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The Road to Hell is.... Options
Alias
Posted: Wednesday, March 9, 2011 2:10:54 AM
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"The Road to Hell is Paved with Good Intentions"..

My dear grey haired mother used to say this ....she is an agnosto/atheist (smiles) What did she mean?

And do you have some witty or interesting saying that your mum or Dad or other influential person used to (or still does) use? Would you like to share it here?

Gold, Blue and Silver Stars up for grabs and special mentions for off the wallDrool or missed the point effortsEh? ...
kitten
Posted: Wednesday, March 9, 2011 2:52:59 AM
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Well-intended acts can have disastrous results, as in She tried to help by defending Dad's position and they haven't spoken since--the road to hell is paved with good intentions.

This proverbial idiom probably derives from a similar statement by St. Bernard of Clairvaux about 1150, L'enfer est plein de bonnes volontés ou désirs ("Hell is full of good intentions or wishes"), and has been repeated ever since. [Late 1500s] <<<<<< www.answers.com

5. an archaic word for meaning, intentness,
<<<< TFD


I always thought is meant that you needed to follow and complete thought with action or it was all for naught.

No sense telling anyone what you intend to do to help them if you don't follow through.

As always there will be more thoughts.

time for sleep >^,,^<


TALBUIXE
Posted: Wednesday, March 9, 2011 2:58:06 AM

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Location: Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain
Here is my contribution:

My funny uncle used to say this… Every time the bills are smaller and the amounts bigger.

(Of course, this is a free translation of “Cada vez los recibos son más pequeños y las cantidades más grandes”)
offroad
Posted: Wednesday, March 9, 2011 6:11:40 AM
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Here is my 2 cents worth:

For every smelly foot there is an old boot.

Do you know its meaning?Angel
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Wednesday, March 9, 2011 6:15:42 AM

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Barking dogs don't clack.
Alias
Posted: Wednesday, March 9, 2011 7:50:49 AM
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In reverse order. JJ wrote: "Barking dogs don't clack"

JJ I dont get it! It must have lost something in translation. Please explain (laughs)

Offroad wrote: "For every smelly foot there is an old boot."

Does it mean that for every consequence there is a preceding action/relationship?

Talbuixe wrote: My funny uncle used to say this… Every time the bills are smaller and the amounts bigger.
(Of course, this is a free translation of “Cada vez los recibos son más pequeños y las cantidades más grandes

It remains true in any language not just Spanish Talbuixe.

and finally
Kitten. Perfect response. Most decidely excellent explanation! Oh and BTW that is a great new Avatar Kitten..



pedro
Posted: Wednesday, March 9, 2011 8:05:39 AM
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'See No Jerkheads Eat No Monkeys' - roughly 'Hear everything, see everything, but say nothing')
Alias
Posted: Wednesday, March 9, 2011 8:17:06 AM
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Hmm Pedro I am not quite with the gist there my man....Where exactly do the "Jerkheads" come in? .....Besides dude I only eat Tofu Monkeys....d'oh!
Lucie
Posted: Wednesday, March 9, 2011 8:25:31 AM
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The most annoying things my mother used to say:

"Six-A-One!" - which I eventually found out was her abbreviation of "Six of one, half a dozen of the other," which apparently means -"either or" or "same difference" or "makes no difference" This one was mostly annoying because of the singsong manner in which she would say "six-a-one!" (the "a" is pronounced like "uh")

Also, when asked the any question involving "Why?" she would invariably answer "Z"

So infuriating.
Vickster
Posted: Wednesday, March 9, 2011 8:27:54 AM
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My mother used to say....and I continue to say it (I'm sure youve heard me)

"That woman walks around like her shit don't stink..." (meaning: she think she's too good for someone..special and priviledged)
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Wednesday, March 9, 2011 8:29:33 AM

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Alias wrote:
In reverse order. JJ wrote: "Barking dogs don't clack"

JJ I dont get it! It must have lost something in translation. Please explain (laughs)


Some influential person I hardly know use this kind of self-made proverbs in local pub after the 4th beer when discussion tend to turn into witty play on words. It's fun to look at the brows for a second or two after something like this is thrown.
Alias
Posted: Wednesday, March 9, 2011 9:08:48 AM
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JJ you clearly spend a considerable portion of your time imbibing ..either between Saunas or down the Rubbadydub (OZ rhyming slang for Pub)
Judging by the level of sophistication of the outcome of these social interactions (combined with ingestion of the amber fluid) seems to result in rather obtuse aphorisms...Angel

Vickster: I know her well! She is a snob, a toff, one who looks down upon us mere mortals.... as for your mam..she sounds like folk that come from my place of progenation...Manchester UK...."Eeeh she thinks her shit dont stink" spoken with a thick Mancunian accent (like Coronation Street!).

Also Lucie:
My Mum (and Dad) would also say "Its six uh one and arf duzzen tuther!" (Mancunian accent ..see above) and my Dad would also say Zed when we asked why?

His other saying was in response to us boys saying "I'm Hungry" to which he would reply "Oh I thought you were English" ....We came to know them as "Dad Jokes" meaning they were standard, "lame" and infinitely repeatable (and predictable) responses to life's situations....we kids would just groan....Angel
Shironeko
Posted: Wednesday, March 9, 2011 9:38:42 AM
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I always thought this saying -the road to hell is paved with good intentions- was related to the means-goal dilemma. As in one should not only focus on pursuing a righteous final objective (goal), but also making sure he follows the right path (means) towards said objective o.oa

*wants a white star* >:3

edit: oops forgot to add another saying... "Parents are the bones on which offspring sharpen their teeth and nails". I've experienced this from both sides I'm convinced it's true :3
Vickster
Posted: Wednesday, March 9, 2011 9:44:29 AM
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how about...

He's going to hell in a handbasket.... (another one of Mom's sayings...Brick wall )
jcbarros
Posted: Wednesday, March 9, 2011 10:10:07 AM

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My old man used to say: My kingdom for a horse (or a beer, or a hammer or...whatever he needed) No,he was´nt the famous Richard at Bosworth Field)
MTC
Posted: Wednesday, March 9, 2011 10:49:26 AM
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This ironic proverb points out that our "good intentions" may well produce unexpectedly evil results. That is why the road to Hell is paved with them. Another saying which expresses a similar sentiment is : "The best laid schemes o' mice an' men / Gang aft agley." (The best laid schemes of mice and men / Go oft awry.) From "To a Mouse" by Scottish poet Robert Burns.
Heraklit
Posted: Wednesday, March 9, 2011 11:16:33 AM
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The road to hell...

My understanding is that good intentions do not necessarily excuse bad consequences; purity of intentions is not laudable in and of itself. And going perhaps beyong the idiom, good intentions are sometimes, in combination with naiveté, reproachable.

Heraklit
Posted: Wednesday, March 9, 2011 11:19:09 AM
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My mother: "Life's a bitch and then you die."
HWNN1961
Posted: Wednesday, March 9, 2011 11:55:48 AM
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My Dad:

"He could fall into a pile of s@@t and come out smelling like a rose":


Meaning some people can screw up royally and still come out looking good.


My brother:

"People in hell want icewater":

Said in response to a request: meaning "fat chance" (what do you think the chances are that the damned get a cool drink with an umbrella in it).

My own favorite:

"Cemetaries are full of irreplaceable people":

You aren't the center of the universe, don't get too smug, you can be replaced.
mindmaze
Posted: Wednesday, March 9, 2011 12:39:42 PM
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"Donkeys lips do not fit into a horse's mouth." (?)
richsap
Posted: Wednesday, March 9, 2011 12:41:44 PM
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My Mother: "The squeaky wheel always gets the grease"

In reference to the person who speaks up for him or her self will obtain satisfaction.

My addendum to that: "The squeaky wheel is the first one to be replaced"
martyg
Posted: Wednesday, March 9, 2011 12:57:07 PM
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<My mother: "Life's a bitch and then you die."> close but another alternative is;

the first ten years of married life is like living in hell, after that you're better off dead.

just a saying. personally i don't really believe it.
larry marvin
Posted: Wednesday, March 9, 2011 3:06:58 PM
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As a pre-teen my best friends Dad would say;
"Speak to me again Oh sweet lips and I will find you in the dark"
He would say this upon hearing a certain sound emanating from anyone nearby, pardon the reference. Pffft
Casper
Posted: Wednesday, March 9, 2011 3:41:07 PM

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My grandmother likes to say this to me whenever she sees my stepmother and her own children..." you are better than them, so don't make any mistakes, or else they will look like "cats who eat the canary"
blue2
Posted: Wednesday, March 9, 2011 4:16:38 PM

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My dad would say: If you want something done right, do it yourself.

Don't whine and complain about the way things are done or not done. Appreciate what is done, especially if it is for you, or give a helping hand or do it yourself.

I happen to like the saying very much.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Wednesday, March 9, 2011 4:17:05 PM

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"Cold as in Ruskies' hell" was a saying here during the cold war era. It was widely thought that despite of some achievements in other disciplines the Soviets couldn't afford a good central heating.
kitten
Posted: Wednesday, March 9, 2011 4:17:42 PM
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mindmaze wrote:
"Donkeys lips do not fit into a horse's mouth." (?)



I looked this up and it says it is a Chinese proverb. Don't know from where yet.

"Donkey's lips do not fit onto a horse's mouth."
- Chinese Proverbs >>>> www.great-quotes.com

There is someone of facebook with the above quote ^^^^^^ and you can use it so sign it. Think Or whatever you do as I don't do facebook. Shhh

Found a lovely site with horse proverbs. Anxious

As soon as I read, "Donkey's lips do not fit into a horse's mouth" I thought of the book "Gone With the Wind" where Mammy told Scarlett what she thought of
her marrying that scallawag Rhett Butler.

"You ain' nuthin but a mule in a hawse harness. You kin polish a mule's feet an' shine his hide an' put
brass all over his harness and' hitch him ter a fine cah'ige. But he a mule jet' de same. He doan fool nobody."


I know, Mammy, is talking about mules not donkeys but it was the meaning that I thought was the same.

Every link I have looked at just say it is a, Chinese proverb, but gives no further explanation.

peace out, >^,,^<
excaelis
Posted: Wednesday, March 9, 2011 5:03:00 PM

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My Dad has a whole raft of wisdom:

It can't fall down, there's nothing holding it up.

Rich ? He's got more money than the Pope.

If you don't want it and you can't move it, paint it white and call it a " feature ".

A Roland for an Oliver ! ( fair exchange, having to do with the Battle at Roncesvalles, I believe.)

If you don't like it don't look at it !

Do something, even if it's wrong.

Put your hand in your pocket before you put it on a glass.
MTC
Posted: Wednesday, March 9, 2011 5:09:16 PM
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Re: "Donkey's lips do not fit onto a horse's mouth."

I believe this proverb simply refers to something out of place; something unrelated or inappropriate to the context or situation.
excaelis
Posted: Wednesday, March 9, 2011 5:20:21 PM

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You can't make a silk purse out of a horse's mouth.



As an aside, a great line from Clive James: I was the proverbial gift horse that ran off at the mouth.
HWNN1961
Posted: Wednesday, March 9, 2011 6:38:29 PM
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A couple more:

Dear old Dad again:

"The world doesn't owe you a living".

It means don't wait for a hand out, go get what you want.


Mom's favorite around bill-paying time:

"Stealing from Peter to pay Paul."

What a family on a tight budget sometimes has to do.
Yaelyael
Posted: Wednesday, March 9, 2011 7:17:05 PM
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My contribution:

"Beggars can't be choosy."
kitten
Posted: Wednesday, March 9, 2011 7:59:52 PM
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Firstly, thank you HWNN---I found some lovely quilting sites by looking this pattern up.

I have used the expression 'robbing Peter to pay Paul' and I wondered from where it came as I also know it is a quilting pattern.

I found this:

"Speculation has been rife for centuries over the origin of this common saying; every avenue has apparently been explored, but the original allusion is still a mystery. In English it dates back at least to the fourteenth century; the French have a similar saying at least as old, and there is, in Latin, a twelfth-century phrase, "Tanquam si quis Crucifigeret Paulum ut redimeret Petrum, (As it were that one would crucify Paul in order to redeem Peter)." The verbs have varied from time to time, depending upon the desired application. Thus we find that one has borrowed from or unclothed Peter to pay or to clothe Paul, but "rob" is th e oldest English usage, so recorded in Wyclif's Select English Works, written about 1380. The thought has always been to take something (usually money) that is needed for one purpose and use it for another." <<<< from JOHN FENZEL website. The source is below.

Source: A Hog on Ice & Other Curious Expressions,The Origin and Development of the Pungent & Colorful Phrases We All Use, by Charles Earle Funk, Litt.D. (1948)

Also

Many folks believe that this metaphor has its origin in 16th-century England, when part of the estate of Saint Peter's Cathedral in Westminster was appropriated to pay for repairs to Saint Paul's in London. <<< urban dictionary.

>^,,^<

Tovarish
Posted: Wednesday, March 9, 2011 9:48:27 PM
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My Dads comments regarding pretentious women, "She wouldn't say 'Shit' for a Shilling", used to be sixpence but

we all know how thing rise in price.

Meaning you couldn't pay her to swear.

I thought "The road to Hell is paved with good intentions" meant, people started to do something nice and never 'got a round-tuit'

Scarce item those 'round-tuits'
mindmaze
Posted: Wednesday, March 9, 2011 10:02:31 PM
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I never really understood "Heavens to Betsy!" exclamation (?)

Also strange is "With baited breath." As children when we heard this we thought how yucky because we thought baited had something to do with worms Whistle Now I think it referred to anticipation, but how that is inferred is a stretch.
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