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preposition, conjunction, adverb Options
Miriam...
Posted: Sunday, November 15, 2015 7:57:22 PM

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Joined: 12/20/2012
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What are the meanings of theses words:

"preposition , conjunction , adverb "

pre position ~ a word that takes a 'position' before another word?

con junction ~ a word that 'joins' a junction?

* No, NO NO! Now I see! (after my sentence below) it separates a junctions; but it is suppose to bring them together...?*

ad verb ~ an additional verb?

Grammar terms are con fusing(See! this word does not join, but separates) to me.

I feel like I could make sense of grammar meanings at the drop of a hat if I could visualize their meanings as I was saying them, or using them in a sentence.


This post doesn't belong here, so it can be answered someplace else.

I'll just move it now, so I won't disrupt the thread.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, November 16, 2015 7:16:15 AM

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Hi Miriam.

Well you just need to look at the words in the correct manner . . .



If you half-close your right eye and hold your head to one side and look out of the corner of your left eye, it all becomes clear. d'oh! Whistle

It is true that 'preposition' was named because a very common place to find it is in a position before a noun. "The cat sat on the mat", "He went up the hill." However, that is not the only position . . .

A conjunction forms a junction of one sentence with another sentence, or one noun phrase with another.
"I went to the shop and I bought milk."; "He knows French but he doesn't know Greek."; "This post doesn't belong here, so it can be answered someplacesomewhere else."; I'll just move it now, so I won't disrupt the thread."; "She likes ice-cream and cakes.";

An adverb adds more specifics to a verb. Though there are other uses too . . .Brick wall
He went. - He quickly went out to the car to get his bag.

I hope that helps. Anxious Anxious
TheParser
Posted: Monday, November 16, 2015 7:40:58 AM
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***** NOT A TEACHER *****


Don't feel bad, Miriam:

Some experts, in fact, have said (only half jokingly) that when a grammar book does not know how to label a word, it just uses the word "adverb."

I have made up these sentences. The emphasized words are usually labeled as "adverbs."

1. Seriously, do you actually intend to marry Mona?


2. She is seriously ill.

3. He is very nice.

4. She slowly put on her hat.

As you can see, the adverb in #1 modifies the whole sentence; in #2, the adjective "ill"; in #3, the adjective "nice"; and in #4, the verb "put on." NOTE: There are even grammarians who claim that "slowly" in #4 modifies the whole sentence. Their reasoning is that "slowly" can be moved around: Slowly, she put on her hat. / She put on her hat slowly.

Miriam...
Posted: Tuesday, November 17, 2015 11:28:04 AM

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Joined: 12/20/2012
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Thank you, Parser and dragOn. I will study this more later.🌸
P.s. I like the picture:)
Why is 'someplace' incorrect? Why should 'somewhere' be used?
Passion for phonics
Posted: Tuesday, November 17, 2015 1:38:36 PM
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Miriam... wrote:
Thank you, Parser and dragOn. I will study this more later.🌸
P.s. I like the picture:)
Why is 'someplace' incorrect? Why should 'somewhere' be used?


Here is one answer:
The adverbial forms everyplace (or every place), anyplace (or any place), someplace (or some place), and no place are widely used in speech and informal writing as equivalents for everywhere, anywhere, somewhere, and nowhere. These usages may be well established, but they are not normally used in formal writing. However, when the two-word expressions every place, any place, some place, and no place are used to mean "every (any, some, no) spot or location," they are entirely appropriate at all levels of style.
Source: TFD
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, November 18, 2015 5:18:25 AM

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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hi Miriam.

It is my prejudices showing, I'm afraid.

If you look at "anyplace" in the Collins (English) Dictionary, there is a big sign saying "WARNING! American only!" - Liar

Well, actually, what the sign says is "US and Canada".

"Someplace" has the same warning, but "everyplace" does not even appear in the English dictionary.
Passion for phonics
Posted: Wednesday, November 18, 2015 11:16:57 AM
Rank: Member

Joined: 8/18/2015
Posts: 595
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Drag0nspeaker wrote:
"everyplace" does not even appear in the English dictionary.


Unless you are using the online version of Collins !
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, November 18, 2015 12:02:54 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 34,427
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Aaaggh - even the Collins dictionary has been contaminated!
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