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off vs from Options
darcy606
Posted: Sunday, August 7, 2016 12:17:21 PM
Rank: Member

Joined: 8/25/2013
Posts: 49
Neurons: 3,304
Hi, I would like to know the differences between off and from, when both of them are right to use and when only one of them is right to use.

My number is the number I'm calling you off/from.
I'm moving out of/from my current place next week.
I'm getting off from work/getting off work at 4 today.
You are coming off the road/off from the road if you keep driving forward.
Thank you.
Take the ball off/from him.

pitulush
Posted: Friday, August 12, 2016 8:21:39 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/30/2012
Posts: 878
Neurons: 465,731
Location: Bucharest, Bucuresti, Romania
darcy606 wrote:
Hi, I would like to know the differences between off and from, when both of them are right to use and when only one of them is right to use.

darcy, I see this hasn't been answered. I can't really help you, but I'd like to know the answer too.

My number is the number I'm calling you off/from. "from" sounds better to me
I'm moving out of/from my current place next week. both?
I'm getting off from work/getting off work at 4 today. both?
You are coming off the road/off from the road if you keep driving forward. I think just "off"
Thank you.
Take the ball off/from him. both, but they have slightly different meanings?



Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, August 12, 2016 8:48:12 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 33,153
Neurons: 207,936
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
The main differences here are "written formal" and "informal" and "spoken formal", "spoken informal" and "slang".

Generally "from" would be a bit more formal than "off" - though there are standard phrases using 'off'.

My number is the number I'm calling you off/from.
"Off" is slang, "from" is spoken informal and formal and is always used in writing.

I'm moving out of/from my current place next week.
"Moving out of" is a standard phrase meaning "changing residence from".
Both 'moving out of' and 'moving from' can be used interchangeably.


I'm getting off from work/getting off work at 4 today.
The normal phrase is "getting off work", not "getting off from work".
Maybe it's American to say "getting off from", I don't know.


You are coming off the road/off from the road if you keep driving forward.
The tenses are a bit odd, but "coming off" is normal.
You do not say "off from" or "off of" - it is redundant.
You will come off the road if you keep driving forward.


Take the ball off/from him.
Very formal written would be 'take the ball from him'.
Informal written and almost all spoken usages would be "take the ball off him".




Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
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