ABL) are closely related members of the genus Lyssavirus.

Identification
Clinical features
Rabies is an acute viral disease of the central nervous system (CNS). CNS symptoms are preceded by a non-specific prodrome of fever, headache, malaise, anorexia, nausea and vomiting lasting one to four days. This is followed by signs of encephalitis manifested by periods of excitation and agitation leading to delirium, confusion, hallucinations and convulsions. Signs of brain stem dysfunction begin shortly after with excessive salivation and difficulty in swallowing. This produces the classical picture of ‘foaming at the mouth’.
Even with medical intervention the disease is almost invariably fatal. Death from respiratory paralysis generally occurs within two to six days of the onset of symptoms.
The criterion for a suspect rabies case is progressive encephalitis with a past history of exposure in a rabies endemic area.
The criteria for a confirmed case are a clinically compatible neurological illness and one or more positive results from the three laboratory tests described below.
Symptoms of encephalitis due to ABL include numbness, muscle weakness, collapse and coma. A confirmed case requires laboratory definitive evidence only.


intelfam
Posted: Tuesday, April 19, 2011 5:25:42 AM
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Can I just go back to the question before I die of rabies ....

It's is most confusing for native speakers as well and the mistake is very common. It seems logical that as the "principles" belong to "it" then it should be "it's". It seems that this dropping of the apostrophe (for that's what it was) only happened a couple of centuries ago. A similar thing happened to her's, as in "these are her's" and Jane Austen apparently used the "her's" form in her manuscripts. I would imagine that folk started to use apostrophes to indicate missing letters when they tried to describe regional dialects and accents in novels. Up until the time of Dr Johnson, the dictionary man, novels (which may attempt the dialect speech) were not widely distributed - only plays and poetry were printed for a long time after the introduction of mass book production - and apostrophes were used in these to drop syllables for reasons of metre. I would imagine, further, that it was a house style of some printing house producing novels, which began the process of tidying up apostrophes, but that's speculation based on a sketchy knowledge of the early printing trade... (or is the rabies in my blood stream already?)
Romany
Posted: Tuesday, April 19, 2011 12:10:40 PM
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Intelfam - you sweet talking devil, you. I do so love it when you talk like that.

I really relish getting bits of the history of English thrown in as a bonus on these threads. I remember that, even at University level, my tutor was unable clearly to explain to my satisfaction the whole "it" thing. But at last I get it! Now I can give up my rather shaky use of the apostrophe; and relying on the editing process to get me right.

Great stuff.

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