mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest
I never could have done what I have done, without the habits of punctuality, order, and diligence, without the determination... Options
Daemon
Posted: Saturday, June 25, 2016 12:00:00 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/7/2009
Posts: 32,454
Neurons: 96,540
Location: Inside Farlex computers
I never could have done what I have done, without the habits of punctuality, order, and diligence, without the determination to concentrate myself on one object at a time.

Charles Dickens (1812-1870)
KSPavan
Posted: Saturday, June 25, 2016 1:15:05 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/28/2015
Posts: 11,502
Neurons: 4,437,166
Location: Kolkata, Bengal, India
Charles Dickens/Quotes

Have a heart that never hardens, and a temper that never tires, and a touch that never hurts.

Reflect upon your present blessings -- of which every man has many -- not on your past misfortunes, of which all men have some.

No one is useless in this world who lightens the burdens of another.

It was the best of times, it was the worst of times.

There are books of which the backs and covers are by far the best parts.

The pain of parting is nothing to the joy of meeting again.

It is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done; it is a far, far better rest that I go to, than I have ever known.

I will honor Christmas in my heart, and try to keep it all the year.

We need never be ashamed of our tears.

Subdue your appetites, my dears, and you've conquered human nature.
juno23
Posted: Saturday, June 25, 2016 8:51:32 AM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 7/1/2015
Posts: 39
Neurons: 181,353
Location: Managua, Managua, Nicaragua
Just reading this quote makes feel already tired. Next.
monamagda
Posted: Saturday, June 25, 2016 1:34:13 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/4/2014
Posts: 8,243
Neurons: 6,735,293
Location: Bogotá, Bogota D.C., Colombia

Context from: "David Copperfield" by Charles Dickens

CHAPTER 42: MISCHIEF


I feel as if it were not for me to record, even though this manuscript is intended for no eyes but mine, how hard I worked at that tremendous short–hand, and all improvement appertaining to it, in my sense of responsibility to Dora and her aunts. I will only add, to what I have already written of my perseverance at this time of my life, and of a patient and continuous energy which then began to be matured within me, and which I know to be the strong part of my character, if it have any strength at all, that there, on looking back, I find the source of my success. I have been very fortunate in worldly matters; many men have worked much harder, and not succeeded half so well; but I never could have done what I have done, without the habits of punctuality, order, and diligence, without the determination to concentrate myself on one object at a time, no matter how quickly its successor should come upon its heels, which I then formed. Heaven knows I write this, in no spirit of self–laudation. The man who reviews his own life, as I do mine, in going on here, from page to page, had need to have been a good man indeed, if he would be spared the sharp consciousness of many talents neglected, many opportunities wasted, many erratic and perverted feelings constantly at war within his breast, and defeating him. I do not hold one natural gift, I dare say, that I have not abused. My meaning simply is, that whatever I have tried to do in life, I have tried with all my heart to do well; that whatever I have devoted myself to, I have devoted myself to completely; that in great aims and in small, I have always been thoroughly in earnest. I have never believed it possible that any natural or improved ability can claim immunity from the companionship of the steady, plain, hard–working qualities, and hope to gain its end. There is no such thing as such fulfilment on this earth. Some happy talent, and some fortunate opportunity, may form the two sides of the ladder on which some men mount, but the rounds of that ladder must be made of stuff to stand wear and tear; and there is no substitute for thorough–going, ardent, and sincere earnestness. Never to put one hand to anything, on which I could throw my whole self; and never to affect depreciation of my work, whatever it was; I find, now, to have been my golden rules.


http://etc.usf.edu/lit2go/166/david-copperfield/3136/chapter-42-mischief/
ChristopherJohnson
Posted: Saturday, June 25, 2016 3:04:29 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/27/2014
Posts: 2,472
Neurons: 2,026,809
Location: Tbilisi, T'bilisi, Georgia
May sound banal to some, still you can achieve nothing without punctuality and order.
Bully_rus
Posted: Saturday, June 25, 2016 4:56:47 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/26/2013
Posts: 3,379
Neurons: 332,717
Location: Minsk, Minskaya Voblasts', Belarus
Daemon wrote:
I never could have done what I have done, without the habits of punctuality, order, and diligence, without the determination to concentrate myself on one object at a time.

Charles Dickens (1812-1870)


Since then the situation is only getting worse: the range of choices widens day by day...
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.