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TheParser
Posted: Saturday, September 24, 2016 4:24:55 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/21/2012
Posts: 4,668
Neurons: 22,062
"[A]n administrator in [New York City's] Education Department [has denounced] a reading-skills exam that used an extract from Edith Wharton's Age of Innocence; the passage in question begins, 'It was generally agreed that the Countess Olenska had "lost her looks" '; the complaint is that 'any girl taking the exam' will experience the mention of losing your looks as a 'psychic punch' that impairs concentration on the rest of the exam." [my emphasis]


--David Bromwich, "What are we allowed to say?," London Review of Books September 22, 2016.
Verbatim
Posted: Sunday, September 25, 2016 12:14:11 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/3/2012
Posts: 2,190
Neurons: 247,379
Lost her looks? That is so indelicate as to justify a petition to withdraw The Pulitzer Prize (for Fiction) from the first woman to have received it.
And for good measure burn all existing copies of The Age of Innocence to safeguard against any contemporary girl falling victim to "psychic punch".
Besides, there is no diversity in the novel--only one instance of casual straight sex, and that after long deliberation--but no LGBTQ pride.
That alone impairs concentration on what the rest of the book is all about.

The nerve of this Edith Wharton! Huh?
Hope123
Posted: Sunday, September 25, 2016 10:33:18 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/23/2015
Posts: 9,174
Neurons: 52,453
Location: Kitchener, Ontario, Canada
Verbatim wrote:
Lost her looks? That is so indelicate as to justify a petition to withdraw The Pulitzer Prize (for Fiction) from the first woman to have received it.
And for good measure burn all existing copies of The Age of Innocence to safeguard against any contemporary girl falling victim to "psychic punch".
Besides, there is no diversity in the novel--only one instance of casual straight sex, and that after long deliberation--but no LGBTQ pride.
That alone impairs concentration on what the rest of the book is all about.

The nerve of this Edith Wharton! Huh?


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