mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest
Nocturnal cramps Options
Adriaticus
Posted: Thursday, April 14, 2011 2:37:00 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/25/2010
Posts: 240
Neurons: 726
Location: Atlantis
i've just learnt with disappointment that it is not clear the origin of this painful disorder hence it is not easy to alleviate or prevent it. I've been suffering from this since many years but lately it got worse. Probably it depends from the fact I have to sit for most of my working hours. It is quite stressing to wake up in the middle of the night in deep pain; usually located in the calf area. Doctor gave me some magnesium+potassium powder to drink before sleep and it's helping but not completely solving the problem. Anyone experienced the same?
blue2
Posted: Thursday, April 14, 2011 3:23:47 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/25/2010
Posts: 2,552
Neurons: 23,044
Location: Préveza, Epirus, Greece
I've had them, but it hasn't happened in a while. I remember two or three times when I nearly fainted from the pain. Sometimes if I start to stretch my legs when in bed I feel a cramp start to come on so I avoid that. I don't know if exercising more has helped. I only took magnesium a few times. My sister has problems with leg cramps and takes magnesium, but she also heard that Gatorade helps, and started drinking it. She says it helps. I think it has something to do with the electrolytes.
Tovarish
Posted: Thursday, April 14, 2011 6:32:59 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/2/2009
Posts: 11,101
Neurons: 39,933
Location: Booligal, New South Wales, Australia
I have also had excruciating leg cramps, and have found it is related to dehydration.

Ice packs on the cramp spot helps too.

Potassium tablets help immensely, taken with lots of water.

All of the above suggestions are active parts of electrolytes, so we are all on the same track.

Bananas also have a great amount of potassium.
GabhSigenod
Posted: Thursday, April 14, 2011 7:50:02 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 12/22/2010
Posts: 2,371
Neurons: 149,736
Location: Mulroog, Connaught, Ireland
An acquaintance suffered from this malady and sought relief
by hanging upside-down for a spell in the evening like a bat.
Now I'm afraid to ask, though he seems taller.

pedro
Posted: Thursday, April 14, 2011 8:38:48 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/21/2009
Posts: 13,057
Neurons: 63,022
I would be inclined to go down the physiotherapy route. Many complaints relate to poor posture and hence poor circulation, often in the working environment.
Dubai
Posted: Thursday, April 14, 2011 11:16:08 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/16/2011
Posts: 405
Neurons: 34,216
Very informative and helpful views of the forum members on the topic.
Isaac Samuel
Posted: Thursday, April 14, 2011 11:37:55 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/2/2009
Posts: 674
Neurons: 1,222
Location: United States
I get hit once or twice a month during winter, while asleep.I slap the affected area of the calf muscle and give it a gentle but deep massage for few seconds, and it is gone. I never experienced it when standing up or when awake.Touch wood,It is not chronic enough to seek remedy.
redgriffin
Posted: Thursday, April 14, 2011 11:55:10 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/3/2010
Posts: 662
Neurons: 160,127
Location: Portland, Oregon, United States
I would go with the idea of dehydration I would start to drink more water or Sports Drinks at night along with Magnesium and Potassium tablet in the morning and in about a week to ten days you will begin to have relief. The Results for me was greater skin elasticity, I look younger and I didn't feel as run down as before.
kaNNa
Posted: Thursday, April 14, 2011 12:02:31 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/30/2010
Posts: 412
Neurons: 20,739

Calf trigger points can be provoked by a forceful contraction when the muscle is in a shortened position, or if the muscle gets fatigued or chilled.

Your calf muscles have an important job through the day (other than helping you walk and stand upright.) They also work as a pump to squeeze blood back up veins in your legs. At night when you are sleeping, this mechanism is also at rest, possibly causing a lack of oxygen to the area. This might help explain the reason these cramps seem to occur at night.

Treating a nocturnal calf cramp is important; otherwise it could be in spasm for 30 minutes or more! Ouch!

STRETCH
Start by stretching the calf out. You can do this by drawing your toes towards your nose, with knee straight (if you are sitting up in bed), or by standing facing a wall, with hands on the wall at shoulder level, and the leg to be stretched behind you (full foot on the floor, knee straight), with your other leg in front (foot flat on floor, knee slightly bent). Then gently lean your body toward the wall, keeping the back knee straight, foot on the floor, and bending at the knee on the leg in front. Go just until you feel a gentle stretch, and then hold, breathing deeply, for a minute or two. Then stretch the other side too, just to keep things even!

HEAT
Warmth is great too, and might help you get back to sleep after the episode! A warm buddy, heated up and placed on your calf will help with blood flow, and keep the muscle from getting chilled. You can also heat your calves before bed, if calf cramping is a common occurrence for you.

POSITION
At night, try to avoid having your feet in the pointed position. This can happen if you are sleeping on your stomach, with your feet pointing down the bed, or lying on your back with heavy covers pulling the toes down. You may need to adjust your covers, or even have your feet out of the covers (with some socks on to keep ‘em warm). If you are a back sleeper you can try putting a pillow or rolled blanket at your feet, to stop them from pointing down. If you are a tummy sleeper, you can place a pillow under your shins (like I do on the massage table), or even have your feet hang off the end of the bed.

MASSAGE
Relieving calf trigger points can go a long way to alleviating nocturnal calf cramps. Focus on the medial (inside) of the gastrocnemius muscle, as trigger points here seem to be the most common culprits. You can use a rolling pin to roll up the muscle, and hold on the tender points until they release (please be gentle). You can also use a tennis ball or Kong, or just knead your calves with your hands. Or come in and I’ll do it for you!

OTHER
Low potassium and calcium levels are possible factors in muscle cramping, as well as vitamin E. Please talk to your doctor before taking supplements.

penelope
Posted: Thursday, April 14, 2011 1:04:48 PM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 4/14/2011
Posts: 2
Neurons: 6
Location: Brazil
I used have a lot of crambs when I swimming, but today i take a lot of water and i never more had.
bluecloud
Posted: Thursday, April 14, 2011 1:23:27 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/14/2010
Posts: 361
Neurons: 25
Is this "Restless Leg Syndrome"?
QuzySue
Posted: Thursday, April 14, 2011 1:37:38 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/18/2010
Posts: 43
Neurons: 129
Location: United States
I studied ballet and get these cramps if i stretch my leg and foot. Worse pain is the cramp in the arch of my foot. My husband tells me to stand up and walk it off. It seems to help. :) I will use these methods and see if they help. Thanks for the info.
Tovarish
Posted: Thursday, April 14, 2011 8:30:27 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/2/2009
Posts: 11,101
Neurons: 39,933
Location: Booligal, New South Wales, Australia
QuzySue, a very sympathetic husband there, but you really do have to keep moving.

Around and around the house in the middle of the night, with a bag of frozen peas on the cramp.

Not a good look, but it works
HWNN1961
Posted: Thursday, April 14, 2011 8:42:27 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/13/2010
Posts: 3,494
Neurons: 9,763
Try this:

Have 1 8oz glass of water every hour for the last three hours before bed. Along with this, have a bananna for a before-bed snack. Might help.
jcbarros
Posted: Thursday, April 14, 2011 9:28:08 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/14/2010
Posts: 2,363
Neurons: 9,377
Do care about your spine. Columna vitae.
ellana
Posted: Friday, April 15, 2011 3:18:12 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 12/19/2010
Posts: 673
Neurons: 127,363
Location: Roquefort, Provence-Alpes-Cote d'Azur, France
There's evidence that taking Vit E daily helps nocturnal leg cramps which is not the same as restless leg syndrome.
I've heard that some people keep tonic water containing quinine sulphate at bedside. My ex who is also a MD used to rattle the bed at night with his cramps and came up with this solotion which I believe he still lives by, many years later. Have a look at this link.
http://www.wikihow.com/Get-Rid-of-Muscle-Cramps-with-Minerals
Ohomebug
Posted: Saturday, April 16, 2011 12:01:17 AM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 4/15/2011
Posts: 1
Neurons: 3
Location: United States
Adriaticus wrote:
i've just learnt with disappointment that it is not clear the origin of this painful disorder hence it is not easy to alleviate or prevent it. I've been suffering from this since many years but lately it got worse. Probably it depends from the fact I have to sit for most of my working hours. It is quite stressing to wake up in the middle of the night in deep pain; usually located in the calf area. Doctor gave me some magnesium+potassium powder to drink before sleep and it's helping but not completely solving the problem. Anyone experienced the same?


That sounds miserable, and I'm willing to bet that it's restless leg syndrome. There is no relief except to get up and walk around, or if there is someone kind enough to massage your legs the relief would feel wonderful! There are some medications that could help, but you'd have to talk that over with a Dr. Either way, I hope you find some relief, soon!
Tovarish
Posted: Saturday, April 16, 2011 12:26:05 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/2/2009
Posts: 11,101
Neurons: 39,933
Location: Booligal, New South Wales, Australia
Is it Zinc & Magnesium for Restless legs?,

some thing in the memory bank tells me it is so, or maybe it was for one of my race horses.
Adriaticus
Posted: Wednesday, April 20, 2011 2:32:28 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/25/2010
Posts: 240
Neurons: 726
Location: Atlantis
Yes and it seems working for me too. It obviously gets worse during periods of intensive training, like it's happening now.
I use to take magnesium+potassium twice per week and every night before sleep I drink a glass of Gatorade. the cramps so far disappeared and I can sleep the whole night quietly.
blue2
Posted: Wednesday, April 20, 2011 3:06:59 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/25/2010
Posts: 2,552
Neurons: 23,044
Location: Préveza, Epirus, Greece
Good to hear something's working and you can sleep the night through. Let's hope it stays that way.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Wednesday, April 20, 2011 8:10:33 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/21/2009
Posts: 43,136
Neurons: 598,978
Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
Eat rye bread!



[image not available]

Adriaticus
Posted: Wednesday, April 20, 2011 8:14:05 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/25/2010
Posts: 240
Neurons: 726
Location: Atlantis
I wish I could JJ ! In the past 2 years I developed an intolerance to most cereals. It is going back to normal but still cannot eat it on regular basis but just once a week or so.
Cat
Posted: Wednesday, April 20, 2011 2:21:46 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/10/2010
Posts: 967
Neurons: 194,017
Location: Waterloo, Ontario, Canada
JJ: I'm chuckling because the round loaves in the front look like giant molasses cookies which are one of my favorites and now I'm going to have to bake since they've ignited my appetite! Applause
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.