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plural of faculty-in-charge Options
ranoringo
Posted: Tuesday, October 4, 2016 4:35:25 AM
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What is the plural of faculty-in-charge? Faculties-in-charge or faculty-in-charges? Both sound strange to me.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, October 4, 2016 4:51:49 AM

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You're right. They both sound odd.

If the "Faculty In-Charge" is in charge of one faculty, then a "Faculties In-Charge" would be one person in charge of several faculties.

The several people, each in charge of one faculty, would be "Faculty In-Charges". Eh?

If you can get away with it, "Faculty I/Cs" doesn't sound bad.

If you need to be formal, then I would suggest you use "The In-Charges of the Faculties". That doesn't sound bad to me.
ranoringo
Posted: Tuesday, October 4, 2016 5:34:42 AM
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Thanks. The context of the term is "the respective faculty-in-charges of the labs have refused to take even the first step towards any kind of accountability as far as safety is concerned." Since the writer means several people who are in-charges of different labs, then going by what you say "Faculty In-charges" is not wrong. Is it so? And yes, is "faculty-in-charge" the incorrect way of writing it? Should it always be "Faculty In-charge"?
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, October 4, 2016 5:51:37 AM

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Hi Again.

Yes - 'Faculty In-Charges' is not wrong. I does not look so bad as it sounds.

The hyphens depend on your 'style'.
I think in every style there would be one between 'in' and 'charge'.

**************
I don't (just from that one sentence) understand who this is.

In my mind, the Faculty-in-charge (or Faculty In-Charge) is the person totally in charge of the whole Faculty.

faculty n
4. (Education)
a. a department within a university or college devoted to a particular branch of knowledge
b. the staff of such a department
c. chiefly US and Canadian all the teaching staff at a university, college, school, etc


A Faculty In-Charge would be the person in charge of a whole university or in charge of the Physics department (for example) - the Dean or a Professor (someone who had been lecturing for many years and had made his name known by publishing several papers showing his own original research into the subject) - it would not be a lab technician.

ranoringo
Posted: Tuesday, October 4, 2016 6:01:40 AM
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Here the writer is referring to faculty members who have been assigned the responsibility of managing the departmental labs. So what term can be used for them?
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, October 4, 2016 6:23:56 AM

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Well, if each one is in charge of one lab, he or she would be a Lab I/C or "Laboratory In-Charge".
I think that the title would more likely be something like 'Laboratory Administrator'.

If they are more than just an admin, but teach as well, the title seems to be 'Lab I/C'.

These are partial CVs from "linkedin" - a site where professionals can find jobs/connect up with others in similar jobs.

Wafa AlahmedBsc, PgD, MLS(ASCP)cm
Current - Laboratory in-charge at Central United Medical Laboratory
Past - Bsc, PgD, MLS(ASCP)cm Laboratory in-charge at HBM Laboratory, Medical Technologist at Advanced Medical Laboratory.

Alexandre ORLOFF
Geotechnical & Laboratory In-Charge chez QDVC (Q.S.C)
Current - Geotechnical & Laboratory In-Charge at QDVC (Q.S.C)
Past - Geotechnical Engineer (VIE) at Business France, Material Engineer at Vinci Construction Terrassement.
ranoringo
Posted: Tuesday, October 4, 2016 6:38:57 AM
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Thanks!
mactoria
Posted: Wednesday, October 5, 2016 1:15:37 AM
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Reading through the Forum, I found this question interesting and perplexing. I agree with previous posters, that both plurals sound and read odd, though my natural reaction as an American was that the "s" has to be put on the "faculty" and not on the "charge" due to our grammatical rules. So I did some research.

Per the Oxford Dictionary's "Oxford blog," the rules governing similar compound words (e.g. attorney general/attorneys general, mother-in-law/mothers-in-law, etc.) are considered "post-positive adjectives," meaning that they're an exception to the normal rules of grammar in which adjectives come before the noun they modify, and as such, we have to remember that the "s" is added to the noun, not the adjective. So following that rule, it would seem that "faculties-in-charge" would be the correct pluralization. However, the Oxford blog entry goes on to suggest that when in doubt, check a dictionary, as there are a number of exceptions in which the "s" is placed on the post-positive adjective instead of the noun (meaning the "s" would be on the "charge" instead)....evidently due to some kind of French influence to English grammar, something I really didn't understand. And since "faculties-in-charge" just doesn't sound right to the ear, I read the rest of the pluralization rules and examples in the blog.

Ultimately, I found one example that struck me as possibly the best solution to this unusual compound word given how clunky putting the "s" in either position sounds to the ear: change the way you say the word altogether, such as "faculty member-in-charge" which then would come out to "faculty members-in-charge" when it's pluralized. It does make the job title a bit longer, bit to me it sounds smooth and normal when you add the "s" to the "member" this way.

Not sure DragOnspeaker or other non-American speakers of English would agree with this, but thought I'd offer this suggestion.
ranoringo
Posted: Wednesday, October 5, 2016 2:44:46 AM
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faculty member-in-charge seems to be the best way out considering the perplexing nature of the word. Thanks mactoria!
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, October 5, 2016 3:35:23 AM

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Hi mactoria.

My 'objection' to your logic is that "in-charge" is the noun. The person is the in-charge of the Faculty.

"Faculty in-charge" is "The in-charge of the Faculty". "Faculty" is an attributive noun (like an adjective). He/she is an in-charge, not a 'faculty'.

"Attorney General" is the Attorney who has general overall responsibility. General is the adjective. He/she is an attorney, not a general.

*************
Here is the answer to the same question on "StackExchange" in 2014.

Quote:
"When pluralizing multiple-word terms, we often pluralize the first word, because that is where the noun resides:

one attorney at law, three attorneys at law
one mother-in-law, three brothers-in-law
one ambassador at large, three ambassadors at large
However, if the first word (or words) function as a qualifier, we pluralize the noun at the end:

one department head, two department heads
one county deputy sheriff, two county deputy sheriffs
one Juvenile Firesetter Intervention Specialist, two Juvenile Firesetter Intervention Specialists
In the case of project in-charge, in-charge is the position title, and project is a qualifier; therefore:

one project in-charge, four project in-charges
As I mentioned in an earlier comment, even if each project has only one in-charge, that won't negate the need for a plural.

Our company has five in-charges on the payroll, but only four of them are working as an in-charge right now, because we only have four projects at the moment. However, if we land that contract with Acme Aerospace next month, we'll take Brice off of Thelma's project, and he'll be the in-charge for the Acme project.
mactoria
Posted: Thursday, October 6, 2016 1:24:45 AM
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DragOnspeaker: Guess we'll have to disagree on this one. I saw the Stack Exchange posting you cited, but being unfamiliar with that internet site I checked it out and concluded it's not as authoritative as the Oxford Dictionary blog, which as I understand (hopefully correctly) references bases responses on the rules/protocols/formats of the Oxford Dictionary, a well-recognized authority. I've only been on the TFD forum less than a year so I may have missed it being as an authority, I just haven't seen it used. Also, the job title "faculty-in-charge" is unique; I googled it and found no listings, so it seems to me to be a made-up, situational job title, and it's unusual (ie not something that in the US we'd do) to refer to an individual as an "in-charge," they'd have to be in charge over something...in this case, a faculty. The job title seems to lack the referrent noun "member" to properly describe that one person is superior to a group(the faculty or a faculty group) and it thus makes things even more confusing when one goes to talk about plurals of this title. So, I concluded that the job title needs to be "faculty member(s)-in-charge" to follow common, understandable protocols for job titles, at least in the US. Ranoringo seemed to think it was a decent resolution to his problem, and since it's jodquestion, I'll go with whatever he thinks works best since the grammatical rules on this one seem to have more than one potential accurate answer.

Always interesting to dialog on fine points and unique situations, and I think sometimes there just isn't one right answer.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, October 6, 2016 6:02:19 AM

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Wow!
I worked from 1975 to 2010 in a couple of companies with headquarters in the USA - and both had 'In-Charges'

The office, local business, was headed by an Exec Director. The divisions were headed by Secretaries (Treasury Secretary, Technical Secretary and so on), departments within the divisions had Directors (Treasury had Director of Income, Disbursements Director and so on), Sections within Departments were headed by I/Cs - Audits In-Charge, Mail invoicing In-Charge).

I thought it was a normal American organisational title (or, being an American thing, it would be an organizational title).

This is a note from English Forums.com, which may explain something:
In India, Bangladesh, and Pakistan it is correct to say "the in-charge" or "the in charge", meaning the person who is in charge of a department or business. This term is used by millions of English speakers in Asia; nevertheless, it is not used at all in the United States and, if used, will confuse people. It's possible that this term may have been used by the British in Asia in the 1800's.

And from Google Books - almost all the books which use "The In-Charge" as a post-title are written by Indian civil-servants and accountants.
A few from other countries here:
"Where the goods are seized, the In-Charge of the check-post or the officer empowered under rule 52 shall serve a notice . . ."
". . .shall produce, or cause to be produced, the portions marked 'original' before the In-Charge of the exit post."

"Sales Tax Cases - 1996"

"Tracings of Records or Documents shall not be made by any person without specific permission from the in charge of the room."

French Activities in California - An Archival Calendar-guide

"The In Charge position is paid in pay range 6, while the Attendant I classification is allocated to pay range 5."

Robert G. Polasek from "Civil Service Regulations.gov.uk"

Romany
Posted: Sunday, October 9, 2016 10:45:34 AM
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I've been stymied right from the beginning of this one. Obviously it has nothing to do with the word 'faculty' meaning aptitude. So the only other usage would be as a group noun i.e. The Faculty of Arts.(All those people engaged in Arts) The Faculty and Staff. (All those who have tenure and those who don't.)

So to me the Faculty in charge of something would be ALL the people in a particular faculty. It therefore makes no sense to me hyphenated. If you have MORE THAN one particular Faculty (group of people) in charge of something, then you'd have lots of different groups of disparate people in charge...which would be a rather anarchical concept: - dozens and dozens of people running round claiming they were in charge!

Which would explain, (to me, anyway) why there's no reference to a Faculty-in-charge. Or any provision for a plural form. As this particular sentence deals with a group of people in charge of laboratories for their own department, why would other faculties be included? Surely the Faculty of Science (for example) is in charge of their own laboratories? If one particular person/splinter group from the Faculty of Science is put in charge of the laboratories, then the only way to express it would indeed be 'members of The Faculty of Science' or 'a group from The Faculty of Science'.

While naming a person's position as 'the in-charge' may well be a facet of Anglo-Indian speech, in any other language it just sounds like pidgin or baby-talk to my ears. It's not something I've ever come across in either BE or even AE so far, but I find the whole idea of "Faculties-in-charge" does my head in!
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Sunday, October 9, 2016 3:22:02 PM

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Well then.
This is obviously a 'post title' which I have been exposed to, but which is not in common usage.

Quote:
Here the writer is referring to faculty members who have been assigned the responsibility of managing the departmental labs. So what term can be used for them?


Probably the normal English title would be Faculty Member In Charge of the Laboratory. Plural - Faculty Members In Charge of the Laboratories.

In India and surrounds, and in the two American companies I worked with, they were "In-charge(s)" of the labs.
ranoringo
Posted: Monday, October 17, 2016 10:37:37 AM
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The discussion on this topic has really been useful. One thing for sure is faculty-in-charge is incorrect. "Faculty member-in-charge can be provisional. Faculty Member In Charge of the Laboratories is correct, though a bit long. Lab I/Cs seems good enough if the fact that the persons concerned are faculty members is not essential. The usage is probably situational.
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