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more money than all of them Options
azz
Posted: Monday, June 6, 2016 4:19:59 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/15/2014
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a. Patricia has more money than every one of them.
b. Patricia has more money than each of them.
c. Patricia has more money than all of them.


Which sentence is telling us
1. Patricia has more money than all of them put together.
and which sentence is telling us
2. Patricia has more money than any one of them.
?

Many thanks.
thar
Posted: Monday, June 6, 2016 4:39:57 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
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It is not that precise. You would give more information. If you want to say something this dramatic, you embellish it. You make it the main point of the sentence. You don't leave it to the technicalities of grammar.

Also, context is king. The situation would show if they are all rich, or the group is rich - ie if having more money that each person is actually an important point to raise, or just having more money than the whole group.

eg, you might say, as your explanations say:

She has more money that any single one of them.

She has more money than all of them put together.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, June 6, 2016 4:58:32 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 34,588
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hello azz!

I agree with thar, but just to answer very directly your question -

(a) and (b) definitely say the same as (2)
(c) says the same as (1), but may be understood to mean (2) (if someone were not listening intently).
PureBlueLight
Posted: Monday, June 6, 2016 5:45:43 AM

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Location: Portimão, Faro, Portugal
The belief in money is a mental illness, for money does not exist.
Hui Gabriel
Posted: Monday, June 6, 2016 6:48:05 AM

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Joined: 3/2/2016
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Location: Hong Lok Yuen, Hong Kong
money is money
keangal
Posted: Monday, June 6, 2016 7:22:15 AM

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Location: Montego Bay, Saint James, Jamaica
Think
NKM
Posted: Monday, June 6, 2016 12:34:15 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/14/2015
Posts: 5,266
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Location: Corinth, New York, United States
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Hello azz!

I agree with thar, but just to answer very directly your question -

(a) and (b) definitely say the same as (2)
(c) says the same as (1), but may be understood to mean (2) (if someone were not listening intently).

══════════════════════════════════════════════

I won't disagree with any of this, but I will say that "more money than every one of them" sounds strange to me.

I think "than any one of them" (or just "than any of them") would be more appropriate, and clearer as well.

Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, June 7, 2016 9:45:41 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 34,588
Neurons: 230,637
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hello NKM.

Yes - they do not sound 'familiar' - the individual phrases in the sentences are not 'ones which are used together a lot'.

It's hard to explain, as every sentence is unique and 'individually crafted' when we speak, but certain phrases are 'popular' or not, some 'unpopular' ones sound a little odd, just because they are unfamiliar.

I'd probably use the same as thar does.

She has more money that any one of them.
She has more money than all of them put together.

Wilmar (USA) 1M
Posted: Tuesday, June 7, 2016 10:54:04 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

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Location: Vinton, Iowa, United States
She has more money than each one of them.
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