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Daemon
Posted: Friday, September 18, 2015 12:00:00 AM
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perusal

(noun) Reading carefully with intent to remember.

Synonyms: poring over, studying

Usage: Many biographies have been written about her, but a perusal of her personal diaries is still the best way to learn about her life.
monamagda
Posted: Friday, September 18, 2015 6:18:58 AM

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The noun is perusal, the verb is peruse .

Notes: Today's word may already be a contranym, a word that is its own antonym, for many people in the US use it to mean "glance over quickly without thinking". 66% of the experts on the American Heritage Dictionary committee considers this meaning inappropriate. It is best to keep this a monosemantic (one-meaning) word. Contranyms too often lead to perverse misunderstandings.

In Play: Remember, we are trying to avoid the new meaning for this word creeping into US usage: "Honey, I've glanced over these insurance documents but haven't had time to peruse them. Could I sign them later?" Remember, peruse means to read thoroughly: "No, officer, I must admit I haven't perused all the laws of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; I have only skimmed over a few."

Word History: Peruse comes from the Latin prefix per- "thoroughly, through and through" (from the preposition per "through") + usus "used", the past participle of the irregular verb uti "to use". We don't find a complete parent, such as *peruti, in Classical Latin; it only begins showing up in post-Classical Latin in Britain in the 14th century. Norman French by that time had developed peruser "to examine, interrogate", the direct origin of today's Good Word. The meaning of the French word apparently developed into "examine a book carefully" in English.

http://www.alphadictionary.com/goodword/word/peruse
Elsayyed Hassan
Posted: Friday, September 18, 2015 11:25:47 AM

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Examples Word Origin
noun
1.
a reading:
a perusal of the current books.
2.
the act of perusing; survey; scrutiny:
A more careful perusal yields this conclusion.
Gary98
Posted: Friday, September 18, 2015 1:45:26 PM

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monamagda wrote:
The noun is perusal, the verb is peruse ...

http://www.alphadictionary.com/goodword/word/peruse


It is brave of you to tell American people what to mean by their word.
Verbatim
Posted: Friday, September 18, 2015 1:55:07 PM
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How "perusal" has been degenerating into meaning "glance over quickly" is indicative of changes in our attention span, and the overall willingness to be thorough.
Verbatim
Posted: Friday, September 18, 2015 2:23:33 PM
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Having perused the word of the day it strikes me that it was dated for posting one day prior to current date of September 18.
ChuckGary
Posted: Friday, September 18, 2015 4:39:45 PM

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Always thought 'to peruse' meant "glance over quickly without thinking" much, that was the majority where I learned English, and when I read the entrance in the Word of the Day, I said "WHAT? WRONG, FARLEX!"
That 66% of the experts find it inappropriate is one thing, to determine how the meaning evolves and how the people will use it, is another. I for one will teach that it means "to browse lightly", regardless of the percentage of experts who disagree. And since, as you point out, contranyms* are not very useful and rather add to confusion, I propose and hope that the meaning "to study carefully" will be the one to fall out of use.
* note - the spellchecker marks Contranyms as an error. Oh wait, that's Microsoft's fault, never mind. :)

NeuroticHellFem
Posted: Friday, September 18, 2015 6:55:27 PM

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Quote:
pe·ruse
(pə-ro͞oz′)
tr.v. pe·rused, pe·rus·ing, pe·rus·es
1. To read or examine, typically with great care.

2. Usage Problem To glance over; skim.


Verbatim wrote:
How "perusal" has been degenerating into meaning "glance over quickly" is indicative of changes in our attention span, and the overall willingness to be thorough.


I agree with Verbatim. I've got a half-witted acquaintance who insists on saying peruse when she means scan. Brick wall
Irma Crespo
Posted: Tuesday, September 22, 2015 1:57:14 AM

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perusal

Also found in: Legal, Wikipedia.



pe·ruse
(pə-ro͞oz′)
tr.v. pe·rused, pe·rus·ing, pe·rus·es
1. To read or examine, typically with great care.

2. Usage Problem To glance over; skim.
Fredric-frank Myers
Posted: Monday, September 28, 2015 3:15:24 PM

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Location: Apache Junction, Arizona, United States
Interesting to perusal.
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