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Small daily aspirin dose 'cuts cancer risk' Options
pedro
Posted: Tuesday, December 7, 2010 4:32:01 AM
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Joined: 5/21/2009
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Does anybody know how this is supposed to work?
Luftmarque
Posted: Tuesday, December 7, 2010 5:25:51 AM

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Joined: 3/17/2009
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Location: Pau, Aquitaine, France
I don't think anybody does, yet.
pedro
Posted: Tuesday, December 7, 2010 5:29:57 AM
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Joined: 5/21/2009
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Neurons: 63,022
does that put it in the Prozac/frontal lobotomy category I wonder?
Tman
Posted: Tuesday, December 7, 2010 6:39:02 AM
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From what I read a month or so ago, the results were only observational at this time. However, it was interesting that the observations resulted in reduction of risk over several areas of the body.
MarySM
Posted: Tuesday, December 7, 2010 7:22:30 AM
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Joined: 11/22/2009
Posts: 1,627
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I hope that this is found to be true as I have faithfully taken an 81mg aspirin every day for the past six years. Right now it is probably just a hypothesis.

“A fact is a simple statement that everyone believes. It is innocent, unless found guilty. A hypothesis is a novel suggestion that no one wants to believe. It is guilty, until found effective.” Edward Teller
richsap
Posted: Tuesday, December 7, 2010 8:23:19 AM
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Joined: 7/16/2010
Posts: 275
Neurons: 1,510
I have done my own research and have found that a good greasy cheeseburger once or twice a week keeps cancer at bay. How do I know? Well, I'm 50 y/o and don't have cancer, so the proof is in the pudding.

Keep in mind that the medical industry, particularly the research arm, is a self-supporting entity. If they didn't do constant research of some sort or another they (researchers) would be thrown into the real working world of actually producing tangible products instead of white papers. Not that all research is null and void, but allow me to step up on the soapbox for just a moment...

The human body has a finite life span. We make choices throughout our life, some good and some bad. If you choose to overeat and clog your arteries, your life will likely be cut short. It's called survival of the fittest. What medical science has done is to allow us to exceed our usable (productive) life span. So now we, as a society, get to support those that can not support themselves. Used to be the weak and elderly fell behind the herd and became a part of the food chain. Now we carry them with us and the net effect is that society as a whole shoulders the burden. Higher medical costs and all that goes along with it.

Before you flame me, let me say that I am very lucky that my parents are living, and that they are living due to the same medical advances that I hold in contempt. They both worked until they earned the right to retire, putting 40+ years of productivity behind them. And yes, I am grateful that they are alive (and active, if not productive) and able to be a part of their grandchildren's lives. Had it not been for medical research I myself would likely not be writing this diatribe today. Quite the paradox, eh?

So, Dear Reader, you have medical science to blame for having to put up with my post! Anxious

What about you? Should we live forever or let nature take its course? At what point do we, as a society, say 'enough is enough' and accept that we can't or shouldn't live forever? Food for thought (with an aspirin on the side).
MarySM
Posted: Tuesday, December 7, 2010 8:38:03 AM
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Joined: 11/22/2009
Posts: 1,627
Neurons: 6,084
As Dave Barry said it his book, I want to "stay fit and healthy until I'm dead."
Rhondish
Posted: Tuesday, December 7, 2010 8:40:20 AM
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Joined: 3/20/2009
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Location: NH - United States
Who released the study?

An aspirin manufacturer no doubt.
Joseph Glantz
Posted: Tuesday, December 7, 2010 9:03:55 AM
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Joined: 3/18/2009
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Location: United States
I hope it has merit.
Kami
Posted: Tuesday, December 7, 2010 10:23:42 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/12/2009
Posts: 229
Neurons: 687
richsap wrote:
I have done my own research and have found that a good greasy cheeseburger once or twice a week keeps cancer at bay. How do I know? Well, I'm 50 y/o and don't have cancer, so the proof is in the pudding.

Keep in mind that the medical industry, particularly the research arm, is a self-supporting entity. If they didn't do constant research of some sort or another they (researchers) would be thrown into the real working world of actually producing tangible products instead of white papers. Not that all research is null and void, but allow me to step up on the soapbox for just a moment...

The human body has a finite life span. We make choices throughout our life, some good and some bad. If you choose to overeat and clog your arteries, your life will likely be cut short. It's called survival of the fittest. What medical science has done is to allow us to exceed our usable (productive) life span. So now we, as a society, get to support those that can not support themselves. Used to be the weak and elderly fell behind the herd and became a part of the food chain. Now we carry them with us and the net effect is that society as a whole shoulders the burden. Higher medical costs and all that goes along with it.

Before you flame me, let me say that I am very lucky that my parents are living, and that they are living due to the same medical advances that I hold in contempt. They both worked until they earned the right to retire, putting 40+ years of productivity behind them. And yes, I am grateful that they are alive (and active, if not productive) and able to be a part of their grandchildren's lives. Had it not been for medical research I myself would likely not be writing this diatribe today. Quite the paradox, eh?

So, Dear Reader, you have medical science to blame for having to put up with my post! Anxious

What about you? Should we live forever or let nature take its course? At what point do we, as a society, say 'enough is enough' and accept that we can't or shouldn't live forever? Food for thought (with an aspirin on the side).


I don't think anybody is afraid of death and medical science doesn't treat death. We're only scared of the pain from an illness, which is basically the concern of medical science. But since it's the illness that causes the pain, medical science focuses on the causes to get rid of the effects (pain), and so don't get them wrong.
richsap
Posted: Tuesday, December 7, 2010 1:34:14 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/16/2010
Posts: 275
Neurons: 1,510
"I don't think anybody is afraid of death and medical science doesn't treat death. We're only scared of the pain from an illness, which is basically the concern of medical science. But since it's the illness that causes the pain, medical science focuses on the causes to get rid of the effects (pain), and so don't get them wrong."

Can't disagree with that statement at all. But there is a difference between relieving pain from cancer and treating someone with radiation and chemotherapy are night and day. One is treating the symptoms and the other is treating the disease.

I guess my objection to the ever-increasing life span through the miracle of modern science is quality of life. I personally don't want to be alive if I can't live, i.e. be a functional member of society. Functional not meaning that I have to work and produce tangible goods, but that I can care for myself and be of sound mind. Barring that, what is the sense in being 100 years old if you are confined to a bed and fed and bathed by others. I don't want to be a burden.
Cass
Posted: Tuesday, December 7, 2010 9:22:29 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 12/19/2009
Posts: 589
Neurons: 1,770
Location: United States
Well, Rich, if it happens to you perhaps you could have a buxom blonde nurse like Gaddafi has!

There's been a lot of speculation about how inflammation in the body causes cell changes and other nasty processes, so perhaps they're looking at aspirin as a way to prevent cell changes from inflammation. Interesting subject. Is it still true that we don't know how aspirin even works? As to living longer and longer I was reading an article recently that hypothesized that we could live as much as 120 years or more. Can't for the life of me remember where I read it so I can't offer a link to go to. The article stated that all body parts could be replaced when they wore out with synthetic and/or robotic parts. Talk about your Daleks!
kingfisher
Posted: Tuesday, January 4, 2011 1:14:46 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 12/15/2009
Posts: 208
Neurons: 633
Location: United States
richsap wrote:


What about you? Should we live forever or let nature take its course? ...


I think most people are opting for something somewhere between those two extremes. If we just "let nature take its course" we wouldn't treat infants and children with meningitis; they would die. And yet we can relatively easily cure the disease process and provide them with many more years of productive life.

The difficulty lies in figuring out where to draw the line. And while it's relatively easy to make sweeping generalizations about what "should" be done, when the time comes to make the actual decision for one individual (rather than for a collective) it is universally a much harder process. Most people are OK with letting somebody else's grandmother die, but want their own grandmother to be saved. Problem is that every grandmother is somebody's grandmother.
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