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Daemon
Posted: Tuesday, May 17, 2016 12:00:00 AM
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Lake Baikal

At 12,160 sq mi (31,494 sq km), Lake Baikal is the largest freshwater lake in Eurasia. It is also the world's deepest lake, with a maximum depth of 5,714 ft (1,742 m). Located in southern Siberia, the clear, oxygen-rich waters are home to a wide range of aquatic plants and creatures, including such unusual species as the world's only freshwater seal, and can sustain animal life more than 5,200 ft (1,600 m) below the surface. What percent of the world's surface freshwater is held in Lake Baikal? More...
ChristopherJohnson
Posted: Tuesday, May 17, 2016 4:05:14 AM

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It is really amazing that an inland fresh-water lake should be about 5 kilometres deep!
thar
Posted: Tuesday, May 17, 2016 5:45:11 AM

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It is a rift. A split in the Earth.....Drool Anxious

The plate splits and pulls apart, and the bit in the middle falls down the hole (to put it simply!) The depression fills with water - until it stops being filled as fast as water is taken out, and the water level keeps on falling......


It is still opening at a couple of cm a year. If it continued to rift and the plate split completely (the two sides can already be defined as the Eurasian and Amurian plates), you get lava oozing through and something like the Atlantic Ocean.

But it's not clear what will happen - the primary driving force in the area is the collision of Indian with Asia, but there is also pull-down from the subducting Pacific - but rifts form where there is mantle upwelling, so it will also depend on how that evolves.





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KenO
Posted: Tuesday, May 17, 2016 6:28:58 AM

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Lake Baikal is the most voluminous freshwater lake in the world, containing roughly 20% of the world's unfrozen surface fresh water.
monamagda
Posted: Tuesday, May 17, 2016 5:53:23 PM

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Lake Baikal:



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Lake Baikal, the world’s oldest and deepest freshwater lakein the world,which contains roughly 20% of the world's unfrozen surface freshwater , curves for nearly 400 miles through south-eastern Siberia, north of the Mongolian border.

It lies in a cleft where Asia is literally splitting apart, the beginnings of a future ocean.

Geologists say Baikal today shows what the seaboards of North America, Africa and Europe looked like as they began to separate millions of years ago.

More than 5,000 feet deep (1637m) at its most profound, with another four-mile-thick layer of sediment further down, the lake’s cold, oxygen-rich waters teem with bizarre life-forms.

One of those is the seals’ favourite food, the golomyanka, a pink, partly transparent fish which gives birth to live young. Geologists estimate that Lake Baikal formed somewhere 20-25 million years ago, during the Mesozoic.

Surrounded by mile-high snowcapped mountains, Lake Baikal still offers vistas of unmatched beauty. The mountains are still a haven for wild animals, and the small villages are still outposts of tranquillity and self-reliance in the remote Siberian taiga, as the forest is called.

http://lakebaikal.org/
Rahul Goyal
Posted: Tuesday, May 17, 2016 8:12:36 PM

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Location: Kolkata, Bengal, India
Awesome
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