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Drunk as... Options
B355E
Posted: Saturday, January 1, 2011 9:59:36 AM
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...a skunk, because he drinks like a fish. In the spirit of holiday season, how do you drink?
Here, we say "drunk as a Russian" and I heard a rumour that Russians say "drunk as a Finn", is that true?
Babezy
Posted: Saturday, January 1, 2011 10:11:16 AM
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I've also heard "drunk as a lord."
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Saturday, January 1, 2011 10:21:57 AM

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I tend to say: kännissä kuin kumiankka, "drunk like a rubber duck" ;-)

(BTW, Russia is in Top Ten in WHO's alcohol consumption per capita list, Finland is between 20. to 25. The funny thing here is that I've never seen a drunken Luxembourger, nr. 1 in statistics :-)
Wanderer
Posted: Saturday, January 1, 2011 10:57:25 AM

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JJ, I've never seen a drunk Luxembourger either! Around here we have drunk Mexicans. The county just north of me is THE #1 COUNTY IN THE WHOLE US FOR DWI'S! I hear the cops were thick as fleas on dog's back last night.
islanddreamer
Posted: Saturday, January 1, 2011 4:03:51 PM
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Unfortunately,or fortunately, as I get older I seem to not be able to drink as much as when I was younger. A beer or two or a few glasses of wine seems to be my limit. My daughter has dubbed me "a two beer queer".
blahblah
Posted: Saturday, January 1, 2011 4:12:17 PM
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The French say, "Je suis fait comme un rat."

Literally, "I'm done like a rat," but it means "I'm drunk."

A similar colloquial BE expression is, "I'm completely rat-arsed."

How about hangover terms?

French again: it's called "la gueule de bois," literally a wooden mouth.

I did some research on this a couple of years ago (don't ask!) and came up with the following.
It would be great to hear if these expressions are really used - and to learn some new terms.

America: Hangie.
Australia: Zacklies or egg zacklies (your mouth tastes exactly like your butt).
Australia: Brown bottle flu.
China: Drunk overnight.
Denmark: Carpenters hammering in my head.
Egypt: Still drunk.
France: Ill in the hair (or a hair-ache) or I have a wooden mouth.
Germany: The wailing of cats or a tomcat.
Holland: A tomcat.
Ireland: Ta dha cinn orm, Gaelic for “There are two heads on me.”
Ireland: Hangin’ or in ribbons or in bits. “I’m like Lego this morning – in bits.”
Italy: Out of tune.
Japan: Two days drunk.
Mexico: La cruda
Poland: The howling of kittens
Portugal: That choppy feeling after a night of Port.
Salvador: To wake up “made of rubber.”
Spain: A nail in the head.
Spanish: La resaca, which also means undertow in the ocean.
Sweden: Pain in the root of my hairs.
I’m smacked from behind
Slovakia: To have a monkey.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Saturday, January 1, 2011 6:02:25 PM

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Hangover in Finnish: krapula, kohmelo, kankkunen, kanuuna, jysäri, krabbis or darra.
Or "Kuka on syönyt kissanpaskaa mun suulla?" (Who's been eating cat shit with my mouth?)

An interesting aspect on this matter can be found in Discworld & Pratchett Wiki

Bilious

The Oh God of Hangovers. His believers, if they can be called as such, are the people who wake up after a night's drinking and moan "oh god...", as they suffer from a hangover. Bilious continuously suffers from severe hangover, with headache, nausea, vision problems, fainting, and more. He looks like a young man with the classical toga, but his toga is colorful with bits of things that have come up out of him that he has not eaten or drunk the night before. Although hangovers are common, he is relatively minor among the Discworld gods. He hates people who drink a lot and never have a hangover because the hangover they're supposed to have goes to Bilious instead. He also hates people who drink. He hates most the god of wine, Bibulous, who is probably not even aware of Bilious's existence and is quite probably the main contributor to Bilious's hangovers since Bibulous always drinks and never has a hangover. (From Hogfather)
GeorgeV
Posted: Saturday, January 1, 2011 6:54:30 PM
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I hope future collections of palindromes will contain this freshly coined effort:

Drunk as a knurd.
blahblah
Posted: Saturday, January 1, 2011 7:38:46 PM
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GeorgeV, this is surely a forum where it's safe to be a word nerd.
If you don't like this particular form of nerdiness, there are plenty of other forums you join..
one discussing regal pretensions, perhaps?


Jyrkkä Jätkä, what do these words mean?

"krapula, kohmelo, kankkunen, kanuuna, jysäri, krabbis or darra."
bethm
Posted: Saturday, January 1, 2011 8:47:41 PM
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I must confess I love this thread, especially JJ's.
Perfect!

Jyrkkä Jätkä wrote:
"Kuka on syönyt kissanpaskaa mun suulla?" (Who's been eating cat shit with my mouth?)
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Saturday, January 1, 2011 8:49:15 PM

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[blahblah wrote:]
GeorgeV, this is surely a forum where it's safe to be a word nerd.
If you don't like this particular form of nerdiness, there are plenty of other forums you join..
one discussing regal pretensions, perhaps?


Jyrkkä Jätkä, what do these words mean?

"krapula, kohmelo, kankkunen, kanuuna, jysäri, krabbis or darra."


I wonder if you misinterpreted George's wordplay somehow?

Anyhow, those words all mean hangover and quite difficult to translate literally but,

krapula - from Latin crapula (means both drunkenness and hangover)
kohmelo - from Russian похмелье, pohmelʹe (after the drunkenness)
kankkunen, kanuuna - from cannon (kaboom in head!)
jysäri - (BIG kaboom in head!)
krabbis - from krapula, Stadin slangia (Helsinki slang word)
darra - from Swedish darra (shaking) or dagen efter (the day after), Stadin slangia
blahblah
Posted: Saturday, January 1, 2011 9:32:21 PM
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Jyrkkä Jätkä wrote:

I wonder if you misinterpreted George's wordplay somehow?

I hope so, JJ.
HWNN1961
Posted: Saturday, January 1, 2011 10:21:45 PM
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Hmmm,

I think most of the best expressions have been mentioned, but, a couple:

Archaic: "he's in his cups"

Three sheets to the wind,

Feeling no pain

s@@t-faced

pickled

well-lubricated

plastered

shnoggered

off the wagon

plowed

blind-a@@ drunk

got his beer muscles goin' on

obliterated

kranked

smashed

bent

drunk as a bishop

all liquored up



There is a rough correlation between the number of words a culture has for a thing or a state of being and the pervasiveness of that thing.

Anyway, last night, I had several glasses of champagne and a couple brandys for the new year, so, I wasn't lit-up like a christmas tree, but I certainly had a good buzz going on.

On a related topic, Pat Robertson says that people should not be sent to jail for puffing on a marijuana cigarette. Wow, there is hope after all!
bethm
Posted: Saturday, January 1, 2011 11:11:37 PM
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Thanks for the memories, HWNN!

I am moved to share one of my favorite poems.


Ballade of Soporific Absorption
By J.C.Squire

Ho! Ho! Yes! Yes! It's very all well,
You may drunk I am think, but I tell you I'm not,
I'm as sound as a fiddle and fit as a bell,
And stable quite ill to see what's what.
I under do stand you surprise a got
When I headed my smear with gooseberry jam;
And I've swallowed, I grant, a beer of lot -
But I'm not so think as you drunk I am.

Can I liquor my stand? Why, yes, like hell!
I care not how many a tossed I've pot,
I shall stralk quite weight and not yutter an ell,
My feech will not spalter the least little jot:
If you knownly had own! - well, I gave him a dot,
And I said to him, 'Sergeant, I'll come like a lamb -
The floor it seems like a storm in a yacht,
But I'm not so think as you drunk I am.

For example, to prove it I'll tale you a tell -
I once knew a fellow named Apricot -
I'm sorry, I just chair over a fell -
A trifle - this chap, on a very day hot -
If I hadn't consumed that last whisky of tot! -
As I said now, this fellow, called Abraham -
Ah? One more? Since it's you! Just a do me will spot -
But I'm not so think as you drunk I am.

Envoi

So, Prince, you suggest I've bolted my shot?
Well, like what you say, and soul your damn!
I'm an upple litset by the talk you rot -
But I'm not so think as you drunk I am.

GeorgeV
Posted: Saturday, January 1, 2011 11:39:39 PM
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Jyrkkä Jätkä wrote:

kohmelo - from Russian похмелье, pohmelʹe (after the drunkenness)


In which one finds хмель - hops. So ultimately, humo(o)rously, literally: afterhopsiness.
http://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D0%A5%D0%BC%D0%B5%D0%BB%D1%8C (picture of hops)
bethm
Posted: Sunday, January 2, 2011 1:34:15 PM
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I just remembered one my parents' generation used:

One over the eight.

Anybody know where that comes from?
doctorarcane
Posted: Sunday, January 2, 2011 1:37:11 PM
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knee walkin' drunk // from the midwest usa
excaelis
Posted: Sunday, January 2, 2011 2:59:18 PM

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Brahms and Liszt, a little bit Mozart, treed, bladdered, squiffy, tired and emotional....

A brief exchange between a judge and defence counsel :

" My client was incapable of forming the requisite intent as he was drunk as a judge at the time of the incident."
" I believe the phrase is correctly ' Drunk as a lord ', Mr. Stevens."
" As your Lordship pleases..."
tootsie
Posted: Sunday, January 2, 2011 4:05:33 PM

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bethm wrote:
I just remembered one my parents' generation used:

One over the eight.

Anybody know where that comes from?


nope, always thought it was 'one over the nine', so guess I had 'one for the road' or maybe 'one too many'

'Three Sheets to the Wind' bing a rell ?? teehee

Happy New Year...........zzzzzzzzzzz....hic.......
Cat
Posted: Sunday, January 2, 2011 5:07:20 PM

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A gennleman is never drunk, he is foxed. ;))
musicwriter
Posted: Monday, January 3, 2011 12:02:17 AM
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bombed, plowed under, inebriated, intoxicated, crocked, shellacked, loaded to the gills, soused, wasted.
Alex Van den Daele
Posted: Monday, January 3, 2011 2:32:47 AM

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In Ghent (Belgium, East Flanders) we use the expression: as drunk as a canon ("zuu zat of een kanoeng"), as drunk as a Swiss ("zuu zat gelèk ne Zwitser"). Also: "poepeloerezat"
Chrystall
Posted: Monday, January 3, 2011 3:58:21 AM
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In South Africa we say: I'm sloshed!!!
So much about drinking and getting drunk - goodness gracious!!! Why lose our head over a silly liquid and allow it to rule our judgement and actions???
intelfam
Posted: Monday, January 3, 2011 5:49:45 AM
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What happened to "p...sed as a f..t"?
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Monday, January 3, 2011 6:36:05 AM

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Kännissä kuin käki = drunk like a cuckoo (google translation gives "as tight as a tick")
Soseet solmussa = purees on knots
Umpihumalassa = solid drunk, legless
Adriaticus
Posted: Monday, January 3, 2011 10:06:56 AM
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intelfam wrote:
What happened to "p...sed as a f..t"?


yep, I was about to mention that. I've always heard "pissed" as a common word for being drunk in UK. But since my friends aren't lord I suspect it's not exactly a polite form Sick

In italian we have many different ways to described that:

I'm bombed,devastated,drunk like a monkey,to have a monkey on your back,charged,full,bent,etc
intelfam
Posted: Tuesday, January 4, 2011 9:46:20 AM
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Yes Adriaticus, it is somewhat rude and thus gives rise to the rhyming slang version "I'm a bit Brahms", shortened from "Brahms and Liszt" = pi..ed!
Arfax
Posted: Tuesday, January 4, 2011 10:24:30 AM
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blahblah wrote:
The French say, "Je suis fait comme un rat."

Literally, "I'm done like a rat," but it means "I'm drunk."

(...)

French again: it's called "la gueule de bois," literally a wooden mouth.



Think Hmm... I'm afraid "fait comme un rat" means you are trapped, with no possibility of escape.

When you are drunk, you may be just "fait" (no rat here), plein / bourré (full) or "plein comme une barrique" (full as a barrel) ; "rond comme une queue de pelle" (round as a spade handle's butt), "en tenir une bonne" (to have a good one), "avoir des chaussures à bascule" (to wear rocking shoes).

Then, in the aftermath of drinking, you will indeed have a good headache, hence "avoir la gueule de bois" or "Avoir les cheveux qui poussent à l'intérieur" (your hair is growing inwards) or "avoir un casque à boulons" (to wear a helmet with bolts).

Cheers !

TYSON
Posted: Tuesday, January 4, 2011 7:05:12 PM
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PISSED AS A NEWT
Tovarish
Posted: Tuesday, January 4, 2011 7:25:28 PM
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Three sheets to the wind.

Above the plimsoll line

A tiny tipple too many

I got 'butchers hook' 'cos I was 'Brahms & Liszt'

Wobbly boot

Egg-zackly!!!
bturpin
Posted: Tuesday, January 4, 2011 8:01:13 PM
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FUBAR - F**ked Up Beyond All Recognition
excaelis
Posted: Tuesday, January 4, 2011 8:32:15 PM

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MOAFU - The Mother Of All F***ed Up.
Tovarish
Posted: Tuesday, January 4, 2011 10:03:06 PM
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Wow, some of you must really get 'Sh-t faced", ha ha
Alias
Posted: Tuesday, January 4, 2011 10:25:10 PM
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Sorry I was a little slow on getting on to this post...
I was totally Krapula (what a great word!!!!) last night and I slept in cos I was chundering i.e. driving the porcelain bus all morning.

Ok you guys have taken most of the good terms for being drunk but I reckon I have a few that havent been mentioned yet

Totalled,
paralytic
legless
under the weather
plastered
stoned
stonkered
tanked
tight
intemperate
pished

and my personal favourite...Maggotted!

In my misspent youth (just prior to my misspent adulthood!!) I was still sixteen* and working as a ceiling and wall plasterer. After a particularly "wet" works Christmas party I went out for a kebab with my workmate and ended up "rat arsed" face down in my best suit in the central square of Adelaide City. The Police picked me up (literally) charged me with public drunkennes, and drinking under age.

I spent the night in a police watch-house cell on a wooden plank bed with wee-soaked blankets.(inherited from the incontinent drunk that preceded me) I woke up around 5am feeling seedy and somewhat second hand.

When I returned for my court appearance I was very apprehensive as underage drinking I was told could be serious.


My mum sat in the court room (bless her cotton socks) and I stood in the dock in my freshly drycleaned suit, looking very contrite, with my best "I will never do it again your honour" look on my furrowed brow.

The magistrate came in, we all rose and I had to resist the urge not to bow!! (laughs)
He sat and pondered the charge sheet details accepted the guilty plea and paused to pronounce the verdict. I stood with my heart in my mouth.

The magistrate looked up ponderously (as only judges know how) looked over his glasses and said:

"It looks like its a case of the plasterer getting plastered!"

To which the small group of people in the court, my legal aid lawyer, the police prosecutor, the stenographer, the clerk, my mum and I burst out laughing.

He then proceeded to give me a small fine, no recorded conviction, and set me free. As you can imagine I was greatly relieved and I offered to take my mum to the Litigators Arms Hotel across the road from the court for a celebratory Guiness and a medium dry sherry for her.

She clipped me under the ear and flagged down the approaching bus.


* Drinking age in South Australia has been 18yo since the 1970s when Australia had national service for 18 yo for the Vietnam War. It was reasoned that if we could send our 18 yo kids to die in the jungles of Vietnam to support US foreign policy goals then the least we could do is allow them to get pissed before they embarked.



QUOTE of the day* "Work is the curse of the drinking class"
Alias
Posted: Tuesday, January 4, 2011 10:28:56 PM
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BTW Tov In my rhymimg slang dictionary A butchers hook is rhyming slang for take a look. ( My dad was a butcher)
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