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I Love Lucy Premieres (1951) Options
Daemon
Posted: Thursday, October 15, 2015 12:00:00 AM
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I Love Lucy Premieres (1951)

In 1951, Lucille Ball became one of the first movie stars—and the first woman—to headline a television series. The prototypical situation comedy, I Love Lucy became a spectacular success, showcasing Ball's comic energy, flair for slapstick, and chemistry with her co-star and real-life husband, Desi Arnaz, as they portrayed the zany middle-class couple Lucy and Ricky Ricardo. The program is still syndicated today. What word was once prohibited from being used on I Love Lucy? More...
Elsayyed Hassan
Posted: Thursday, October 15, 2015 8:12:58 AM

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I Love Lucy is an American television sitcom starring Lucille Ball, Desi Arnaz, Vivian Vance, and William Frawley. The black-and-white series originally ran from October 15, 1951, to May 6, 1957, on CBS. After the series ended in 1957, however, a modified version continued for three more seasons with 13 one-hour specials, running from 1957 to 1960, known first as The Lucille Ball-Desi Arnaz Show and later in reruns as The Lucy–Desi Comedy Hour.

The show, which was the first scripted television program to be shot on 35 mm film in front of a studio audience, won five Emmy Awards and received numerous nominations. Another award that the show won was the coveted Peabody Award for "recognition of distinguished achievement in television."[2]

I Love Lucy was the most watched show in the United States in four of its six seasons, and was the first to end its run at the top of the Nielsen ratings (an accomplishment later matched only by The Andy Griffith Show in 1968 and Seinfeld in 1998) . The show is still syndicated in dozens of languages across the world, and remains popular, with an American audience of 40 million each year.[3] A colorized version of its Christmas episode attracted more than eight million viewers when CBS aired it in prime time in 2013 – 62 years after the show premiered.[4] A second colorized special, featuring the "L.A. At Last!" and "Lucy and Superman" episodes, aired on May 17, 2015, attracting 6.4 million viewers.[5]

I Love Lucy is often regarded as one of the greatest and most influential sitcoms in history. In 2012, it was voted the 'Best TV Show of All Time' in a survey conducted by ABC News and People Magazine.[6]
pedro
Posted: Thursday, October 15, 2015 8:34:31 AM
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It used to baffle me as a child.
Gary98
Posted: Thursday, October 15, 2015 9:55:09 AM

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Missed their mountain climbing in the Alps episodes. That girl is funny
Wanderer
Posted: Thursday, October 15, 2015 11:38:18 AM

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The word that was verboten was pregnant. In those days polite people said expecting not, that pg word. I grew up knowing married women were expecting and women of no virtue were pregnant.
Gary98
Posted: Thursday, October 15, 2015 2:36:53 PM

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Wanderer wrote:
The word that was verboten was pregnant. In those days polite people said expecting not, that pg word. I grew up knowing married women were expecting and women of no virtue were pregnant.


Sure, something to show that we are better than many others. We are exceptional!
monamagda
Posted: Thursday, October 15, 2015 7:08:26 PM

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Controversies in I Love Lucy

While a show such as I Love Lucy may not seem like the most controversial subject in the world, and yet during the 50s and 60s it changed the boundaries of what was shown on television. At the time, there were no bi-cultural, or bi-racial families on television (See Censorship), but this changed when Desi Arnez and Lucille Ball lived together on stage (and most notably off stage as well). While this may not seem like an ice-breaking idea, at the time this was revolutionary, and drastically changed the limits. Nowadays, in shows like Modern Family for example, this is a common occurance. Another controversial image broadcast over television was a man and woman sleeping together in the "same bed".
No previous couple on television was ever shown like this, even if it obliviously happened in almost every family off screen. The network only allowed this for two reasons, one being that Arnez and Ball were both married off stage, and that their bed was in actuality two twin sized beds pushed together. The most controversial topic by far, however, was Lucy's pregnancy, and the couple's decision to make it a key plot point in the show. While this did give their show a big boost in ratings, and viewers, it gave the network a headache trying to make this idea "safe for viewers". The cast of the show could not say the word "pregnant" or "pregnancy" on the air, but could instead use the word "expecting." The episode in which the pregnancy was announced was entitled "Lucy is Enceinte", (the French word for pregnant). The episode in which the baby is born is entitled "Lucy visits the Hospital"


Read more : https://sites.google.com/site/50sand60stelevision/quiz-shows
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