mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest
The rain fell alike upon the just and upon the unjust, and for nothing was there a why and a wherefore. Options
Daemon
Posted: Thursday, June 23, 2016 12:00:00 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/7/2009
Posts: 31,869
Neurons: 94,785
Location: Inside Farlex computers
The rain fell alike upon the just and upon the unjust, and for nothing was there a why and a wherefore.

W. Somerset Maugham (1874-1965)
KSPavan
Posted: Thursday, June 23, 2016 1:38:55 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/28/2015
Posts: 11,502
Neurons: 4,364,788
Location: Kolkata, Bengal, India
W. Somerset Maugham/Quotes

There are three rules for writing a novel. Unfortunately, no one knows what they are.

We are not the same persons this year as last; nor are those we love. It is a happy chance if we, changing, continue to love a changed person.

It's a funny thing about life; if you refuse to accept anything but the best, you very often get it.

It is an illusion that youth is happy, an illusion of those who have lost it.

Excess on occasion is exhilarating. It prevents moderation from acquiring the deadening effect of a habit.

My own belief is that there is hardly anyone whose sexual life, if it were broadcast, would not fill the world at large with surprise and horror.

Death is a very dull, dreary affair, and my advice to you is to have nothing whatsoever to do with it.

People ask for criticism, but they only want praise.

Money is like a sixth sense without which you cannot make a complete use of the other five.

It is not true that suffering ennobles the character; happiness does that sometimes, but suffering, for the most part, makes men petty and vindictive.
Bully_rus
Posted: Thursday, June 23, 2016 2:22:54 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/26/2013
Posts: 3,311
Neurons: 317,956
Location: Minsk, Minskaya Voblasts', Belarus
Even though it's raining cats and dogs - the why and wherefore are great questions to ask if they help to move/look ahead and not backwards...
juno23
Posted: Thursday, June 23, 2016 9:04:35 AM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 7/1/2015
Posts: 38
Neurons: 155,119
Location: Managua, Managua, Nicaragua
I like the rain because it refreshing after a hot, humid day down here.
Anatolian
Posted: Thursday, June 23, 2016 11:28:43 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/6/2009
Posts: 144
Neurons: 79,198
Location: Keçiören, Ankara, Turkey
Daemon wrote:
The rain fell alike upon the just and upon the unjust, and for nothing was there a why and a wherefore.

W. Somerset Maugham (1874-1965)


Because there is no such thing as justice in nature.
gerry
Posted: Thursday, June 23, 2016 3:23:14 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/21/2009
Posts: 535
Neurons: 291,011
Location: Phoenix, Arizona, United States
Only nature is blind to exception unlike man and politiciansShhh
Virginia Lathan
Posted: Thursday, June 23, 2016 7:52:41 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/9/2015
Posts: 121
Neurons: 5,980
Location: Chicago, Illinois, United States
Reminds me of the time Matthew’s mom evicted him from the family home because he was wasting away his days and not contributing to the good of the family. He ended up having no place to go, so he spent the night on the shore of a local lagoon, sleeping under the stars and the most perfect mist of a rain you can imagine. His girlfriend Cecily was with him. The whole event was surreal and wildly romantic. He so much wanted to do it again. But the next night the mist was there, but Cecily was not. So Matthew was alone; the magic was gone. The whole event was now excruciatingly unsettling.

So rain just falls, and how you react to it—as with all things—is what makes it friend or foe. That’s true whether you’re just or unjust.
monamagda
Posted: Thursday, June 23, 2016 8:27:11 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/4/2014
Posts: 8,115
Neurons: 6,525,365
Location: Bogotá, Bogota D.C., Colombia

Context from : "Of Human Bondage"

Chapter CVI


Philip asked himself desperately what was the use of living at all. It all seemed inane. It was the same with Cronshaw: it was quite unimportant that he had lived; he was dead and forgotten, his book of poems sold in remainder by second-hand booksellers; his life seemed to have served nothing except to give a pushing journalist occasion to write an article in a review. And Philip cried out in his soul:

"What is the use of it?"

The effort was so incommensurate with the result. The bright hopes of youth had to be paid for at such a bitter price of disillusionment. Pain and disease and unhappiness weighed down the scale so heavily. What did it all mean? He thought of his own life, the high hopes with which he had entered upon it, the limitations which his body forced upon him, his friendlessness, and the lack of affection which had surrounded his youth. He did not know that he had ever done anything but what seemed best to do, and what a cropper he had come! Other men, with no more advantages than he, succeeded, and others again, with many more, failed. It seemed pure chance. The rain fell alike upon the just and upon the unjust, and for nothing was there a why and a wherefore.

http://www.online-literature.com/maugham/of-human-bondage/106/


ChristopherJohnson
Posted: Friday, June 24, 2016 1:11:01 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/27/2014
Posts: 2,472
Neurons: 2,005,047
Location: Tbilisi, T'bilisi, Georgia
The quote contains an allusion to the Gospel. As a matter of fact, rain falling alike upon just and unjust is not about nature or even chance, but rather about God. At least the excerpt from the Gospel (Matthew 5:45) refers to God.
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.