mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest
antonym of postpone? Options
srkdr68
Posted: Wednesday, January 19, 2011 10:42:33 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/13/2011
Posts: 160
Neurons: 312
Location: India
Is 'prepone' an antonym of 'postpone'?
abcxyz
Posted: Wednesday, January 19, 2011 10:49:40 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/13/2009
Posts: 1,056
Neurons: 3,200
Location: India
srkdr68 wrote:
Is 'prepone' an antonym of 'postpone'?


Only in Indian English.
abihook
Posted: Wednesday, January 19, 2011 11:12:51 AM
Rank: Member

Joined: 12/9/2009
Posts: 18
Neurons: 54
Location: United Kingdom
Try expediate?
TOOTS
Posted: Wednesday, January 19, 2011 11:16:46 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/7/2010
Posts: 1,369
Neurons: 4,026
Location: United Kingdom
What is the opposite of Postpone?
"PREPONE" The word 'prepone' is found in The New Oxford Dictionary of English, published 1998. It is listed as being Indian (from India) and is defined as: to bring forward to an earlier date or time.
srkdr68
Posted: Wednesday, January 19, 2011 11:28:01 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/13/2011
Posts: 160
Neurons: 312
Location: India
TOOTS wrote:
What is the opposite of Postpone?
"PREPONE" The word 'prepone' is found in The New Oxford Dictionary of English, published 1998. It is listed as being Indian (from India) and is defined as: to bring forward to an earlier date or time.



Dancing Dancing Dancing Dancing
xsmith
Posted: Wednesday, January 19, 2011 12:59:26 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/26/2009
Posts: 433
Neurons: 4,497
execute?
expedite?
blahblah
Posted: Wednesday, January 19, 2011 4:42:31 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/26/2010
Posts: 197
Neurons: 570
Location: United States
Prepone - what a great word! Love the way the English language grows..

srkdr68 the antonym of 'postpone' that I am most familiar with is the expression, 'to bring forward.'

For example:

The meeting has been brought forward to Monday.
Ravindra
Posted: Thursday, January 20, 2011 11:39:23 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/23/2009
Posts: 741
Neurons: 79,642
Location: Bangalore, Karnataka, India
Like pre-operative care and post-operative care; pre-war and post-war, 'postpone' can not be made into pre-pone and post-pone, as postpone is one word. This is coined and widely used by Indians. As such, the Oxford has recognised it. We can use 'advance' against postpone.
Momsey
Posted: Thursday, January 20, 2011 2:35:55 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/4/2009
Posts: 211
Neurons: 23,879
Might I suggest "pre-empt"? It seems to fit. Otherwise, I will definitely go with "bring forward".
GreenSleeves
Posted: Thursday, January 20, 2011 3:26:58 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/14/2011
Posts: 88
Neurons: 270
Location: Canada
abihook wrote:
Try expediate?


d'oh!
Dont you realize that expediate is the OPOSITE of postpone?
GreenSleeves
Posted: Thursday, January 20, 2011 3:32:13 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/14/2011
Posts: 88
Neurons: 270
Location: Canada
Momsey wrote:
Might I suggest "pre-empt"? It seems to fit. Otherwise, I will definitely go with "bring forward".


Angel Ravindra is ritgh!
GreenSleeves
Posted: Thursday, January 20, 2011 3:40:27 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/14/2011
Posts: 88
Neurons: 270
Location: Canada
xsmith wrote:
execute?
expedite?


Boo hoo! The problem is: Postpone - Prepone; are two different words.
Postpone means..(to execute later )!
GreenSleeves
Posted: Thursday, January 20, 2011 5:04:27 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/14/2011
Posts: 88
Neurons: 270
Location: Canada
Momsey wrote:
Might I suggest "pre-empt"? It seems to fit. Otherwise, I will definitely go with "bring forward".

- preempt means to avoid, (for such and such), not to happen!!!
GreenSleeves
Posted: Thursday, January 20, 2011 5:09:59 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/14/2011
Posts: 88
Neurons: 270
Location: Canada
xsmith wrote:
execute?
expedite?

Angel
- postpone the execution! (ordered by the Governor).
thar
Posted: Thursday, January 20, 2011 6:45:16 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 25,768
Neurons: 104,595
Is no-one else going to state the obvious missing link?

from the latin
post is after
pre is before, in front of
ante is before, earlier

so it is antepone!

Whistle
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Thursday, January 20, 2011 8:23:15 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/21/2009
Posts: 47,898
Neurons: 675,964
Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
foreplay?
chuckc4th
Posted: Saturday, January 29, 2011 9:40:08 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/26/2009
Posts: 179
Neurons: 537
Location: United States
advance?
Arfax
Posted: Wednesday, February 2, 2011 4:33:38 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/29/2010
Posts: 103
Neurons: 273
Location: France
anticipate ?

4. To cause to happen in advance; accelerate.
5. To use in advance, as income not yet available.

pedro
Posted: Wednesday, February 2, 2011 4:59:04 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/21/2009
Posts: 13,057
Neurons: 63,022
Ravindra wrote:
Like pre-operative care and post-operative care; pre-war and post-war, 'postpone' can not be made into pre-pone and post-pone, as postpone is one word. This is coined and widely used by Indians. As such, the Oxford has recognised it. We can use 'advance' against postpone.



If there is a pre-pone and a post-pone then in between there must be an actual moment when you pone. I've never experienced it but since it is instantaneous that's no surprise.
lenam
Posted: Wednesday, February 2, 2011 5:19:57 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/22/2010
Posts: 1,282
Neurons: 3,816
Location: India
TFD definition for pone: ...means cakes of cornbread baked on a griddle or in hot ashesas the Native Americans originally cooked it.
Gunjika
Posted: Wednesday, February 2, 2011 6:17:48 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/10/2011
Posts: 376
Neurons: 1,127
Location: India
Ah... yes! Reminds me of Pone... oops.. Gone With The Wind.
TOOTS
Posted: Wednesday, February 2, 2011 6:29:33 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/7/2010
Posts: 1,369
Neurons: 4,026
Location: United Kingdom
........ or an actual moment when you can use your mobile pone to prepone the postponed event..........
srirr
Posted: Thursday, February 3, 2011 4:09:39 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 12/29/2009
Posts: 8,507
Neurons: 484,353
Isn't using prepone preposterous?

Now thats a word which has both pre- and post-.
Brick wall Brick wall
srirr
Posted: Monday, February 28, 2011 6:16:02 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 12/29/2009
Posts: 8,507
Neurons: 484,353
While reading an article, this thread quickly popped in my mind.

There is a very common word Postmortem. Just like postpone, we do not have premortem or even mortem-on-time. Brick wall Brick wall
pedro
Posted: Monday, February 28, 2011 6:22:04 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/21/2009
Posts: 13,057
Neurons: 63,022
Fear not, your mortem will come.
thar
Posted: Monday, February 28, 2011 6:34:51 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 25,768
Neurons: 104,595
srirr wrote:
While reading an article, this thread quickly popped in my mind.

There is a very common word Postmortem. Just like postpone, we do not have premortem or even mortem-on-time. Brick wall Brick wall


ahah, my suggestion proved - in cop shows the injuries are ante-mortem, peri-mortem or post-mortem.

So when you arrange to arrive a few minutes either way, you can peripone something!
gagangandhi
Posted: Tuesday, March 1, 2011 11:32:18 PM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 3/1/2011
Posts: 2
Neurons: 6
Location: india
premortem:-)
Gunjika
Posted: Wednesday, March 2, 2011 2:07:29 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/10/2011
Posts: 376
Neurons: 1,127
Location: India
I was wondering if I could get a predated check instead of a postdated one!Think
jacobusmaximus
Posted: Wednesday, March 2, 2011 3:16:06 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/17/2009
Posts: 14,056
Neurons: 721,977
Location: Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom
Isn't 'prepone' what HRH Prince Charles says to the nurse before his operation?
milinad
Posted: Wednesday, March 2, 2011 3:26:41 AM
Rank: Member

Joined: 8/20/2009
Posts: 40
Neurons: 71,030
Location: Pune, Maharashtra, India
chuckc4th wrote:
advance?


I agree with Chuck, it is advance
mohican
Posted: Friday, March 4, 2011 2:32:31 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/24/2010
Posts: 284
Neurons: 848
Location: Poland
accelerate
advance
expedite
forward
hasten
hurry
precipitate
promote
quicken
rush
speed
urge
Ellenrita
Posted: Friday, March 4, 2011 2:43:26 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/20/2010
Posts: 1,348
Neurons: 3,889
Location: CANADA - Toronto
prepare - present
asdofindia
Posted: Friday, March 4, 2011 9:29:08 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/17/2009
Posts: 129
Neurons: 391
just because i saw this.

how would you tell someone the bad news that the meeting they arrived for was conducted on the previous day (because of this rescheduling) in a single sentence with a few words as possible... (try to include any of the antonyms of postpone) ... and convey the meaning you intend to...
RuthP
Posted: Monday, March 7, 2011 10:46:56 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/2/2009
Posts: 5,408
Neurons: 87,618
Location: Drain, Oregon, United States
srirr wrote:
While reading an article, this thread quickly popped in my mind.

There is a very common word Postmortem. Just like postpone, we do not have premortem or even mortem-on-time. Brick wall Brick wall

Missed this at the time. Yes, we do use premortem.
Medline Plus / Meriam-Webster Medical dictionary: premortem

It is pretty common in US medical English. (I won't speak for BE speakers.) Ante-mortem had rather fallen by the wayside here. You hear or read it occasionally, but it sounds old-fashioned.
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.