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MIGRAINE Options
tashudee
Posted: Thursday, February 17, 2011 4:36:19 AM
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Location: INDIA
I have often heard people complaining of MIGRAINE! When questioned, they only know its effects with no knowledge about the cause and cure.

I would really love to know more from you guys!
Gunjika
Posted: Thursday, February 17, 2011 5:16:28 AM
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Location: India
Hello Tashudee, welcome to the forum.

Now you are going to listen from the horse's mouth...

I occassionally suffer from migraine, which I suppose is a tendency inherited from my mother. When it first strated troubling me, I observed my routine and found out that :

1) I usually have a migraine just before or after my time of the month> which is also a cause of acidity> which gives me severe migraine
2) Taking painkillers for headaches causes acidity>more headache.
3) Whenever I do not eat for hours, or have too much fried food, especially omelettes, I have acidity. Acidity causes headache which if not attended to converts into migraine.
4) Work related stress.
5) Working on antique office PC screens for long hours without wearing anti-glares.

Now, for the cure part, as I know the general causes, I also know how to control them:

1) Cannot avoid :) so I take a tablet of pantoprazole(for acidity) and an aspirin, only in severe cases. It has been recommended to me by doctor.
2) I never take a painkiller without an antacid tablet.
3) I eat regularly, eat only non-acidity-causing foods and try to keep sipping cold water at short intervals. Very relaxing.
4) I avoid stress by allowing myself little pleasures like intermittent games, talking to colleagues etc.
5) I am fighting with my boss to change my comp screen, meanwhile I continue to use anti glare glasses.

Recently I have also started "pranayama" which has nearly ended my gastric problems. I am hopeful of getting rid of the much dreaded headache soon.

These are entirely my own reasons and solutions for migraine. Different people have different causes and answers. My mother's migraine is largely attributed to her high BP.
tashudee
Posted: Thursday, February 17, 2011 5:22:04 AM
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Indeeed Gunjika.....thank you so much! I really appreciate that!

I myself experience this one sided headache when I am stressed and deprived of sleep! Will this also be considered as MIGRAINE?
Gunjika
Posted: Thursday, February 17, 2011 5:25:48 AM
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If it is prolonged and has a pattern, it indeed is! Try 'Pranayama'.
tashudee
Posted: Thursday, February 17, 2011 5:27:10 AM
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Location: INDIA
It definately has a pattern!

Is PRANAYAMA a sort of meditation?:)
Gunjika
Posted: Thursday, February 17, 2011 5:44:27 AM
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It is a precursor of meditation, actually it is a series of breathing exercises. If it sounds difficult to you, go buy a CD of Baba Ramdev's yoga. It is easy and you only need 15-20 minutes of your busy day!
tashudee
Posted: Thursday, February 17, 2011 5:51:23 AM
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Gunjika, thank you for your help!

I used to practise KRIYA a long time back! Would this too help me?
Gunjika
Posted: Thursday, February 17, 2011 5:54:08 AM
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Yess!
tashudee
Posted: Thursday, February 17, 2011 5:55:54 AM
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Location: INDIA
Thank You!

Will get to practising kriya again!

:)
Christine
Posted: Thursday, February 17, 2011 10:31:38 AM
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Joined: 4/3/2009
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chemicals

"Having migraines doesn't mean something is seriously wrong with your brain. Scientists now think that in people who get migraines, part of their brain is more excitable than normal. Because of this, the brain releases high levels of chemicals called





neurotransmitters
Neurotransmitters are chemicals that help to carry messages between nerve cells. Serotonin, dopamine and noradrenaline are all neurotransmitters.





neurotransmitters. These make the blood vessels in your brain dilate (get wider) and sometimes get





inflammation
If your skin or some other part of your body becomes red, swollen, hot or sore, we say it is inflamed. It means that your body is trying to protect you from germs, from something in your body tissues that can hurt you (like a thorn or sliver), or from things that cause allergies (allergens). Inflammation is part of the way the body heals an infection or injury.





inflamed. This is what causes the pain of migraines.

--I copy this but why it looks weird.. ?

here is the site: http://www.consumerreports.org/health/conditions-and-treatments/migraine-in-adults/what-is-it.htm


I suffered this migraine a lot of years. My was triggered by my hormones ..
Susie
Posted: Thursday, February 17, 2011 11:05:03 AM
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I just love this forum, if for nothing else, the kindness most share!! This one taught me something, as most of them do. Thanks! Applause
tashudee
Posted: Thursday, February 17, 2011 11:11:23 PM
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Christine, thank you for sharing.
mythoughts
Posted: Friday, February 18, 2011 12:47:17 AM
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Applause I could not believe when I read this forum on migraines..I am 40 years old and have suffered migraines since the age of 5. I have always thought that the acidity had something to do with my migraines along with my menstrual cycle. I always get one just before my cycle and I found that if I ate a lot of chocolate or ate pasta with sauce, I got a migraine!! This is the FIRST time I have heard someone else put the two together! Very exciting for me! Thank you for verifying my beliefs on migraine triggers!!
Gunjika
Posted: Friday, February 18, 2011 1:03:42 AM
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@mythoughts :

Yes, I forgot to mention that chocolates, coffee and cottage cheese are some of the forbidden stuff for my Mother, as told by her physician.
sarah71
Posted: Friday, February 18, 2011 2:43:54 AM

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Location: Turin, Piedmont, Italy
HELP!
I have a serious problem with neck arthritis which causes me strong migraine at least once a week. Any suggestion about a good therapy?
Thank you,
Have a nice day
Sarah
blue2
Posted: Friday, February 18, 2011 3:38:43 AM

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Not everyone has the same triggers for their migraines. What you have to do is figure out your own triggers. Chocolate and cheese did not appear to effect me at all. Not that I eat much of either. Having alcohol just before my cycle would definitely trigger a migraine in me as would a lot of stress. Watching TV in a dark room can give me a whopping headache. Sometimes, a simple headache would become a migraine. Note: I have fewer migraines now - I am menopausal so I don't have a cycle to make things worse. But I can hardly drink alcohol now; I feel a headache coming on while I'm drinking.

I have heard that migraine pain is not caused by your nerves, but swollen blood vessels pressing on your nerves. I don't know about the nausea, but the acidity mentioned by Gunjika sounds right. I have always thought that I suffered so much because I have low blood pressure. I have no idea if that is true.

If you are regularly experiencing migraines it is good if you keep a diary in order to pinpoint what is triggering them so you can try to avoid them. It could be two or three things in combination.

Sarah71 welcome! I suggest you see a doctor and perhaps do some physiotherapy. I had a pain in the back of my neck and physiotherapy cleared it up. I don't know about neck arthritis.
Gunjika
Posted: Friday, February 18, 2011 5:09:55 AM
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Yes Sarah,

I totally second blue2's opinion. Applause
sarah71
Posted: Friday, February 18, 2011 11:00:45 AM

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Thank you blue2 and Gunjika. I'm currently having an ostheopathy treatment, this is my first time with ostheopathy, and I don't know exactly what I can expect from this and, most of all, how much time it will take to have some relief... my neck arthtritis is so bad that once a week I have big headache and nausea, some call it week-end migraine.
thank you again
Anne0045
Posted: Wednesday, May 18, 2011 2:21:46 PM
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Joined: 5/17/2011
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I suffered debilitating migraines for several years following menopause. After trial and error I discovered that my trigger was chocolate. At first I was able to control them by taking 2 Extra Strength Excedin and 1 Sinutab. After awhile this home made concoction failed to work and I would get a migraine, pass out from the pain, sleep for a day, try to regain my strength for a day and wham...it would return, a vicious cycle. [Even though I no longer touched chocolate] At the time Imitrex was still being tested and I was selected for the trials. At the onset of a migraine I injected myself. The result was that it knocked me out for at least a day. The next day the migraine was gone, but I was so exhausted I couldn't hardly get out of bed. My neurologist finally suggested that I take a low dosage [25mg]of Amitriptyline to control the seratonin. Once I started the Amitriptyline I had another migraine, the worst I had ever encountered; the only way my doctor could help me was to admit me to the hospital and knock me out. Once discharged I continued with the Amitriptyline and I have not had a migraine since. I began taking the med in 1998 and am still taking it. While I believe that migraines have different causes and affects all who suffer from them differently, the more the subject is discussed and information shared, eventually scientists and doctors may be able to discover causes and cures. Oh, and no, I still don't touch chocolate, I'm not brave enough to find out if it would still trigger a migraine.
intelfam
Posted: Wednesday, May 18, 2011 3:12:13 PM
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sarah71 wrote:
Thank you blue2 and Gunjika. I'm currently having an ostheopathy treatment, this is my first time with ostheopathy, and I don't know exactly what I can expect from this and, most of all, how much time it will take to have some relief... my neck arthtritis is so bad that once a week I have big headache and nausea, some call it week-end migraine.
thank you again


Hi sarah71 and welcome. I guess this is off topic a bit, but I used, when I could afford it, to have osteopathy on my neck regularly. I used to get quite intense pain and a stiff neck. I was told that I had arthritis and that exercise and manipulation would help to remove the outgrowths that arthritis results in. I hope you have a system for regulating osteopaths where you are? I can tell you, it is an odd process and can result in more pain for a couple of days and it may take a few sessions. But it was the only thing that helped me. Hope it is successful for you!
srirr
Posted: Tuesday, May 31, 2011 2:50:10 AM

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With all the valuable comments and suggestions, I would like to add one more aspect that is related to liver.

Empty bowel, oily food, irregular habits, hormonal imbalance--all these may cause migraine, however migraine also has relation with liver problems. Get it diagnosed. My sister suffered from intermittent migraine for many years. All the medicines and exercises helped a bit, but could not cure completely. A Homeopathic practioner suggested to get the liver tested. He later prescribed some meds for it which ultimately cured her completely.
sisikou
Posted: Tuesday, May 31, 2011 7:43:50 PM
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Last year after doing the health check, the doctor suggested me to do a MRI for head scanning, to reduce the risk of head tumour after he found out the potential retina maculopathy of my right eye. (Thank God for no tumour after the check.) Angel
blue2
Posted: Thursday, June 2, 2011 11:24:11 AM

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Hi sisikou. So glad to hear you are clear of a tumour. It would be a scary thing to be thinking you might have one.
Ava
Posted: Saturday, June 4, 2011 1:59:08 PM

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I suffered through intermittent migraines for years, now they are rare. They started in my thirties and seemed to come on in clear, dry weather. I too, have been told that aged cheeses and chocolate can "trigger" them. This by a migraine research M.D. at UCLA who also told me that people who get migraines are also usually prone to motion sickness - which is absolutely true for me.

Mine come on fast and feel as if a big nail is being driven through the front of my skull. I cannot sit down, the pain is so intense, then I get hot and sweaty and then start throwing up after which the pain disappears briefly and I get so cold even piles of blankets don't warm me. I shake with chills until I start to warm up again, get so hot and start the throwing up again and have diarrhea. Then the pain stops briefly . . . over and over this cycle goes, five, six, seven times, until there is nothing left in me but the pain in my head. The good thing is that it's usually over in four hours, but twice I've had to go to the ER for IV fluids and potassium. After it's over, I usually have to sleep for at least a few hours.

None of the meds mentioned helped me; even a tablespoon of water with a med will trigger the throwing up again.

I now carry Maxalt-MLT 10mg (rizatriptan benzoate) with me always. When I detect that slight signal that a migraine is coming on, I put one in my mouth where it disintegrates slowly so I don't throw up. It the only thing that works and instead of above description, I have only a bare, "dullness" in my head and can function though I feel a little slowed down under it's influence.

One thing, if a migraine med doesn't help, it's not a migraine.

Hope this helps someone.
jeffreylee
Posted: Thursday, July 14, 2011 3:09:54 PM
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Location: India
tashudee wrote:
I have often heard people complaining of MIGRAINE! When questioned, they only know its effects with no knowledge about the cause and cure.

I would really love to know more from you guys!


Migraine is a chronic neurological disorder characterized by moderate to severe headaches, and nausea.It is about three times more common in women than in men.
aerie1
Posted: Tuesday, August 9, 2011 5:19:48 PM
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Joined: 8/9/2011
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Location: USA
"True" migraines are closely associated with blood flow in the brain in addition to an inflammatory reaction. It's thought to be an abnormal dilation of blood vessels that exert pressure on surrounding tissues & cause pain. Some people (me) are left with a "migraine bruise" or a sore spot for a day or 2 in the area after the actual headache is gone. Then there is the migraine with aura, ocular migraine & other types....Much of the etiology & pathology is unknown.

The normal hormonal fluctuations that regulate the menstrual cycle are the cause for many women. I could usually mark which days of the month to expect a migraine - at ovulation & menstruation - every 2 wks. They lasted for 3 days. It's hell. It can be truly debilitating. It affected my life horribly as far as well-being, productiveness & knowing that it can bring you to your knees for 3 straight days & you never really know when one might occur.

Thank the pharmagods for the "triptans" - Imitrex was one of the first in US & they've improved much since then. But, they are trial & error to find the 'right' one. Very expensive. They don't help some people, they wear off too soon & have nasty side effects.

So far, peri-menopause (I'm 45) has been good to me & greatly lessened their frequency but I keep Maxalt (my fave triptan) & ibuprofen always on hand (when I can afford it).

Thank you Ava! I forgot about those 'weather migraines'. Seriously, you can't even enjoy a nice day! Migraines suck.
aerie1
Posted: Tuesday, August 9, 2011 5:45:42 PM
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Location: USA
Ava wrote:
One thing, if a migraine med doesn't help, it's not a migraine.


So true. A bad headache does not equal migraine. The term migraine is misused & has lost it's meaning.

Also, you can't 'see' a migraine or imagine the severity like you can with say...a bloody wound or a broken arm or blue/green bruise or an Xray or bloodwork, etc., so there's zero understanding from bosses, coworkers, family, spouses & sometimes doctors. Or worse, you get accused of laziness, malingering, lying or drug-seeking...

Wow. Ava, I bow down to you girl - "I'm not worthy!" I feel bad for complaining when I read stories like yours. My triptan is Maxalt as well, but after trying several others...
HarveySmith
Posted: Tuesday, November 1, 2011 2:32:54 AM
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Joined: 11/1/2011
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Location: australia
A migraine is a common type of headache that may occur with symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, or sensitivity to light. Migraine attacks may be triggered by:
• Alcohol
• Allergic reactions
• Bright lights
• Certain odors or perfumes
• Changes in hormone levels (which can occur during a woman's menstrual cycle or with the use of birth control pills)
• Changes in sleep patterns
• Exercise
• Loud noises
• Missed meals
• Physical or emotional stress
• Smoking or exposure to smoke
When migraine symptoms begin:
• Drink water to avoid dehydration, especially if you have vomited
• Rest in a quiet, darkened room
• Place a cool cloth on your head
Other tips for preventing migraines include:
• Avoid smoking
• Avoid alcohol
• Avoid artificial sweeteners and other known food-related triggers
• Get regular exercise
• Get plenty of sleep each night
• Learn to relax and reduce stress -- some patients have found that biofeedback and self-hypnosis helps reduce the number of migraine attacks

HarveySmith
Posted: Wednesday, November 16, 2011 12:47:58 AM
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Location: australia
Migraine is three times more common in women than in men. Migraine is a very painful type of headache. Many things can trigger a migraine. These include Anxiety, Stress, and Lack of food or sleep, Exposure to light &Hormonal changes. Medicines can help prevent migraine attacks or help relieve symptoms of attacks when they happen.

leonAzul
Posted: Sunday, November 20, 2011 3:03:03 AM

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Here is a good starting point for a review of recent published research concerning migraines.
TOWARD A RATIONAL UNDERSTANDING OF MIGRAINE TRIGGER FACTORS

Note: Most of the links on this page are to abstracts or excerpts of articles available for sale or by subscription. Just the same, the titles, abstracts, and tables of contents are quite useful for further research.

This one is particularly intriguing:
How do trigger factors acquire the capacity to precipitate headaches?

I'll check in with more as time permits.
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