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HWNN1961
Posted: Sunday, January 30, 2011 10:19:51 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/13/2010
Posts: 3,494
Neurons: 9,763
Tell TFD members about your hometown, what is important to you about it, what you like, what the people are like. Make us feel like we’ve been there, walked the streets, make the unfamiliar familiar. I’ll start off:

I live in an inner-ring suburb of Buffalo, New York. My home is about a mile from the city line, in a working-class neighborhood of wood-frame homes and small yards. These are not the cramped row-homes with no yards of the inner city, nor are they the pretentious McMansions of the outer-ring suburbs. Most people here are first time home owners, and house-proud.

You can learn a lot about the values of a locale by the layout of the residential areas. Some have bemoaned the fact that you can judge a people best by what they build. Once, people built soaring Cathedrals, now, we build huge shopping Malls. Once people worshipped the almighty, now we worship the almighty dollar, commerce is king, in God we Trust, all others pay cash…..But, I digress.

From the air, you would see my suburb as a grid of streets mostly laid out on 90 degree angles, parallel to and perpendicular to other streets. The town was designed for people to be able to get efficiently from one place to the next. This pattern suggests trust, a sense of a shared destiny. The people that planned this community trusted in progress and a shared future. Sometime in the mid 20th century, that shared vision and trust deteriorated into “us” and “them”. Newer suburbs have streets that end in cul-de-sacs. Some of these literally have storm sewers that are open like moats around the cul-de-sac. There are even gated communities. Thus to keep out the riff-raff. The unspoken message is as demoralizing as it is clear: we don’t trust, we build our neighborhoods in circles, the way pioneers circled their wagons against the “savage” Indians. Well, I guess I live in Indian country.

Still, overall, I like the people and the area. Buffalo has a lot of house fires. Wood was plentiful, and cheaper than bricks, so much of the city and the inner suburbs is constructed entirely of wood. The city neighborhoods have many row-home neighborhoods, a relic of the company neighborhoods that sprang up around the vast steel mills that this area once was home to during its industrial period. Along with monuments to past industrial glory, the expansive brown-fields where Bethlehem and Republic Steel once lit up the night with their blast furnaces and foundries, there are rare gems of century old architecture.

We have Delaware Park developed by Olmstead. We have the Richardson Complex, Darwin-Martin house developed by the renown Frank Lloyd Wright. There is the Gotham-city charm of city hall, and other treasures worthy of note.

Buffalo is like a small Chicago: Irish, German, Polish immigrants to start with. After the Civil War, there was a massive migration of freed men to the area, seeking steady work in the factories, on the docks, and on the waterfront. By the way, there are several homes used in the Underground Railroad here as well. The next wave of immigrants came from the islands, and from Mexico.

This makes for a very diverse community. We celebrate our cultural heritage with festivals all through the summer season: the Italian festival, the Greek festival, our own version of Oktoberfest.

We celebrate our illustrious Chicken Wing. We have a beer festival. On the seventh day, God rested. He feasted on Bison Lager and Anchor Bar wings...and He proclaimed it to be good!

What is Buffalo and Western New York now, in the absence of heavy industry? Well, we are a gigantic college town. This only adds to the diversity. It fosters the artistic community on Elmwood Avenue. We have the Allentown Art festival that draws talent from all over North America.

I did say that Buffalo is a college town: there is the enormous University of Buffalo (our UB Bulls finally made a bowl game a couple years ago), Canisius College (think a smaller version of Notre Dame), Daemen College, Buffalo State College, Medaille College, Erie Community College City, North and South Campus, Niagara College, and there are more. The night life is great, on Main Street on Chippewa, up and down Elmwood Avenue. North Tonawanda seems to have a pub on every street corner.

We love our sports; we live and die by our Buffalo Bills football team, and our Buffalo Sabres. When the Bills lost to the Giants in Super bowl XXV 20 years ago, the city turned out in tens of thousands to welcome our heroes home. Our celebration of their achievements in defeat put the victory celebrations of many cities to shame. We stand by our own in good times and in bad. There are still bumper stickers that say “No Goal” after the disputed Brett Hull goal in game six of the 1999 Stanley Cup Finals. Old timers remember The Jack Kemp and Cookie Gilcrist Bills of the old AFL, and the back-to-back championships they won in the 1960s. Our kids play soccer in the summer and hockey in the winter.

Winter…yes, that’s us. We of the Blizzard of 1977. I was here. I recall snow banks taller than the roofs of our garages….being snowbound for a week and more. A federal disaster area declared for a snowstorm for the first time ever. It was a frigid adventure for me, but, the adults were clearly getting worried. Tough is one thing, but that was just of the charts! It seems that winter defines the world’s perception of my area. Well, we consistently get our share of snow. The same Great Lakes that provide cooling breezes in the summer also generate blinding snow squalls and winds in the winter. Lake Erie just froze, so we are (mostly) off the hook for our famed lake-effect….but, lake Ontario often enhances the intensity of the snowfall from coastal storms and those that skirt the Appalachians. So, we’ll have snow until April at the least. But, winter doesn’t really define us. See Western New York communities from the air. The sheer number of swimming pools is amazing. We squeeze every dram of sunlight and warmth from summer. We have swimming pools though the swimming season isn’t very long. Many of us own boats, go fishing, own cabins. I don’t own a cabin, but I sure do rent one whenever I can. The rapidly growing fame of the Finger Lakes Wine Region, some 100 miles or so from me, is a favorite stop of mine. Now, along the Niagara Escarpment, there are dozens of wineries, restaurants, Bed and Breakfasts, and camping areas springing up. I went to a new winery yesterday, sipped an excellent Meritage, and watched a sun-flurry muffle my view of the vineyards. One could do worse!

I have been all over the world in my military travels. I’ve seen things that I’m grateful for the opportunity to experience. But, I know where home is. This, my Buffalo, is the home of my heart, and I will not voluntarily leave here again. All places have their ups and downs. My preference is to stay, to protect what is right, fix what is wrong, and enjoy an ever deepening appreciation for what my home offers.

Now, if you would do me the honor of telling me about your area, I’d be fascinated to hear!
Babezy
Posted: Sunday, January 30, 2011 11:02:29 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/16/2009
Posts: 926
Neurons: 2,806
Location: United States
Loved your post, love the idea of sharing, but am afraid of getting too specific with my real-life information. Would it be playing fair if I told you about my town (either where I grew up or where I live now) without identifying details?
HWNN1961
Posted: Sunday, January 30, 2011 11:09:43 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/13/2010
Posts: 3,494
Neurons: 9,763
Babezy wrote:
Loved your post, love the idea of sharing, but am afraid of getting too specific with my real-life information. Would it be playing fair if I told you about my town (either where I grew up or where I live now) without identifying details?



Absolutely!


I played that same angle. By saying only that I'm near the city line, and from an inner ring suburb, I could be from Lackawanna, West Seneca, Cheektowaga, Tonawanda or Kenmore.

Share what you are comfortable with. The details of your home town are of concern, not the details of your own household. Do share.
Alias
Posted: Monday, January 31, 2011 1:53:29 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/12/2010
Posts: 676
Neurons: 1,993
Location: Australia
I live in shoebox in middle of road..(spoken with a thick Yorkshire accent)
worldsclyde
Posted: Monday, January 31, 2011 2:25:46 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/24/2010
Posts: 785
Neurons: 2,390
Location: Spokane, WA USA
nodogz
Posted: Monday, January 31, 2011 2:41:55 AM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 1/31/2011
Posts: 1
Neurons: 3
Location: United States
Hey there,

Your post has inspired me to at last join this forum. If you want to know where I grew up and the scences and scents here we go.

I grew up on the Gulf coast of Florida USA, just inland of the sea but on a river that's only claim to fame is Jaques Custeau coming to dive in our caves and pet our manatees. I have swan with said manatees and also the resident alligators. But the day to day reality
is most folk never see any of this.

I now live in California and when I drive on Highway 37 I get the low tide smell that reminds me of my youth and the places i loved to grub in as a child.
gradyone
Posted: Monday, January 31, 2011 3:39:28 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/12/2010
Posts: 2,420
Neurons: 12,277
Location: Virgil, Illinois, United States

Like H-Man, I live outside the big city, but farther, out in the boonies. Sometimes I feel so Lackawanna.

Yet an long hour's train ride takes me to the heart of downtown Chicago. And what a huge heart it is.
Now it's very cold down there. I'll go back again in the spring. Look for me then.
Rusty
Posted: Monday, January 31, 2011 4:19:49 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/29/2011
Posts: 148
Neurons: 450
HWNN1961 that was a great post. You got me really curious about Buffalo. As for me-
I live in Mumbai at present but my hometown is Udaipur, a small city in the state of Rajasthan, India. Rajasthan as such is famous for stories of valour and Rajput(a warrior and ruling class) pride and this is what Udaipur is all about. Its a tourist city with beautiful lakes, hills and lots of places of tourist interest in nearby areas, for eg. Jaiselmer a man made lake about 27kms long is just 50 kms away.

The city like most other Indian cities is not very well planned but it's a place where you buy colourful Indian and particularly Rajput garments, beautiful metal artefacts, dine in some of the world's best hotels and hear fascinating stories of valour and sacrifice. Because of high taxes on restaurants serving alcohol there are not many bars and pubs and we have only one shopping mall and one multiplex theatre but there are lots of beautiful restaurants and some very beautiful bars overlooking lakes or among hills and just a little expensive.

The charm of the city for me is in its hills, apart from crowded popular lakes there are lakes surrounded by hills where you can take a pack of beer and enjoy the solitude or take a swim in calm waters or make love on a bed of rocks or just explore hundreds of temples that dot the landscape. Even if you are not religious the journey to the temples itself is fascinating.

For the tourists from India and abroad there are lot of cultural shows and performances going on throughout the year but the best time to be in Udaipur is in the month of October and November when the rains are just over and all the hills are covered in a green carpet of different shades but the place remains a haven till mid March before the summer kicks in.

Though it hasn't got the glitter of a large metropolitan and there is no nightlife(everything shuts down by eleven pm) I love the city for its natural beauty, the hills, the places to visit nearby and solitude it can offer if you so desire. Also the city is safe. I haven't heard a single case of mugging in my entire life.
For me this is the place to be, to finally settle down.
ludic
Posted: Monday, January 31, 2011 4:49:41 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 12/7/2010
Posts: 1,153
Neurons: 3,544
Location: New Delhi, NCT, India
make love on a bed of rocks, you mean outdoors? In India? No one would dare!

थू थू हो जाएगी गाँव में !!

Whistle
srirr
Posted: Monday, January 31, 2011 4:58:16 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 12/29/2009
Posts: 8,507
Neurons: 484,288
ludic wrote:
make love on a bed of rocks, you mean outdoors? In India? No one would dare!

थू थू हो जाएगी गाँव में !!

Whistle


Hats off to your imagination, you naughty girl. Rusty never said outdoors. But what I could imagine was the hardness of rocks. It will hurt. Oouch!
Rusty
Posted: Monday, January 31, 2011 5:15:17 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/29/2011
Posts: 148
Neurons: 450
Really? outdoor love making is not possible in India?? How many examples you want? and am not even talking about the remote hills am talking public- parks, fields etc. heh heh come on, don't be naive.
intelfam
Posted: Monday, January 31, 2011 5:47:08 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/18/2010
Posts: 1,190
Neurons: 3,284
Location: United Kingdom
A shoebox? Luxury, Alias! Never saw 'ome. 28 hours a day down t'pit, cum 'ome, milk the cows, plough t'ten acre field, and dad would hit us with t'belt till we wuz dead! Kids today!
dlux3
Posted: Monday, January 31, 2011 6:03:30 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 12/22/2010
Posts: 188
Neurons: 557
Location: Cairns, Far North Queensland, Australia
Ours is a modest home. It has room for all and it encourages free thought and literature. It disparages poor behaviour and laxness, which is not popular with some of it's inhabitants.

There is a fair chance it's going to be levelled shortly by a hurricane.

Cest la vie. Que sera sera.


richsap
Posted: Monday, January 31, 2011 8:16:51 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/16/2010
Posts: 275
Neurons: 1,510
I grew up in the state of New Mexico ("desert" type of climate) but moved to the capital of Arkansas, Little Rock, at age 13 and have been there more or less since then. The climate is typically a long hot humid summer and a relatively mild winter and in between those two seasons we have a wonderful spring and fall that always seem to short.

Little Rock is by world standards a small city. Technically we have Little Rock and North Little Rock separated by the Arkansas river, but most folks just call the whole think Little Rock. Both cities have their own government and police force.

The states main source of income is farming, typically cotton and soybeans. There was at one time a lot of manufacturing scattered about the state but most of that has been outsourced to other countries. Its hard to say where most of the revenues come from these days... I think instead of a few dozen large manufacturing facilities we now have thousands of medium and small businesses. Farming has transitioned from small family-owned farms to mega-farms owned by corporations. Agriculture is still the #1 export in the state, and it was a culture shock when I moved from New Mexico to hear "farm reports" on the television and radio so frequently (updates on prices of rice, soybeans, cotton, hog futures, etc.).

We don't have too much crime to contend with and the highways that pass through the state are relatively congestion free. We have typical "rush hour" traffic in the city, in particular on the three bridges that connect the two cities, but it is short lived for only a couple of hours a day, morning and afternoon.

A short drive from the city you will find smaller cities and towns with all the charm that comes from small-town environments. Throughout the state the people are warm and friendly... those that aren't are run off to Buffalo, New York. (JUST KIDDING!)

It is not unusual between spring and fall to have many outdoor activities along the banks of the river, which have been made into beautiful parks with well-manicured grass and trees. Each city hosts several festivals each year, the largest being "Riverfest" that is co-sponsered by both cities each spring. This festival consists of many bands from all venues, circus-like sideshows and of course food and drink vendors. As a sidebar, the festival used to be free until about fifteen years ago, and the cities decided to charge admission to keep unsupervised teenagers and the homeless from wandering about and creating trouble. Each year the price as gone up... I can only guess that the teenagers and homeless have become more affluent... or perhaps the cities have developed a cash cow?

The people here in the South have thier own regional dialect which most refer to as "Southern Twang". Of course, I lack the twang having not grown up here as well as the immunity to the high humidity of summer. Arkansas is also known for attracting tornadoes during the late winter to early summer months. Fortunately (unless you live there) they are for the most part attracted to mobile home villages. In reality, they strike everywhere but since mobile homes come apart far more easily than homes with foundations, the pictures are much more vivid and therefore more newsworthy.

Arkansas has a reputation for being the backward home for hillbillies, people who typically wear tattered clothing, no shoes, are uneducated and drink homemade liquor from jugs. I am proud to say that since Bill Clinton made the state famous (or infamous) after his stint as U.S. President we have reformed... we all wear shoes now. Applause
Cat
Posted: Monday, January 31, 2011 9:23:42 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/10/2010
Posts: 967
Neurons: 194,017
Location: Waterloo, Ontario, Canada
I've not lived anywhere long enough to call any place "home". Moving at the wrong times in life can do that too. I'm very envious of you HWNN1961.

However, there is one place I lived that felt like "home" even before I knew anyone there and that was Portland, Oregon. I don't know why but I felt like I fit there. I have moved there four times and have had to move away again. So, even though I didn't grow up there, haven't lived there for more than two years at a time, and don't know anyone there, it's the closest I have to feeling at home. I may try one more time to live there and stay.

Meanwhile, my kids are growing up in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada and after five years now consider themselves Canadian more than American. This is going to be their home and I refuse to move again until they are done with school.
REDTRUCK12
Posted: Monday, January 31, 2011 11:22:32 AM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 1/31/2011
Posts: 2
Neurons: 6
Location: Canada
interesting topic
i live in cambridge ontario canada, population aprox. 120,000 and is about 1 hour s.w. of toronto. our home is a detached raised bungalow on a lot that measures roughly 45feet wide by 120feet deep on a crescent near the outskirts of the city. it is of wood frame construction with a brick exterior. square footage measures aprox. 1500 sq.ft. but has a full and finished basement measuring roughly the same. it has a attached single car garage.
this reigon gets winter with snow from late november to late march and temperatures that average below freezing for most of that time period. fortunately we do not normally receive minus 20s or 30s very often like some areas of our province, summers dao get quite warm but not unbearable 30 to 33 c is usually as hot as we get during june and july and into erly august. the thing i like most about this reigon is the changes in season and even though winter can seem long and cold i personally would rather spend the entire day outside in thc cold than in summer. fall would have to be my favorite time of year. cool crisp morning air, no bugs and warm sunshine to take the morning frost away. wi get the fun of winter, skiing, sledding, skating etc. in winter and also the beauty of summer with white sandy beaches and west coast sunsets on lake huron rival those of any where in the world i am told. proud to call this home. canada is not perfect but better than most in my opinion - or al least for me it is
ellana
Posted: Monday, January 31, 2011 12:05:48 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 12/19/2010
Posts: 673
Neurons: 127,363
Location: Roquefort, Provence-Alpes-Cote d'Azur, France
Life's circumstances and personal choices have me currently anchored (rooted is too permanent) in the south of France where I enjoy a semi rural lifestyle, off the tourist beaten path, where daily life is close to excellent. I'm getting my French back, hiking over splendid landscpae with kindred spirits, attending conferences on history, architecture and art, teaching English as an avocation but overall living the quiet life. Best of all, I live next to my family after years apart due mainly to work and migration constraints. I once called myself the queen of adversity when doing volunteer work in the boonies of Cambodia but now find myself wearing the tiara of good fortune.
chopperpilot01
Posted: Monday, January 31, 2011 1:15:49 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 12/2/2009
Posts: 251
Neurons: 722
Location: Eastern North Carolina, United States
I live in a small town called Bethel North Carolina with a population of 1,468 people. My friends and I do not have much to do around town...at least not the kind of things we would tell people. We also like to hunt, fish, and ride 4-wheelers and trucks through the mud. My best friend lives on a horse farm and I usually go to help out around there. The best entertainment is my 1995 GMC sierra and his 1972 El Camino. Our town just got rid of its only traffic light and grocery store so it is only getting smaller.
My friend and I are sixteen so it is difficult to go very far without people wondering what happened to us but its okay because there is nowhere around us that we could really go.
I help my family out by driving a tractor on a farm and I also do my best in school.
Being in such a small town growing up is challenging but it is worth it.
I will admit that being in a country town where nobody pays attention to what people are doing has led me to do a few things that I should not have such as I started smoking last year, started sneaking out of the house, and tried alcohol (which i did not like at all). I am currently trying to quit smoking but it is very challenging.
Maybe one day I will leave this small town but Im sure I will return someday.
:)
Vickster
Posted: Monday, January 31, 2011 2:36:32 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/19/2010
Posts: 2,404
Neurons: 7,211
Location: Massachusetts, United States
sorry... had to say this... chopper...stop smoking now while you can... because it'll only get harder... ok...continue...
Vickster
Posted: Monday, January 31, 2011 2:44:14 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/19/2010
Posts: 2,404
Neurons: 7,211
Location: Massachusetts, United States
Not much to say about my little town except that most of the people seem very nice... except those who work at the town hall...lol. Everyone asks why I don't move closer to Boston since I work there... I hate the city and will never leave my qaint little quiet town. When you want to cross the street... they stop for you and wave with a smile.. Boston is full of rude arrogant people... it's bad enough I work there. I like returning home to peace and quiet... where when I step out of my car, my neighbor waves to me or someone drives by and beeps. I like that I can sit on my porch and have a glass of wine and watch the geese lazily glide by on the pond. I like that my little guy can play in his back yard and not have to worry about a drive by shooting or someone snatching him... My neighbors are kind and generous. When they see me struggle... they come help. We share vegi's in the summertime.. We watch each others houses when someone's away... and call the police if we see something suspicious... we take care of each other... That's a small town... where people are still considerate... That's where my home is... that's where I'll stay...
F.D.S.O.
Posted: Monday, January 31, 2011 5:02:16 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 12/9/2010
Posts: 64
Neurons: 188
Location: United States-West Memphis AR
Rich you hit Arkansas on the nose and gave a great description of little rock I never came to little rock much as a kid but my National Guard unit is there so I visit once a month. I’m from the far east part of the state about ten miles from Memphis TN so our local news is from Memphis and most of the people on this end of the state (besides the farmers you mentioned) work in Memphis. Unlike little rock i live in what’s called the delta its FLAT farm land on the banks of the Mississippi river. Perfect for soy beans and cotton we don’t grow as much rice as little rock or Stuttgart (duck and rice capital of the world). We have great duck and deer hunting not to mention fishing. the town i was raised in is about 30 miles south of west Memphis it’s a small lake town population 311 growing up in a place like that was great i know everyone and they know me. as far as crime I’ll put it this way my parents don’t have keys to their house because they have never locked the door (we went to Florida for a week and left the door unlocked our neighbor left a note saying she got some flower while we were gone). I enjoy my home and don’t ever plan on moving.
chopperpilot01
Posted: Monday, January 31, 2011 5:08:49 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 12/2/2009
Posts: 251
Neurons: 722
Location: Eastern North Carolina, United States
Vickster
I am working on it because you are right. It is challenging now so imagine what it will be like when i am older.
Cass
Posted: Monday, January 31, 2011 5:12:38 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 12/19/2009
Posts: 589
Neurons: 1,770
Location: United States
I'd like to tell you about the town that raised me, Ipswich, one of the oldest towns in England that was thriving in the 7th century. It sits on a river that flows into the North Sea and lies about 70-odd miles north-east of London. Today the population is about 128,000 but it was a lot smaller when I grew up there. It's most famous citizen (if you don't count Alf Ramsey) was Cardinal Thomas Wolsey, son of an Ipswich butcher. The school he founded for boys still turns out worthy citizens.

When I was there, the shops were closed on Sundays and during the week they closed around supper time. We had lovely parks to play in, the rivers to explore as well as heathland. It was quiet and bucolic, mainly farming and farm equipment manufacturing for jobs. Ransomes and Rapiers made equipment and machinery that was sold world-wide. Sadly those great firms are no longer. We have a football team that was once inspired enough to win the FA Cup - they still talk about it. Farmers still find treasure when plowing, and our knowledge of Ipswich grows and grows. It will always be home to me, no matter where I live.

I have enjoyed very much reading your pieces, written with feeling and warm with memories. I loved your drawing Clyde - I take it you were the artist.
HWNN1961
Posted: Monday, January 31, 2011 5:56:28 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/13/2010
Posts: 3,494
Neurons: 9,763
Cass,

I'd love to visit your area. I' a history buff,and would enjoy exploring. I believe that Cardinal Wolsey would have been well-advised to remain in happy obscurity in Ipswich. Sometimes going to the big city and King Henry's court causes one to lose their head.....
HWNN1961
Posted: Monday, January 31, 2011 6:05:44 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/13/2010
Posts: 3,494
Neurons: 9,763
Rich,

Thanks for your description of Arkansas, and specifically, Little Rock. Several years ago, the BRAC commission recommended a consolidation of Air Reserve bases that fly C-130 missions. The idea was to close several smaller locations, such as mine at Niagara Falls, and form a "Super Wing" at Little Rock AFB. If that had gone through, I'd quite probably have been your neighbor. I like the sound of Little Rock (except for the hot humid summers...I'm a northern person, and do much better in the cold than I do in the heat).
wercozy
Posted: Monday, January 31, 2011 6:39:05 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/1/2009
Posts: 1,470
Neurons: 3,480
Location: United States
I live every where.

When I was a child I lived in a very big home with a very big yard. Guess who had to clean the house, fix the meals, and pull weeds all day if not doing homework? I vowed I would never have a home like that when I left for good. I kept my vow. My home is a moderate size, and manageable housework shared by everyone living in the house. I kept the big yard though. I now garden with the help of everyone who likes to eat fresh vegetables, salad, fruit desert, grape juice and wine.
Babezy
Posted: Monday, January 31, 2011 7:14:51 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/16/2009
Posts: 926
Neurons: 2,806
Location: United States
I live outside a very small city (really a town, but they count the farming residents around it) in the Midwestern U.S. The city was built in the 1800s, so the main street is very wide because it used to accommodate horse-drawn vehicles. On either side of the main street are buildings from the 1800s lined up wall-to-wall. The stores sell modern goods but have creaky wooden floors and pressed-tin ceilings. There are a lot of old houses (old by American standards), with large porches and shady yards.

My house is in a subdivision outside of town, a dead-end street branching into other dead-end streets, so we don't get people zooming through on their way somewhere else. We live on five acres of slightly rolling ground, with lots of trees, old and young, and lots of conifer and hosta gardens (that's my husband's passion). There's a sandpit/mudpit for the kids, dug out of the side of one of the slight hills. There are decks and porches around the house, but the house is modern.

I like that the town is family-friendly, with good schools and lots of parks and family activities. We have wonderful neighbors; some treat our kids like their own grandchildren and keep an eye on things, and some smile and wave and leave us in peace. There's some crime and danger everywhere, but a little less here. And when small-town life makes me want to run screaming through the fields, real cities are within an hour's drive in several directions.
richsap
Posted: Tuesday, February 1, 2011 10:11:50 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/16/2010
Posts: 275
Neurons: 1,510
Was orginally stationed at Eaker AFB (formerly Blytheville AFB) just 60 or so miles from West Memphis. Been to Memphis and West Memphis many, many times. Blytheville is a small farming community (the AFB was shut down a decade or so ago) and there was not much for a young man to do there, so we would drive to Memphis for our fun. After I left that area I would travel back to visit friends and saw it in a different light.

As I grew older I actually missed the slower pace, the smaller community where everyone knows your name. That is part of the problem with the world today... if you live in a city where it is highly unlikely you will run into the same stranger twice, you're not very likely to be nice to him/her. But if you know you'll see them later in the day you tend to treat them a lot better, like you would a family member or coworker.

As an aside, I once worked for a very large aerospace company that had labor issues. They built a small "satellite" facility in Arkansas and as a social experiment did not allow the workforce to exceed 200 people. That was one of the best places I ever worked. Just as with a small town, everyone had your back and whether it was work related or personal they were there for you.
Alias
Posted: Tuesday, February 1, 2011 11:08:12 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/12/2010
Posts: 676
Neurons: 1,993
Location: Australia
nodogz wrote:
Hey there,

Your post has inspired me to at last join this forum. If you want to know where I grew up and the scences and scents here we go.

I grew up on the Gulf coast of Florida USA, just inland of the sea but on a river that's only claim to fame is Jaques Custeau coming to dive in our caves and pet our manatees. I have swan with said manatees and also the resident alligators. But the day to day reality
is most folk never see any of this.

I now live in California and when I drive on Highway 37 I get the low tide smell that reminds me of my youth and the places i loved to grub in as a child.


I can smell those smells and sense the atmosphere....thanks so much for sharing your home with us Nodogz!
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