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A man's silence is wonderful to listen to. Options
Daemon
Posted: Monday, October 26, 2015 12:00:00 AM
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A man's silence is wonderful to listen to.

Thomas Hardy (1840-1928)
SoHeiL.N
Posted: Monday, October 26, 2015 12:37:59 AM

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Location: Mashhad, Razavi Khorasan, Iran
A man's silence is wonderful for those who understand, not for those who just listen to the words.
Madas
Posted: Monday, October 26, 2015 12:38:28 AM

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This is what I call genius: to name the thing that was never named before. It is by now coined by Soraya Chemaly, and the word is "mansplaining". Three cheers to Soraya, and to Thomas for being succint, of course.
RoadRunner
Posted: Monday, October 26, 2015 1:00:00 AM

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Mrs. Hardy told him so.
gerry
Posted: Monday, October 26, 2015 1:32:24 AM
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bETTER TO BE SILENT THAN TO SPEAK AND HAVE PEOPLE WISH YOU WERE SILENT
maroo
Posted: Monday, October 26, 2015 2:24:10 AM

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I'm curious why did he think so?
Elsayyed Hassan
Posted: Monday, October 26, 2015 2:57:41 AM

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Thomas Hardy was born June 2, 1840, in the village of Upper Bockhampton, located in Southwestern England. His father was a stone mason and a violinist. His mother enjoyed reading and relating all the folk songs and legends of the region. Between his parents, Hardy gained all the interests that would appear in his novels and his own life: his love for architecture and music, his interest in the lifestyles of the country folk, and his passion for all sorts of literature.

At the age of eight, Hardy began to attend Julia Martin's school in Bockhampton. However, most of his education came from the books he found in Dorchester, the nearby town. He learned French, German, and Latin by teaching himself through these books. At sixteen, Hardy's father apprenticed his son to a local architect, John Hicks. Under Hicks' tutelage, Hardy learned much about architectural drawing and restoring old houses and churches. Hardy loved the apprenticeship because it allowed him to learn the histories of the houses and the families that lived there. Despite his work, Hardy did not forget his academics: in the evenings, Hardy would study with the Greek scholar Horace Moule.

In 1862, Hardy was sent to London to work with the architect Arthur Blomfield. During his five years in London, Hardy immersed himself in the cultural scene by visiting the museums and theaters and studying classic literature. He even began to write his own poetry. Although he did not stay in London, choosing to return to Dorchester as a church restorer, he took his newfound talent for writing to Dorchester as well.
ddaniel
Posted: Monday, October 26, 2015 3:53:36 AM

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Are you talkin' to me?
Joy Frohlich
Posted: Monday, October 26, 2015 4:28:16 AM
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Location: Remagen, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany
Listening to silence? Silence is more than the absence of noise, the word implies calm, at least if one is not wanting to hear something or someone. What I think it crazy is people paying money to buy a record or a CD of silence. To do so & listen through headphones would be a way of avoiding people talking to you.
JMV
Posted: Monday, October 26, 2015 4:44:44 AM

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And this was written by a man?
Why do we have a term for hating women (misogynist), but not for hating men?
Pisogynist perhaps???
They say the perfect couple is a blind wife and a deaf husband. That may be a little closer to the truth.
Bully_rus
Posted: Monday, October 26, 2015 4:55:53 AM
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Location: Minsk, Minskaya Voblasts', Belarus
Especially when it's a pause for thinking. And then it's wonderful to watch too...
CheVegas ☁️ ✈ ☁️
Posted: Monday, October 26, 2015 8:36:33 AM

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My wonderment tends toward reciprocal silence by the other gender.
mudbudda669
Posted: Monday, October 26, 2015 9:33:49 AM

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I've really got to work on this . . .
thar
Posted: Monday, October 26, 2015 10:18:52 AM

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Except

1 it is a misquote
And
2 it is a line by a character.

It is not his philosophy!Brick wall Brick wall

Quote:
"Ay; one o' these up-country London ink-bottle chaps would call Geoffrey a fool."

"Ye never find out what's in that man: never," said Spinks. "Close? ah, he is close! He can hold his tongue well. That man's dumbness is wonderful to listen to."

"There's so much sense in it. Every moment of it is brimmen over wi' sound understanding."

"'A can hold his tongue very clever--very clever truly," echoed Leaf. "'A do look at me as if 'a could see my thoughts running round like the works of a clock."

"Well, all will agree that the man can halt well in his talk, be it a long time or be it a short time. And though we can't expect his daughter to inherit his closeness, she may have a few dribblets from his sense."
Mehrdad77
Posted: Monday, October 26, 2015 2:26:26 PM

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Location: Tehrān, Tehran, Iran
Listen to the sound of silence.
Paul Simon
monamagda
Posted: Monday, October 26, 2015 8:25:32 PM

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Context from :UNDER THE GREENWOOD TREE or THE MELLSTOCK QUIRE A RURAL PAINTING OF THE DUTCH SCHOOL
by Thomas Hardy

CHAPTER V: RETURNING HOME WARD



“Yes; Geoffrey Day is a clever man if ever there was one. Never says anything: not he.”

“Never.”

“You might live wi’ that man, my sonnies, a hundred years, and never know there was anything in him.”

“Ay; one o’ these up-country London ink-bottle chaps would call Geoffrey a fool.”

“Ye never find out what’s in that man: never,” said Spinks. “Close? ah, he is close! He can hold his tongue well. That man’s dumbness is wonderful to listen to.”

“There’s so much sense in it. Every moment of it is brimmen over wi’ sound understanding.”

“’A can hold his tongue very clever—very clever truly,” echoed Leaf. “’A do look at me as if ’a could see my thoughts running round like the works of a clock.”

“Well, all will agree that the man can halt well in his talk, be it a long time or be it a short time. And though we can’t expect his daughter to inherit his closeness, she may have a few dribblets from his sense.”

“And his pocket, perhaps.”

“Yes; the nine hundred pound that everybody says he’s worth; but I call it four hundred and fifty; for I never believe more than half I hear.”

“Well, he’ve made a pound or two, and I suppose the maid will have it, since there’s nobody else. But ’tis rather sharp upon her, if she’s been born to fortune, to bring her up as if not born for it, and letting her work so hard.”

“’Tis all upon his principle. A long-headed feller!”

“Ah,” murmured Spinks, “’twould be sharper upon her if she were born for fortune, and not to it! I suffer from that affliction.”

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/2662/2662-h/2662-h.htm
Virginia Lathan
Posted: Monday, October 26, 2015 8:26:49 PM

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“Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing
and rightdoing there is a field.
I'll meet you there.

When the soul lies down in that grass
the world is too full to talk about.”

― Rumi
Verbatim
Posted: Monday, October 26, 2015 10:08:38 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/3/2012
Posts: 2,240
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Daemon wrote:
A man's silence is wonderful to listen to.

Thomas Hardy (1840-1928)


Provided that the man is holding his own tongue at just the right time. Otherwise the man's silence is nothing to admire.
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