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'sun rises at east' Options
kaNNa
Posted: Sunday, April 10, 2011 7:07:20 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/30/2010
Posts: 412
Neurons: 20,474
The sun rises in the east.
Can we also say?
1. The sun rises from the east.
2. The sun rises at East.
If not, why?
thar
Posted: Sunday, April 10, 2011 7:16:01 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 22,793
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in the east is a place - it is where the event happens

from the east is direction of movement, not where it happens- the sun rises in the east and moves from east to west

and you never use at east, for any usage, because there is generally a choice of in or at for the general location where something happens (you can use in as well for inside, but for the whole thing, you use in or at)
in a town
at a house
in France
at home
in the east
at the horizon
GabhSigenod
Posted: Sunday, April 10, 2011 10:44:03 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 12/22/2010
Posts: 2,371
Neurons: 149,736
Location: Mulroog, Connaught, Ireland
Understandable usage.
kaNNa
Posted: Sunday, April 10, 2011 12:24:51 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/30/2010
Posts: 412
Neurons: 20,474
thar wrote:
in the east is a place - it is where the event happens

from the east is direction of movement, not where it happens- the sun rises in the east and moves from east to west

and you never use at east, for any usage, because there is generally a choice of in or at for the general location where something happens (you can use in as well for inside, but for the whole thing, you use in or at)
in a town
at a house
in France
at home
in the east
at the horizon

thanks a lot thar,clearly explained.Applause Applause
thar
Posted: Sunday, April 10, 2011 12:30:09 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 22,793
Neurons: 92,591
you are welcome Angel
Chrystall
Posted: Sunday, April 10, 2011 4:21:07 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 12/15/2010
Posts: 38
Neurons: 114
Location: Greece
Thar - you are absolutely amazing!!!

Bashou
Posted: Sunday, April 10, 2011 4:30:16 PM
Rank: Member

Joined: 4/10/2011
Posts: 87
Neurons: 264
thar wrote:
in the east is a place - it is where the event happens

from the east is direction of movement, not where it happens- the sun rises in the east and moves from east to west

and you never use at east, for any usage, because there is generally a choice of in or at for the general location where something happens (you can use in as well for inside, but for the whole thing, you use in or at)
in a town
at a house
in France
at home
in the east
at the horizon


Hello Thar
Could you explain "at the horizon",please? Is there any difference btw "at the horizon" and "on the horizon"?
Thank you!
blahblah
Posted: Monday, April 11, 2011 3:17:10 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/26/2010
Posts: 197
Neurons: 570
Location: United States
Bashou wrote: Could you explain "at the horizon",please? Is there any difference btw "at the horizon" and "on the horizon"?


There's a boat out on the horizon.

Hope is on the horizon...

The sun appears to dive into the sea at the horizon.


When the phrase is metaphorical or illustrative, we more often use "on the horizon."

When talking literally about the horizon, as if it were a fixed place, you will hear "at the horizon."

lenam
Posted: Monday, April 11, 2011 3:25:22 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/22/2010
Posts: 1,282
Neurons: 3,816
Location: India
In school I have been taught about the use of "at" and "in" as: "at" a small place and "in" a big city. Is it true, Thar?
thar
Posted: Monday, April 11, 2011 5:12:24 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 22,793
Neurons: 92,591
lenam wrote:
In school I have been taught about the use of "at" and "in" as: "at" a small place and "in" a big city. Is it true, Thar?


certainly that does seem to agree with the examples that came to me, and it makes sense, in that if something is big you are in it.

I am changing planes in Chicago
I am changing planes at Chicago...
I am changing planes at Chicago airport

but
I got off the train at Chicago
I changed trains at Chicago

I think as a general rule it might be true, but also very dependent on the type of phrase it is used with.
At for specific, in for conceptual. Also, some BE/AE and some where it is just interchangeable
I studied at X College
I learned a lot in college
I study at a school
I learn in school (AE)

still not sure
Bashou
Posted: Monday, April 11, 2011 9:21:12 AM
Rank: Member

Joined: 4/10/2011
Posts: 87
Neurons: 264
blahblah wrote:
Bashou wrote: Could you explain "at the horizon",please? Is there any difference btw "at the horizon" and "on the horizon"?


There's a boat out on the horizon.

Hope is on the horizon...

The sun appears to dive into the sea at the horizon.


When the phrase is metaphorical or illustrative, we more often use "on the horizon."

When talking literally about the horizon, as if it were a fixed place, you will hear "at the horizon."



Thanks a lot!!!
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