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Vasco da Gama Sets Sail on First Direct European Voyage to India (1497) Options
Daemon
Posted: Friday, July 8, 2016 12:00:00 AM
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Vasco da Gama Sets Sail on First Direct European Voyage to India (1497)

In 1497, da Gama began his epochal voyage to India, becoming the first European to journey there directly by sea. With four vessels, he rounded the Cape of Good Hope, passed the easternmost point reached by Bartolomeu Dias in 1488, continued up the coast of Africa to Malindi, and sailed across the Indian Ocean to Calicut. His voyage opened up a way for Europe to reach the Indies and marked the beginning of the Portuguese Empire. For what brutal methods was da Gama known during his travels? More...
MelissaMe
Posted: Friday, July 8, 2016 10:12:08 AM

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Next time you are in the spice aisle, stand and stare at the cinnamon and peppers, especially and contemplate the struggles and deaths early explorers endured in the past to bring those items to European tables.

And how easily those items are available to you today! Think
Gary98
Posted: Friday, July 8, 2016 12:03:52 PM

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The beginning of world-wide rampaging?
Anatolian
Posted: Friday, July 8, 2016 3:33:09 PM

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Quote:
On his second voyage, Vasco da Gama inflicted acts of cruelty upon competing traders and local inhabitants, which sealed his notoriety in India. During his second voyage to Calicut, da Gama intercepted a ship of Muslim pilgrims at Madayi travelling from Calicut to Mecca. Described in detail by eyewitness Thomé Lopes and chronicler Gaspar Correia as one that is unequalled in cold-blooded cruelty, da Gama looted the ship with over 400 pilgrims on board including 50 women, locked in the passengers, the owner and an ambassador from Egypt and burnt them to death. They offered their wealth which 'could ransom all the Christian slaves in the Kingdom of Fez and much more' but were not spared. Da Gama looked on through the porthole and saw the women bringing up their gold and jewels and holding up their babies to beg for mercy.'

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