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gig7
Posted: Sunday, March 20, 2016 11:49:03 AM

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Hi!

I don’t know if it’s the right place to ask such a question but I’ll have a try.
I was watching an episode of a TV series “Allo allo” and I just can’t hear (and understand) what does Michell say to the British airmen. It’s 6:27 of this:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rla1gBwA_fA&list=PLzovi87vDfzKh8NS04TU0eLYKJzIw3TpS&index=11

Could anyone help me?
thar
Posted: Sunday, March 20, 2016 12:10:29 PM

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You do get the joke here, with the accents?

The French and the English agent are speaking French - so they have French accents.

The English agent then speaks to the English - with a posh English accent.
The airmen speak very posh English.

And when the English airmen try to speak French, they are very bad at it , and speak with ann English accent and get all the vowels wrong!

To the French:
This means the plane is coming tonight to pick up the British airmen.

To the British airmen:
I say, chaps, there's a plane coming for you tonight.
>>Ho, wacko!
[Come on] get a move on, it's "Toodle pip!" and back to Dear Old Blighty.
>>Good show!

This is all very English slang, and very silly upper crust phrases - because she is talking to the English.

'Toodle pip' like 'Toodle doo' means goodbye.
'Blighty' is England. (Or Britain, but I think it is just an English phrase, more than a British one).
gig7
Posted: Sunday, March 20, 2016 12:25:12 PM

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I do get the joke, the accents are hilarious. I simply didn’t get that phrase because of those culture-specific items. Thanks!

It is even more interesting to see how a translation (voice-over) deals with this multitude of accents. It was a difficult job for a translator :)
thar
Posted: Sunday, March 20, 2016 12:30:35 PM

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Yes, the whole joke is that everything is in English, but you have all the different players
The French, the Germans and the English all speak French, or try to, while the Germans speak German and the English speak English.
The accent are a joke on it all being in English.

And those upper-crust phrases are a class joke.

Apparently it was popular in France and Germany, both dubbed. I don't know what they did in France - but I assume in Germany, the Germans had to lose at least a bit of their comedic German accents!
And how they translated 'Dear Old Blighty'? Think
gig7
Posted: Sunday, March 20, 2016 1:26:32 PM

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thar wrote:

And how they translated 'Dear Old Blighty'? Think


They simply skipped it! I was quite disappointed because earlier they were very innovative in translating tricky word play and idioms...

May I ask you once again to write down what Michell says after ‘I am desperate’ (16:30):
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hws_bc0wWeQ&index=10&list=PLzovi87vDfzKh8NS04TU0eLYKJzIw3TpS

I’m not proficient in English and I miss some phrases (and jokes as well):(
thar
Posted: Sunday, March 20, 2016 2:27:51 PM

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Is that thing loaded?
>>I am desperate. I have one up the spout.
That would make you desperate.

Like 90% of the jokes, this is a sexual double entendre.

'One up the spout' here means the gun is cocked and there is a bullet in the chamber, ready to fire.

But 'up the spout' is also slang for being pregnant. Hence his reply.

gig7
Posted: Monday, March 21, 2016 11:29:05 AM

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Thank you so much!!
I compared it with the Polish version but the translation was not as funny as the laughter in the background would indicate. This is why I was curious what was there in the original.

Would you mind helping be from time to time? I promise it won’t be too often! :)
gig7
Posted: Friday, April 1, 2016 10:37:12 AM

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Hi!

Here are two more quotes that I wish to decipher. Although I replay this part again and again I can’t understand these phrases :(

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wWACyf_9Ms0&index=13&list=PLzovi87vDfzKh8NS04TU0eLYKJzIw3TpS
^^ 14:01 What does Crabtree say instead of forty? I suppose it must be some dirty word as in many other jokes...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SrkPuZj9RIM&index=12&list=PLzovi87vDfzKh8NS04TU0eLYKJzIw3TpS
^^ 11:03 ... by a knockwurst. What is the first word in that sentence?

Thanks so much for help!
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Friday, April 1, 2016 2:28:24 PM

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gig7 wrote:
Hi!

Here are two more quotes that I wish to decipher. Although I replay this part again and again I can’t understand these phrases :(

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wWACyf_9Ms0&index=13&list=PLzovi87vDfzKh8NS04TU0eLYKJzIw3TpS
^^ 14:01 What does Crabtree say instead of forty? I suppose it must be some dirty word as in many other jokes...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SrkPuZj9RIM&index=12&list=PLzovi87vDfzKh8NS04TU0eLYKJzIw3TpS
^^ 11:03 ... by a knockwurst. What is the first word in that sentence?

Thanks so much for help!

In the first one Crabtree says 'farty' a British slang term for producing flatus, breaking wind.
In the second one it us 'Knackered by a knockwurst', knackered means to be tired, broken or spoilt in this case it means the later.

Just a quick aside another reason Allo, Allo was funny to British viewers is that it was a spoof of an earlier British drama called 'The Secret Army'.
thar
Posted: Friday, April 1, 2016 4:18:58 PM

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Wow, I admire your ability to understand any of this - the sound quality is bad enough without the sound of jets taking off every few seconds!

Just to add, the joke is that K is pronounced in German, but silent in English words like knackered - , unless a German says it, of course.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Saturday, April 2, 2016 3:48:16 AM

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thar wrote:
Wow, I admire your ability to understand any of this - the sound quality is bad enough without the sound of jets taking off every few seconds!

Just to add, the joke is that K is pronounced in German, but silent in English words like knackered - , unless a German says it, of course.


It's not that busy an airport.Drool

For anyone wondering about that exchange the town I live is home to one of Londons regional airports.
gig7
Posted: Saturday, April 2, 2016 7:24:36 AM

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Thank you!

thar wrote:
Wow, I admire your ability to understand any of this - the sound quality is bad enough without the sound of jets taking off every few seconds!


That's true. The quality doesn't help, especially when you're not a native speaker :(
Do you mean the sound of jets that is IN the videos? Because I can hear them too and I’m wandering where they come from Think
thar
Posted: Saturday, April 2, 2016 12:16:41 PM

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From some very dodgy recording! The pic-in pic is to bypass the bots which identify the image and have the upload removed for copyright reasons - but the strange sounds on the audio? - I have no idea. As far as I know there is no bot that can identify a TV programme upload from its audio, so you don't need to disguise it. And it is not like there is a needle to scrape!
gig7
Posted: Monday, April 4, 2016 12:49:23 PM

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tSNadgjwwCA&list=PLzovi87vDfzKh8NS04TU0eLYKJzIw3TpS&index=9

Do I hear right that Helga in 37:00 says „He had a fish” after Herr Flick got a fit? It was thus translated into Polish but I’m afraid it’s some mistranslation if she really says so… Is it some kind of an idiom or a colloquial phrase?
Could you please help me once again?
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Monday, April 4, 2016 5:21:20 PM

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Helga says "He had the fish" which is a joke about the cooking of the cafè.

It is not a colloquialism or idiomatic phrase.
gig7
Posted: Saturday, April 9, 2016 12:27:55 PM

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Hi!
Here is another one.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dZA6djD-gJA&index=18&list=PLzovi87vDfzKh8NS04TU0eLYKJzIw3TpS
What does Rene say in 15:07?

I'd be very grateful if you could help me!
I hope I'm not a nuisance to you Pray
thar
Posted: Sunday, April 10, 2016 2:39:33 AM

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Ah, an idiom - "in trouble". For once, no innuendo. Not really a joke.

"So, we are up the creek without a paddle"

http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/Up+the+Creek

Not a nuisance - we have free will!
gig7
Posted: Sunday, April 10, 2016 12:26:05 PM

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thar wrote:
Ah, an idiom - "in trouble".


Oh, thanks again!
I’ll get to know a lot of idioms by watching this series :)
gig7
Posted: Sunday, April 17, 2016 3:35:36 PM

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I’m replaying it over and over again but I can’t hear what the general says (in 20:43) before he orders Gruber to leave :(

http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xsjine_allo-allo-sez-3-odc-5_shortfilms
thar
Posted: Monday, April 18, 2016 4:02:36 AM

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Yowzer - I am not surprised.

What is it with this trick of dubbing and leaving the original? I have seen it before, only that was on Russian dubbing. Why? Either dub it and have it in one language, or subtitle it and have both. Dubbing and leaving the original seems to be the worst of both worlds.

My best guess is something like this

I will be the laughing stock of the whole army

I wouldn't laugh at you, Colonel. You have always been kind to me, in your bluff old __ way.

Sorry, I can't hear that bit, and now it has redirected. But maybe if your ear is in, that will help.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Monday, April 18, 2016 9:11:26 AM

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It is easier to hear on this clip, although it has the same sound quality problems as on previous clips from this source.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=IMkVPYSnTy0
The dialogue is this

'I wouldn't laugh at you, Colonel.You have always been kind to me, in your bluff overbearing way.'
gig7
Posted: Wednesday, April 20, 2016 2:10:26 PM

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Oh on, oh no I’ve mixed it all up and gave you both the wrong link and wrong time, I’m SO sorry, I can’t believe I’ve done something that stupid!

I watch both Polish and English version at the same time so that I can compare the translation with the original and I copied the wrong link :(

I meant 23:40 in this. I can’t hear what the general says after Helga finishes her announcement:
http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x434czn

thar wrote:


What is it with this trick of dubbing and leaving the original? I have seen it before, only that was on Russian dubbing. Why? Either dub it and have it in one language, or subtitle it and have both. Dubbing and leaving the original seems to be the worst of both worlds.



I must say that it is standard in Polish to have such an “voice-over” instead of dubbing. I admit that I prefer it to the usual dubbing, as you can hear the real voices of actors. Only films for children are dubbed. Of course, subtitles are the best option but there are absolutely no subtitles in Polish TV. In cinemas it is more frequent and with more popular films you can choose whether you want to buy a ticket for a version with dubbing or with subtitles.
gig7
Posted: Thursday, April 21, 2016 4:08:31 PM

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Here’s another one if you have any spare time to check it:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IUXawuk0DyQ&index=25&list=PLzovi87vDfzKh8NS04TU0eLYKJzIw3TpS

What does the colonel reply after the Italian officer says sth like “how was he think I win all those medals” in 18:40?
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Friday, April 22, 2016 3:31:48 AM

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gig7 wrote:
Here’s another one if you have any spare time to check it:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IUXawuk0DyQ&index=25&list=PLzovi87vDfzKh8NS04TU0eLYKJzIw3TpS

What does the colonel reply after the Italian officer says sth like “how was he think I win all those medals” in 18:40?


The colonel says "you shaddupa your cake hole "

Cake hole is a British slang term for the mouth, and shaddupa is a slightly racist impression of an Italian man trying to say shut up in English.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Friday, April 22, 2016 3:37:16 AM

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gig7 wrote:
Oh on, oh no I’ve mixed it all up and gave you both the wrong link and wrong time, I’m SO sorry, I can’t believe I’ve done something that stupid!

I watch both Polish and English version at the same time so that I can compare the translation with the original and I copied the wrong link :(

I meant 23:40 in this. I can’t hear what the general says after Helga finishes her announcement:
http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x434czn

thar wrote:


What is it with this trick of dubbing and leaving the original? I have seen it before, only that was on Russian dubbing. Why? Either dub it and have it in one language, or subtitle it and have both. Dubbing and leaving the original seems to be the worst of both worlds.



I am not sure but I think he says "send in the elves" indicating he considers Herr Flick and his companions in the Gestapo less important than real military officers.
That is what I think anyway someone else might have a different idea.

I must say that it is standard in Polish to have such an “voice-over” instead of dubbing. I admit that I prefer it to the usual dubbing, as you can hear the real voices of actors. Only films for children are dubbed. Of course, subtitles are the best option but there are absolutely no subtitles in Polish TV. In cinemas it is more frequent and with more popular films you can choose whether you want to buy a ticket for a version with dubbing or with subtitles.
gig7
Posted: Sunday, April 24, 2016 3:20:13 PM

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Sarrriesfan wrote:


The colonel says "you shaddupa your cake hole "

Cake hole is a British slang term for the mouth, and shaddupa is a slightly racist impression of an Italian man trying to say shut up in English.


Thanks! In the Polish translation the slang term was omitted altogether which is again quite a big loss...
gig7
Posted: Thursday, May 5, 2016 3:23:49 PM

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What does the colonel say in 1:58 after the general says “Did I hear hiding under the table?”?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YA3PM5o-er0

I’m sorry to bother you again, I hope you don’t mind.
Thanks!
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, May 5, 2016 5:13:17 PM

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Not the best sound quality, is it?

I think it's
"Did I hear, 'Hiding under the table'?"
"No, I said 'Fighting in the stables.'"


I think . . . possibly, perhaps.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Friday, May 6, 2016 1:21:58 AM

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Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Not the best sound quality, is it?

I think it's
"Did I hear, 'Hiding under the table'?"
"No, I said 'Fighting in the stables.'"


I think . . . possibly, perhaps.


The sound quality is poor I agree.

I heard
'Fighting until I'm disabled"

But it is not clear.
PureBlueLight
Posted: Wednesday, May 11, 2016 10:33:15 AM

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I watched all the seasons of "Allo Allo", many years ago, and i don't recommend it, because, as almost everything else on television or internet, it plays with and promotes serious issues, that induce the audience to enjoy something that is immoral. That's how they get you, subtly.
thar
Posted: Wednesday, May 11, 2016 10:50:43 AM

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I am not a great fan of it as a show, but I think your point that you have to be serious about everything is wrong. People didn't need to be told about the horrors of war - the people watching it had lived though it and its aftermath, or their parents and grandparents had. The writer had served in the army at the end of the war.

It also has a cultural context beyond just the war - it was a response to the cultural heritage of the war - it is a spoof on one such serious drama about the resistance, as well as the great glut of war films in the years after the war.

Secret Army
A serious, well respected and understandably harrowing drama.
Quote:
Series One[edit]
Lisa Colbert (Jan Francis) runs 'Lifeline', a Brussels-based resistance organisation that helps Allied aircrew to evade capture and return to Britain via neutral countries such as Switzerland or Spain. She is helped by Albert Foiret (Bernard Hepton), proprietor of the Cafe Candide, his mistress Monique Duchamps (Angela Richards) and waitress Natalie Chantrens (Juliet Hammond-Hill).

Their already dangerous operations are put under further strain when Sturmbannführer Ludwig Kessler (Clifford Rose) is assigned to the Belgian capital to assist Major Brandt (Michael Culver) close down the evasion line.


So, no similarity in the plot there!

Drama is important. But laughter is healthy. And ridicule is essential!
gig7
Posted: Thursday, May 12, 2016 3:21:04 PM

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Of course, it is not a sophisticated kind of entertainment but we cannot be serious all the time!

What struck me was that the series plays so much with different stereotypes (mostly those concerning nations) and shows how much we are influenced by them. In places it might me exaggerated but I guess it somehow teaches through ridiculing.
Besides, what made me watch the series is the linguistic side of it. I think I have never come across such a variety of wordplay. Watching the translator struggle with all the nuances of English is quite absorbing :)

By the way, why did you keep watching all the seasons if you find the series immoral?
thar
Posted: Thursday, May 12, 2016 7:24:18 PM

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Hmmm, the 'wordplay' in 'Allo 'Allo mostly involves making puns about sausages, knobs, 'pissing' (mispronounced 'passing') and the high-end satire of 'the Fallen Madonna with the big boobies'. Subtle it ain't!
But it merits the odd chuckle. And that is always worth it!


Romany
Posted: Saturday, May 14, 2016 1:09:25 PM
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The English employ satire on an everyday basis. The series is satirical. The fact that it is bad satire is ALSO part of the satire.

It started out as a satire on a particular series but, as it went on, began to employ every racial stereotype, generalisation, passed-on piece of ignorance, and common misconception which still abounded after WW2. Its purpose was to ridicule them all.

It has long been understood that when you reduce ridiculous prejudice, ideas, fears and threats to ridicule you take away any credibility such things may hold in the public mind.

To label the show "racist" is to completely misunderstand both it AND the message it was sending. The show REDUCES racism to the point of risibility and, when we're laughing at something, it's impossible to accept it by giving it the dignity of being taken seriously.
gig7
Posted: Saturday, May 14, 2016 1:33:00 PM

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thar wrote:
Hmmm, the 'wordplay' in 'Allo 'Allo mostly involves making puns about sausages, knobs, 'pissing' (mispronounced 'passing') and the high-end satire of 'the Fallen Madonna with the big boobies'. Subtle it ain't!



There are numerous instances of creative use of polysemy, homonymy or homophones. Quite frequently about pissing and stuff like that but I admire the form rather than the contents :)
As those are language-specific features, the translation is quite a challenge.
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