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Marginal Notes Options
Epiphileon
Posted: Monday, February 21, 2011 9:32:53 AM

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I had no idea there was actually a word for the practice of making notes in the margins of books, but there is, marginalia. I wonder if that would have made me a marginaliac in school?
Article in NYT today; "Book Lovers Fear Dim Future for Notes in the Margins"
I had actually pondered this problem when e-books were first hitting the market. I wonder if manufacturers could be enticed to make it a feature of newer models? I think it would be an amazing boon to research, particularly if you could cross reference across multiple books. Can you even highlight portions of text in these modern, marginal wonders?
Nabi
Posted: Monday, February 21, 2011 10:33:45 AM
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It's a good topic,
I like hard copy books more than electronic ones, not because of note taking, but because of eye strain I get when reading ebooks. However, when reading pdf books, you can still add notes and highlight important parts. I do it a lot and it works out for me.
uuaschbaer
Posted: Monday, February 21, 2011 11:11:07 AM

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What a very nice article. It has convinced me to marginalize more :). It's quite silly when people say you have to respect books. Unless they are valuable early nineteenth century books they should be read and enjoyed, not respected. It would be interesting if you could download an e-book with other people's marginalia, or if you could overlay your friends'.
Another reason why I advocate people not respecting books but wearing them out is that they will be so much cheaper for me when I buy them in a secondhand bookshop.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Monday, February 21, 2011 11:21:27 AM

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Many of my books, especially poetry, are full of marginalia. It's part of the fun to read now what 18-year-old JJ has been written along the pages of T.S. Eliot's Waste Land back in the 70's. Dancing
dtpostel
Posted: Monday, February 21, 2011 12:28:55 PM
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I've been into repairing hardback books for a few years and intend to expand into recasing them. I wondering how this ebook business will impact my desire to grow a book repair business. What might TFD'er think?
uuaschbaer
Posted: Monday, February 21, 2011 2:24:57 PM

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dtpostel wrote:
I've been into repairing hardback books for a few years and intend to expand into recasing them. I wondering how this ebook business will impact my desire to grow a book repair business. What might TFD'er think?


What kind of customers do you have? People who are looking to increase or keep the value of antique books? Or people who like their books whole for practical reasons? It matters because the kind of books that people wouldn't bother to have repaired for practical reasons, paperbacks mostly, are the kind of books that people are most likely to buy in electronic form. (I'd guess.)
kitten
Posted: Monday, February 21, 2011 2:52:07 PM
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Interesting topic. I don't ever write in the margins or mark any kind of notes in books.Shame on you I am one of those that has books that always look brand new.

If a favourite book of mine becomes crinkled in anyway I buy another one. For craft books I transfer the pattern with notes to seperate notebook.Anxious

I have used post-its to mark things but I don't even like to do that for fear the post-it will stain.

I do collect antique cookbooks and craft books and enjoy seeing the addition of notes in the margin but I won't do it myself.

>^,,^<
ludic
Posted: Monday, February 21, 2011 3:35:24 PM

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I can never keep myself from noting my observations or interpretations of the text in the margins, along with any relevant drawings. I also used many colored pencils (not highlighters) to highlight lines in the text.

Besides these, you can also find multiple samples of my signature and name and doodled patterns in the marginalia.

I best like my books battered, and rebound. I never feel like touching a book all pristine and with crisp pages.

Nothing gives me more happiness than seeing my book worn-out with pages yellowed. I like to go through old books and see my scribblings, and re-feeling what was in my mind at that time; or if it's my course books, the scribblings help in understannding a subtle point that might have slipped from my mind.

Even when I'm reading pdfs, I take short notes and draw on the margins.


viva marginalia!
Cat
Posted: Monday, February 21, 2011 3:36:43 PM

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When my sister died at age 23, my mother kept the books that my sister had written in in order to keep my sister's thoughts.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Monday, February 21, 2011 6:14:50 PM

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I had to look up...

The Dhammapada (Penguin Classics paperback),
Chapter 15, Joy:

197 "O let us live in joy, in love amongst those who hate! Among men who hate, let us live in love."


In the margin, with pencil, -71 or 72, I guess: Woodstock, Reading, Ruisrock!


W.B. Yeats, Selected Poetry (bought -74)

The Great Day

HURRAH for revolution and more cannon-shot!
A beggar upon horseback lashes a beggar on foot.
Hurrah for revolution and cannon come again!
The beggars have changed places, but the lash goes on.

In the margin: they will fail - people are free or WILL be free!
excaelis
Posted: Monday, February 21, 2011 6:47:39 PM

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When I was in the groves of academe I often found the marginalia much more interesting ( and revealing ) than the texts themselves.
RuthP
Posted: Monday, February 21, 2011 7:28:21 PM

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Apparently, both the Kindle and the Nook have versions (I assume the newer ones) on which one may make marginal notations. Highlighting - yes on Nook, no on Kindle (no color?).

Here is an idea I hadn't seen before:

Entourage: eDGe (Yeah, a dumb way to spell it.)

This opens like a book. On one side is an e-ink screen; on the other side a color Android viewer. You can apparently turn-on only one side, if you wish and it uses some form of SD card for more memory. But, it is very expensive: $500 for the full-size (9" reader; 10" color screen); $350 for the smaller one (6" reader; 7" color).

You take notes with a stylus, writing on the screen. It has a journal in which you can write with the stylus. It also has a virtual keyboard.

It is interesting, and it is beginning to come close to what I would like to have, however, I feel the e-reader field is about where the personal computer field was in the 1980s: Nothing has settled-down and you cannot tell which formats will go belly-up leaving you without a reader for material you have purchased..
Epiphileon
Posted: Monday, February 21, 2011 8:05:37 PM

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Wow Ruth thanks for that, it is exactly what I was thinking might work.
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