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is it wrong using of involve to read. Options
sri
Posted: Monday, January 31, 2011 8:06:41 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/19/2010
Posts: 65
Neurons: 195
Location: India
Hi friends,

Could you please tell whether the below sentence is right or not.

Most measurments involve to read some type of scale.

It sounds a bit odd to listen but I don't have any idea on the correct usage.

I am thinking Most measurments involve reading some type of scale can be the right one.could you please conform.

Thanks a lot in advance.
thar
Posted: Monday, January 31, 2011 8:20:58 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 22,450
Neurons: 90,987
your instinct is right

most measurements involve reading...

you involve something, so you need a noun here, or participle 'doing something', not an infinitive

even better to me(in impersonal, scientific terms), sounds
most measurements involve the reading of some type of scale.
dlux3
Posted: Monday, January 31, 2011 8:34:59 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 12/22/2010
Posts: 188
Neurons: 557
Location: Cairns, Far North Queensland, Australia
Yes. Read, read, read. Read your micrometer, read your verniers. We measure, we read it's (instruments) calibration. That is the engineers lot. Read the scale for that is our (engineers) living. The only certain thing is the discenrment of our figures. Numbers do not lie.




sri
Posted: Monday, January 31, 2011 8:43:14 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/19/2010
Posts: 65
Neurons: 195
Location: India
Thanks Thar .Thank you very much.

Thanks Dlux3 for your encouragement.
emmicue
Posted: Tuesday, February 1, 2011 7:16:33 PM
Rank: Member

Joined: 1/29/2011
Posts: 17
Neurons: 51
Location: Midwestern United States
Hi, Sri --

In many languages, the infinitive is the verb form most often used as a noun substitute, but in English the "-ing" form [called a gerund] is often used in place of the infinitive. Sometimes it's hard to know what to use!

"I like to read." and "I like reading." are both acceptable. But
"He wants to walk home." IS OK, yet "He wants walking home." is NOT OK.
And
"They miss to discuss new ideas." is NOT OK, but "They miss discussing new ideas." IS OK.

I have a feeling that the choice is related to whether the action is a "one-time thing" or an ongoing process: the former would use the infinitive, the latter would use a gerund. For some good information on this whole issue, see http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/627/01/
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