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When men exercise their reason coolly and freely on a variety of distinct questions, they inevitably fall into different... Options
Daemon
Posted: Tuesday, September 29, 2015 12:00:00 AM
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When men exercise their reason coolly and freely on a variety of distinct questions, they inevitably fall into different opinions on some of them. When they are governed by a common passion, their opinions, if they are so to be called, will be the same.

Alexander Hamilton (1755-1804)
sandeep patra
Posted: Tuesday, September 29, 2015 1:18:45 AM

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Decisions are usually inflenced due various reasons as well by various persons....the latter needed to be considered a bit carefully and wisely
Bully_rus
Posted: Tuesday, September 29, 2015 4:29:39 AM
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To have a different opinion (your own thought) is not for the faint-hearted...
mudbudda669
Posted: Tuesday, September 29, 2015 9:43:58 AM

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Word
Elsayyed Hassan
Posted: Tuesday, September 29, 2015 10:39:03 AM

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Alexander Hamilton (January 11, 1755 or 1757 – July 12, 1804) was a founding father of the United States, chief staff aide to General George Washington, one of the most influential interpreters and promoters of the U.S. Constitution, the founder of the nation's financial system, the founder of the Federalist Party, the world's first voter-based political party, and the Father of the United States Coast Guard. As the first Secretary of the Treasury, Hamilton was the primary author of the economic policies of the George Washington administration. Hamilton took the lead in the funding of the states' debts by the Federal government, the establishment of a national bank, a system of tariffs, and friendly trade relations with Britain. He led the Federalist Party, created largely in support of his views; he was opposed by the Democratic-Republican Party, led by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison, which despised Britain and feared that Hamilton's policies of a strong central government would weaken the American commitment to Republicanism.

Born out of wedlock, raised in the West Indies, and orphaned as a child, Hamilton pursued a college education through the help of local wealthy men. Recognized for his abilities and talent, he was sent to King's College (now Columbia University), in New York City. Hamilton played a major role in the American Revolutionary War. At the start of the war in 1775, he organized an artillery company. He soon became the senior aide to General Washington, the American forces' commander-in-chief. Washington sent him on numerous important missions to tell generals what Washington wanted. After the war, Hamilton was elected to the Congress of the Confederation from New York. He resigned, to practice law, and founded the Bank of New York. Hamilton was among those dissatisfied with the weak national government. He led the Annapolis Convention, which successfully influenced Congress to issue a call for the Philadelphia Convention, in order to create a new constitution. He was an active participant at Philadelphia; and he helped achieve ratification by writing 51 of the 85 installments of The Federalist Papers. To this day, it is the single most important reference for Constitutional interpretation.[1]

Hamilton became the leading cabinet member in the new government under President Washington. Hamilton was a nationalist, who emphasized strong central government and successfully argued that the implied powers of the Constitution provided the legal authority to fund the national debt, assume states' debts, and create the government-owned Bank of the United States. These programs were funded primarily by a tariff on imports, and later also by a highly controversial tax on whiskey. Facing well-organized opposition from Jefferson and Madison, Hamilton mobilized a nationwide network of friends of the government, especially bankers and businessmen. It became the Federalist Party. A major issue splitting the parties was the Jay Treaty, largely designed by Hamilton in 1794. It established friendly economic relations with Britain to the chagrin of France and the supporters of the French Revolution. Hamilton played a central role in the Federalist party, which dominated national and state politics until it lost the election of 1800 to Jefferson's Democratic Republicans.
monamagda
Posted: Tuesday, September 29, 2015 1:35:42 PM

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Context from : THE FEDERALIST PAPERS No. L:
Periodical Appeals to the People Considered From the New York Packet.
Date: Tuesday, February 5, 1788.
MADISON


Third. Every page of their proceedings witnesses the effect of all these circumstances on the temper of their deliberations. Throughout the continuance of the council, it was split into two fixed and violent parties. The fact is acknowledged and lamented by themselves. Had this not been the case, the face of their proceedings exhibits a proof equally satisfactory. In all questions, however unimportant in themselves, or unconnected with each other, the same names stand invariably contrasted on the opposite columns. Every unbiased observer may infer, without danger of mistake, and at the same time without meaning to reflect on either party, or any individuals of either party, that, unfortunately, PASSION, not REASON, must have presided over their decisions. When men exercise their reason coolly and freely on a variety of distinct questions, they inevitably fall into different opinions on some of them. When they are governed by a common passion, their opinions, if they are so to be called, will be the same.

http://xroads.virginia.edu/~hyper/FEDERAL/ch50.html
Verbatim
Posted: Tuesday, September 29, 2015 2:00:26 PM
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Daemon wrote:
When men exercise their reason coolly and freely on a variety of distinct questions, they inevitably fall into different opinions on some of them. When they are governed by a common passion, their opinions, if they are so to be called, will be the same.

Alexander Hamilton (1755-1804)


The Federalist No. 50 was an essay by James Madison, actually, not Hamilton: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Federalist_No._50

It should give us food for thought regarding the evolution of partisanship in politics, and its preponderance in forming political opinions.
Ricardo Zúñiga
Posted: Tuesday, September 29, 2015 6:00:56 PM

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How to know when the opinion of a person is being affected by a passion and not a reason?
Verbatim
Posted: Tuesday, September 29, 2015 10:04:33 PM
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Passion is what ideology demands of those who subscribe to it. Reason is what ideology will not allow passion to stand for.
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