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Men cling to life even at the cost of enduring great misfortune. Options
Daemon
Posted: Monday, September 28, 2015 12:00:00 AM
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Men cling to life even at the cost of enduring great misfortune.

Aristotle (384 BC-322 BC)
RoadRunner
Posted: Monday, September 28, 2015 12:40:01 AM

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Sounds epic, but actually there is no other choice. Anxious
Nisar Akhtar
Posted: Monday, September 28, 2015 3:30:55 AM

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Life is precious and it must be honoured.
pedro
Posted: Monday, September 28, 2015 3:36:39 AM
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You only live once. You only die once.
JMV
Posted: Monday, September 28, 2015 5:27:36 AM

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Men cling to life even at the cost of enduring great misfortune.
- Aristotle (384 BC-322 BC)

Well, yeah . . . it kinda beats being dead.

This appears not to be one of Aristotle's more profound conclusions (taken out of context).
monamagda
Posted: Monday, September 28, 2015 7:10:55 AM

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Context from : Politics By Aristotle Written 350 B.C.E Translated by Benjamin Jowett

Book Three

"Man is by nature a political animal. And therefore, men, even when they do not require one another’s help, desire to live together; not but that they are also brought together by their common interests in proportion as they severally attain to any measure of well-being. This is certainly the chief end, both of individuals and of states. And also for the sake of mere life (in which there is possibly some noble element so long as the evils of existence do not greatly overbalance the good) mankind meet together and maintain the political community.And we all see that men cling to life even at the cost of enduring great misfortune, seeming to find in life a natural sweetness and happiness."

http://classics.mit.edu/Aristotle/politics.3.three.html
Bully_rus
Posted: Monday, September 28, 2015 10:18:44 AM
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Daemon wrote:
Men cling to life even at the cost of enduring great misfortune.

Aristotle (384 BC-322 BC)


It is either enduring hope or the same self-deception...
Elsayyed Hassan
Posted: Monday, September 28, 2015 10:19:20 AM

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Aristotle (/ˈærɪˌstɒtəl/;[1] Greek: Ἀριστοτέλης [aristotélɛːs], Aristotélēs; 384 – 322 BC)[2] was a Greek philosopher and scientist born in the Macedonian city of Stagira, Chalkidice, on the northern periphery of Classical Greece. His father, Nicomachus, died when Aristotle was a child, whereafter Proxenus of Atarneus became his guardian.[3] At eighteen, he joined Plato's Academy in Athens and remained there until the age of thirty-seven (c. 347 BC). His writings cover many subjects – including physics, biology, zoology, metaphysics, logic, ethics, aesthetics, poetry, theater, music, rhetoric, linguistics, politics and government – and constitute the first comprehensive system of Western philosophy. Shortly after Plato died, Aristotle left Athens and, at the request of Philip of Macedon, tutored Alexander the Great starting from 343 BC.[4] According to the Encyclopædia Britannica, "Aristotle was the first genuine scientist in history ... [and] every scientist is in his debt."[5]

Teaching Alexander the Great gave Aristotle many opportunities and an abundance of supplies. He established a library in the Lyceum which aided in the production of many of his hundreds of books. The fact that Aristotle was a pupil of Plato contributed to his former views of Platonism, but, following Plato's death, Aristotle immersed himself in empirical studies and shifted from Platonism to empiricism.[6] He believed all peoples' concepts and all of their knowledge was ultimately based on perception. Aristotle's views on natural sciences represent the groundwork underlying many of his works.

Aristotle's views on physical science profoundly shaped medieval scholarship. Their influence extended into the Renaissance and were not replaced systematically until the Enlightenment and theories such as classical mechanics. Some of Aristotle's zoological observations, such as on the hectocotyl (reproductive) arm of the octopus, were not confirmed or refuted until the 19th century. His works contain the earliest known formal study of logic, which was incorporated in the late 19th century into modern formal logic.

In metaphysics, Aristotelianism profoundly influenced Judeo-Islamic philosophical and theological thought during the Middle Ages and continues to influence Christian theology, especially the scholastic tradition of the Catholic Church. Aristotle was well known among medieval Muslim intellectuals and revered as "The First Teacher" (Arabic: المعلم الأول‎).

His ethics, though always influential, gained renewed interest with the modern advent of virtue ethics. All aspects of Aristotle's philosophy continue to be the object of active academic study today. Though Aristotle wrote many elegant treatises and dialogues – Cicero described his literary style as "a river of gold"[7] – it is thought that only around a third of his original output has survived.[8
MelissaMe
Posted: Monday, September 28, 2015 10:53:29 AM

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[Bold]And we all see that men cling to life even at the cost of enduring great misfortune, seeming to find in life a natural sweetness and happiness."[/Bold]

It really does make 100% more sense in context! Thank you, monamagda. Applause

Obviously the greater misfortune is death!
Mehrdad77
Posted: Monday, September 28, 2015 11:43:51 AM

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The worst sorrows in life are not in its losses and misfortunes, but its fears.
Mehrdad77
Posted: Monday, September 28, 2015 11:45:07 AM

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My life has been full of terrible misfortunes most of which never happened.
Michel de Montaigne
Vitaly Ozolinsh
Posted: Monday, September 28, 2015 1:22:05 PM

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Such people like Aristotle live forever.
Verbatim
Posted: Monday, September 28, 2015 2:56:43 PM
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"And also for the sake of mere life (in which there is possibly some noble element so long as the evils of existence do not greatly overbalance the good) mankind meet together and maintain the political community." Aristotle

So long as it is understood that "my" life comes before "your" life mankind meet together and maintain the political community,
possibly some noble element of mere life notwithstanding. Not talking
gerry
Posted: Monday, September 28, 2015 3:39:04 PM
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Life is so dear that one is willing to die for it
SkyCui
Posted: Monday, September 28, 2015 9:50:44 PM
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I am a Chinese guy, and I come to this place to learn English, men cling to life even at the cost of enduring great misfortune.
Verbatim
Posted: Wednesday, September 30, 2015 5:10:23 PM
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Daemon wrote:
Men cling to life even at the cost of enduring great misfortune.

Aristotle (384 BC-322 BC)


Seldom do men know that in advance, and even if they had known what had to be endured by clinging to life,
the alternative would have left them in the dark for a choice.
Jaume
Posted: Thursday, October 1, 2015 3:54:41 PM

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indeed,men cling to life even at the cost of enduring misfortune because they dont know what will befalls them even if they want to escape misfortune to fortune.
Verbatim
Posted: Saturday, October 3, 2015 1:58:00 AM
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Between clinging to life and its converse, embracing death, there must be a few gradations of lesser cost than "great misfortune", perhaps some of distinct benefit.
Men will gamble on the unknown outcome.
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