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richsap
Posted: Monday, November 22, 2010 8:24:05 AM
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Joined: 7/16/2010
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Here in the United States we are poised to celebrate the national holiday of Thanksgiving. The holiday is in honor of the Pilgrims who settled in North America, seeking to avoid persecution for their religious beliefs (they did not subscribe to the same beliefs as the Church of England).

We use this day to recreate the great feast that the pilgrims and Native Americans held to celebrate the fall harvest and to take time to reflect on all that we are thankful for.

I'm thankful for this website and forum... that many people from many nations both great and small can exchange thoughts, ideas and experiences to teach and learn from others.

This week let us celebrate both our common interests and our differences and the fact that the two can coexist. Whatever your age, gender, race, creed, color or religious beliefs, bless you!
Atiya
Posted: Monday, November 22, 2010 8:29:25 AM
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Location: India
I heard that thnaksgiving is never complete without a stuffed turkey so here it is,


[image not available]


Thanks for helping me learn more about different cultures, religions and ofcourse english Anxious

lenam
Posted: Monday, November 22, 2010 8:30:13 AM
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Happy Thanksgiving, richsap, and all our fellow members from the US.
B355E
Posted: Monday, November 22, 2010 9:06:45 AM
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Location: Serbia
Nicely put, richsap, thank you! Happy Thanksgiving!
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Monday, November 22, 2010 9:13:31 AM

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Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
All the others can rejoice for the feast, but...



[image not available]


Happy Thanksgiving, Americans, and all the others too!
Dancing Dancing Dancing
Cat
Posted: Monday, November 22, 2010 11:06:16 AM

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Joined: 4/10/2010
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Location: Waterloo, Ontario, Canada
Thanksgiving has always been my favorite holiday. It has always been about family, extended family and friends, not gifts. When my mom, sister and I were living in San Francisco we didn't have a car and so couldn't drive to be with family in southern California. My mother invited a few people from her work to join us who also weren't able to travel to family.

I repeated this tradition my first year in university by inviting other students that couldn't go home. We had a great potluck where I provided the turkey and everyone else brought their favorite side dish.

This year I plan to make Thanksgiving dinner on Thursday even though I'm in Canada. I haven't any family here and have no way of traveling to the states. It is not a holiday here but I want to pass on this tradition for my kids so turkey and fixings on Thursday it is.
martyg
Posted: Monday, November 22, 2010 11:09:36 AM
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imo, thanksgiving day is the best of the best of all holidays. usually people just gather together to eat and watch the ball games and talk about nice things. outside of eating too much, there is relatively no downside and it is one of the usa's best exports.

remember all the members of the armed forces deployed around the world and hope for their safety.
boneyfriend
Posted: Monday, November 22, 2010 11:16:29 AM

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Happy Thanksgiving to all. We used to like it because it was the only day that you got two days off from work. But it ushers in the whole wonderful Christmas season. This year I am going to my friend's house. This is the friend who gave me my username. Of her two boys and their families, only one comes for Thanksgiving so to make her table larger she always includes me and my son. I am taking the dessert this year. Hope it comes out alright.
Remember the hungry. It does exist in America. Keep your local food bank well stocked.
redgriffin
Posted: Monday, November 22, 2010 11:17:27 AM
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Location: Portland, Oregon, United States
richsap wrote:
Here in the United States we are poised to celebrate the national holiday of Thanksgiving. The holiday is in honor of the Pilgrims who settled in North America, seeking to avoid persecution for their religious beliefs (they did not subscribe to the same beliefs as the Church of England.).
Actually the holiday was started to celebrate the f\victories at Petersburg during the American Civil War it was started by a Proclamation signed by Honest Abe himself that the last Thursday in November should be a day of Thanksgiving. The Pilgrims were added to it some years later to keep the holiday alive and to show that it was a quintessential American Feast Day. The truth is that we don't really know if and when the first harvest feast between the Indians and the Pilgrims took place.

Still to each of you and yours I want to wish each of you a happy and safe Thanksgiving and to all of our troops overseas Thanks you for your sacrifice.
chopperpilot01
Posted: Monday, November 22, 2010 11:20:36 AM
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Location: Eastern North Carolina, United States
redgriffin wrote:
Still to each of you and yours I want to wish each of you a happy and safe Thanksgiving and to all of our troops overseas Thanks you for your sacrifice.


Agreed
Apple Blossom
Posted: Monday, November 22, 2010 2:13:24 PM
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Joined: 5/19/2010
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Atiya wrote:
I heard that thanksgiving is never complete without a stuffed turkey


True, Atiya. That's why we're inviting this guy:



[image not available]
Apple Blossom
Posted: Monday, November 22, 2010 2:27:26 PM
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Bring on the tofu!



[image not available]
lemonk
Posted: Monday, November 22, 2010 5:24:51 PM
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Location: United States
Happy Thanksgiving to all! I'll be celebrating Apple Blossom-style, with the turkey still gobbling away while I enjoy the tofu Dancing
Neri_Here
Posted: Monday, November 22, 2010 6:20:07 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/11/2010
Posts: 114
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richsap wrote:
Here in the United States we are poised to celebrate the national holiday of Thanksgiving. The holiday is in honor of the Pilgrims who settled in North America, seeking to avoid persecution for their religious beliefs (they did not subscribe to the same beliefs as the Church of England).

We use this day to recreate the great feast that the pilgrims and Native Americans held to celebrate the fall harvest and to take time to reflect on all that we are thankful for.

I'm thankful for this website and forum... that many people from many nations both great and small can exchange thoughts, ideas and experiences to teach and learn from others.

This week let us celebrate both our common interests and our differences and the fact that the two can coexist. Whatever your age, gender, race, creed, color or religious beliefs, bless you!


Nice one richsap:-) Isn't US Thanksgiving this year is on the 25th ( fourth Thursday of November). I found it funny that we (Philippines) don't really have this holiday. Though we have number of feasts here(Spanish influence),I think, we don't have a holiday for harvest that is celebrated simultaneously by everyone here in my country.
HAPPY THANKSGIVING! :-)
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Monday, November 22, 2010 6:24:42 PM

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Joined: 9/21/2009
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wercozy
Posted: Monday, November 22, 2010 6:31:07 PM
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Any ideas for a vegan Thanksgiving?
Neri_Here
Posted: Monday, November 22, 2010 6:55:44 PM
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Mmmm that's a hard one wercozy because Vegans endeavor to never consume or use any animal products of any type.
excaelis
Posted: Monday, November 22, 2010 6:59:44 PM

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wercozy wrote:
Any ideas for a vegan Thanksgiving?


Tofurkey ?
Babezy
Posted: Monday, November 22, 2010 7:39:03 PM
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I strongly dislike almost everything about traditional Thanksgiving. When I decided I was through with it, my mom unexpectedly went rogue and joined me. Now everybody's happy--the traditionalists have it all their way, we have it all our way. Mom and I go to a restaurant and eat non-traditional food, and then go to the movies. The other relatives group together, watch sports, eat turkey. We're all thankful!
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Monday, November 22, 2010 8:12:56 PM

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wercozy wrote:
Any ideas for a vegan Thanksgiving?


Fried vegetables and aubergine jam ("Patlıcan reçeli") in Antalya, Turkey.
dmt7679
Posted: Monday, November 22, 2010 9:29:15 PM
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Location: United States
I still think we should of gone with the Turkey instead of the Eagle for our National bird, lord knows they taste better :) O benny franklin how come we didnt listen to you more and why are there none of you in my pocket?
Sparrow
Posted: Monday, November 22, 2010 10:18:56 PM
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Location: United States
I am pleased to have a chance to say Happy Thanksgiving to all who is going to celebrate it.
Don't have a picture handy, but have just read some tips on the Thanksgiving dinner and would like to share some.

***If your turkey is still frozen, you'll defrost the bird faster by soaking it in a cold bath.

***If you need a large turkey: Consider buying two 10- to 12-pound birds and roasting them side by side. Small turkeys cook (and defrost) much more quickly than supersize ones, and they tend to stay moister.


The tip on the large turkey came too late to me. I do need a large bird and bought one - 23 pounds. Now it is sitting in my fridge scaring the life out of me. How in the earth am I going to cook that jumbo birdy?!

Who is going to do what on the day after Thanksgiving? Shopping? I am not: I will be sleeping in, but later in the afternoon pulling out the Christmas tree. We always do it on the Friday after Thanksgiving.

Anyway,Happy Thanksgiving!
fayalso
Posted: Monday, November 22, 2010 11:01:34 PM

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Joined: 5/1/2009
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Location: Jewett City, Connecticut, United States
Sparrow wrote:
I am pleased to have a chance to say Happy Thanksgiving to all who is going to celebrate it.
Don't have a picture handy, but have just read some tips on the Thanksgiving dinner and would like to share some.

***If your turkey is still frozen, you'll defrost the bird faster by soaking it in a cold bath.

***If you need a large turkey: Consider buying two 10- to 12-pound birds and roasting them side by side. Small turkeys cook (and defrost) much more quickly than supersize ones, and they tend to stay moister.


The tip on the large turkey came too late to me. I do need a large bird and bought one - 23 pounds. Now it is sitting in my fridge scaring the life out of me. How in the earth am I going to cook that jumbo birdy?!

Who is going to do what on the day after Thanksgiving? Shopping? I am not: I will be sleeping in, but later in the afternoon pulling out the Christmas tree. We always do it on the Friday after Thanksgiving.

Anyway,Happy Thanksgiving!


Sparrow, I always cook my turkey in a roasting bag. It comes out juicy and tender and cooks so much faster. Plus, no basting and there are plenty of drippings to make the gravy. I'm not going shopping, either, on Friday. Instead, I'll spend the day making the leftover bones into turkey soup. Enjoy! Can't you smell it already?
lenam
Posted: Tuesday, November 23, 2010 1:14:24 AM
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What is the significance of turkey during Thanksgiving? Can anyone please enlighten me? Thanks.
Christine
Posted: Tuesday, November 23, 2010 5:39:14 AM
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http://www.toilette-humor.com/thanksgiving/turkey-stuffing.shtml

Turkey on TV teaching other Turkeys
"How to Stuff a Human for Thanksgiving"
richsap
Posted: Tuesday, November 23, 2010 8:06:45 AM
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lenam wrote:
What is the significance of turkey during Thanksgiving? Can anyone please enlighten me? Thanks.


That's a really good question... anyone know the answer? I'd like to know myself!
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Tuesday, November 23, 2010 8:10:31 AM

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Image slideshow in Life Magazine: Everyone Loves Turkey
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Tuesday, November 23, 2010 8:33:29 AM

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Joined: 9/21/2009
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richsap wrote:
lenam wrote:
What is the significance of turkey during Thanksgiving? Can anyone please enlighten me? Thanks.


That's a really good question... anyone know the answer? I'd like to know myself!



When the first settlers arrived in North America they found the forests were full of these big birds unable to fly, easy to catch, plenty of food and easily domesticated. The Wild Turkey, throughout its range, is a bird known to have played (and continues to play) a significant role in the day-to-day lives of Native American tribes all over North America. It was a favourite meal in Eastern tribes. They consumed both the eggs and meat, sometimes turning the latter into a type of jerky to preserve it and make it last through cold weather. The feathers of turkeys also often made their way into the rituals and headgear of many tribes: though separated by hundreds of miles, tribes like the Sioux, the Wampanoag, the Powhatan, and the Hopi all wore turkey feathers in their hair or on their person, with the feather and the bird holding a different significance to the different peoples.

The idea that Benjamin Franklin preferred the Turkey as the national bird of the United States comes from a letter he wrote to his daughter, Sarah Bache on January 26, 1784 criticizing the choice of the Bald Eagle as the national bird and suggesting that a Turkey would have made a better alternative.

Quote:
"For my own part I wish the Bald Eagle had not been chosen the Representative of our Country. He is a Bird of bad moral character. He does not get his Living honestly. You may have seen him perched on some dead Tree near the River, where, too lazy to fish for himself, he watches the Labour of the Fishing Hawk; and when that diligent Bird has at length taken a Fish, and is bearing it to his Nest for the Support of his Mate and young Ones, the Bald Eagle pursues him and takes it from him.

With all this Injustice, he is never in good Case but like those among Men who live by Sharping & Robbing he is generally poor and often very lousy. Besides he is a rank Coward: The little King Bird not bigger than a Sparrow attacks him boldly and drives him out of the District. He is therefore by no means a proper Emblem for the brave and honest Cincinnati of America who have driven all the King birds from our Country...

I am on this account not displeased that the Figure is not known as a Bald Eagle, but looks more like a Turkey. For the Truth the Turkey is in Comparison a much more respectable Bird, and withal a true original Native of America... He is besides, though a little vain & silly, a Bird of Courage, and would not hesitate to attack a Grenadier of the British Guards who should presume to invade his Farm Yard with a red Coat on."


This letter to Franklin's daughter was written after Congress spent six years choosing the eagle as the emblem of the newly formed country. Franklin's disapproval with the choice of the Bald Eagle appears evident but may have been made with mock indignation since it is not apparent that he ever officially advocated the use of the turkey as a national emblem.
(quoted from TFD)

Some fellow Americans here can tell much more, I think...
Wanderer
Posted: Tuesday, November 23, 2010 11:45:13 AM

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Thanksgiving is one of my favorite celebrations! I love the smells of spicy pumpkin pies cooking, the dark red and tartness of cranberries, and turkey. All of these are foods that are native to the Americas. The first settlers were accustomed to having days of fasting and prayers after harvest. After the people had thanked God for his bounty and good care they asked for blessings for the cold, hard winter coming. They shared their food with one another and made a feast. The Native Americans showed up, maybe out of curiosity and they were asked to join in. This was really an Old World custom of Thanksgiving. The History Channel has a very good presentation.

My family doesn't stuff our turkey. We make dressing.

I almost forgot one of my very favorites! Sweet potatoes baked with cinnamon and butter and sugar until they are caramelized with browned marshmallows. We always serve mash potatoes and maybe potato salad.

Salads. Everyone usually brings a new recipe. It is the fun to share new recipes with my relatives. The guys cook too. They usually smoke briskets in the yard. Maybe it just gets them out of the house and lets them watch the kids, whatever. It works with us.

I am trying to find some new recipes on line so, I should go. I hope you all enjoy the blessings that you have received and remember those who have less. And, if you have a chance to invite someone to share with you or you are invited to share then it makes it a true Thanksgiving
khanhminhlala
Posted: Tuesday, November 23, 2010 12:39:49 PM
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Location: Vietnam
In Vietnam, there is no Thanksgiving day. And to me, it is really joyful when reading about this from you guys. So interesting! ^_^

HAPPY THANKSGIVING.
Vickster
Posted: Tuesday, November 23, 2010 2:36:37 PM
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Happy Thanksgiving to all....and if you don't celebrate Thanksgiving... celebrate on that day, Nov. 25th for all that you have.... family, health, love, a home, a job... and share that love with those who love you back!!

What are you all most thankful for??? Mine are my two beautiful boys...
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Tuesday, November 23, 2010 4:14:41 PM

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Wanderer wrote:

I am trying to find some new recipes on line so, I should go. I hope you all enjoy the blessings that you have received and remember those who have less. And, if you have a chance to invite someone to share with you or you are invited to share then it makes it a true Thanksgiving


FINNISH SWEETENED POTATO CASSEROLE (a traditional Christmas dinner site dish, in Finnish imelletty perunalaatikko)

In the making of the traditional Finnish sweetened potato casserole, wheat flour is added to warm, mashed potatoes and the mixture is left to stand in a warm place for several hours.

During this time, the amylase in the flour will start to break down the potatoes' starch into sugars, sweetening the dish. The ideal temperature for this sweetening process is between 55 and 75 °C. If the temperature exceeds 75 - 80 °C, the process will be stopped, due to the breakdown of the amylase molecules.

This traditional way of making the casserole will take several hours, so instead of waiting for the mixture to sweeten naturally, one can cut corners by just adding a little dark molasses to the batter. This method is highly disapproved by the potato casserole purists, though :-)

The potatoes used in this recipe must be floury, because their starch content is higher than that of waxy potatoes. Best result is gained when using late autumn and early winter potato varieties. New potatoes and the like should never be used.

Traditional way of making potato casserole:

1 kg floury winter potatoes
about 500 ml water for cooking (or enough to just cover the potatoes)
2 tbsp flour
25 g butter
about 400 ml whole milk
about 1 tsp salt

Brush the potatoes clean, but do not peel them. Cook the potatoes in unsalted water until tender. Save some of the cooking liquid. Place the uncovered pan back to the warm stove plate so that the excess moisture will evaporate, and the potatoes feel dry. Using protective gloves, peel the hot potatoes and puree them using a food mill. Work quickly, as the mixture must not cool too much. The ideal temperature is between 55 and 75 °C.

Add some of the reserved hot cooking liquid in the puree, especially if it is very dry. Note that the potato mixture will turn considerably runnier during the sweetening process, so do not add too much liquid either. While the puree is still hot (55 - 75 °C), sprinkle the flour on top of it and mix it in. Cover the dish tightly with a lid or a piece of foil and place to sweeten in a warm place, like in a cool oven (about 60 - 70 °C). Since it is vital to keep the temperature stable, it is best to monitor it by using a reliable thermometer (eg a digital meat thermometer).

Let the potato puree stand overnight in the warm oven, mixing it a few times. When the mixture has turned slightly sweet and is runnier, it is ready to be baked. Melt the butter and mix it in together with the salt. Stir in enough milk until the puree has the consistency of a runny porridge or a thick gruel. You may need more milk than stated in the recipe.

Pour the batter into one or two buttered oven casseroles. Make sure you fill the dishes only halfway as the batter will rise and bubble during baking. Bake the casseroles either at 150 - 175 °C for about 2 to 3 hours, or overnight (about 8 hours) at 80 - 90 °C, until the batter has thickened and nicely caramelized on top. The longer cooking time at a lower temperature will give a better result.

You can try this recipe by replacing potato with sweet potato. It'll be as good but not traditional Finnish! I call it bataattilaatikko.
kitten
Posted: Tuesday, November 23, 2010 5:37:58 PM
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Joined: 12/28/2009
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Location: the city by the bay
richsap wrote:
Here in the United States we are poised to celebrate the national holiday of Thanksgiving. The holiday is in honor of the Pilgrims who settled in North America, seeking to avoid persecution for their religious beliefs (they did not subscribe to the same beliefs as the Church of England).

We use this day to recreate the great feast that the pilgrims and Native Americans held to celebrate the fall harvest and to take time to reflect on all that we are thankful for.

I'm thankful for this website and forum... that many people from many nations both great and small can exchange thoughts, ideas and experiences to teach and learn from others.

This week let us celebrate both our common interests and our differences and the fact that the two can coexist. Whatever y
our age, gender, race, creed, color or religious beliefs, bless you!



Hello to all,


The above sentiments are indeed lovely...............and I have very mixed feelings about those who landed on these shores so long ago.

They wanted their religious freedom and chose to takeover, change or annihilate the Indigineous People's of this country in order to move their religious movement forward, and grab and settle land that was not theirs. There was enough land for all but sadly some did not hold this belief. Greedy, yes. Selfesh, yes. Rude, yes. Poor guests, yes. Learned anything from it? Don't think so but always hope so.

Please remember the Native American's who kindly helped those poor people keep themselves together literally body and soul by showing them how to fish, forge for food, cultivate the land, and sustain crops.

The Native American is still at the bottom of the totem pole, no pun intended. And they have one of the if not the highest suicide rates amongst all the races of the US. There are groups to help support young Native Americans and no I don't mean those Natives who run the Casinos as some really don't help their own and yes it is on them, the shame I mean.

To all those who enjoy this day thank a Native and those who were/are willing to learn and not destroy.


peace out >^,,^<

excaelis
Posted: Tuesday, November 23, 2010 5:41:33 PM

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lenam wrote:
What is the significance of turkey during Thanksgiving? Can anyone please enlighten me? Thanks.


Relatively easy to shoot ?
abcxyz
Posted: Wednesday, November 24, 2010 5:02:21 AM
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Location: India
Happy thanksgivingDancing
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