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midwife Options
Tito
Posted: Sunday, May 3, 2009 10:29:21 PM
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Location: Argentina
I know they are mostly women, but is the same word used for men assisting a woman at childbirth?
Wolfie
Posted: Monday, May 4, 2009 7:47:19 AM
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I don't know about the english word, but the norwegian version which is "Jordmor" ("jord" meaning 'earth' and "mor" meaning 'mother'), when addressing a male midwife we just switch "Mor" with "Far".
Where 'Far' means father, making it "Earthfather"
Ahimsa
Posted: Monday, May 4, 2009 8:28:48 AM
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Hi Tito, that's a great question.

In the American tv show "Private Practice" one of the characters is male, interpreted by Chris Lowell, and he's the midwife, and is address as such.
risadr
Posted: Monday, May 4, 2009 8:58:50 AM
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One of the staffers at the hospital where I gave birth to my daughter was a male nurse-midwife. He was an RN, whose specialty was labor assistance. I don't think that the term "midwife" applies so much to the gender of the individual as to the nature of the position which s/he holds.

Ahimsa wrote:
In the American tv show "Private Practice" one of the characters is male, interpreted by Chris Lowell, and he's the midwife, and is address as such.


Dell is one of my favorite characters!
Drew
Posted: Monday, May 4, 2009 11:44:01 AM
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Tito wrote:
I know they are mostly women, but is the same word used for men assisting a woman at childbirth?


I believe the same word is used to refer to men as well as women assisting in childbirth. However, if I were a male midwife, I would probably want a more masculine alternative to be used in reference to my profession. The sole use of the term "midwife" seems slightly antiquated to me. Does anyone have a good suggestion for an alternative term?
fred
Posted: Monday, May 4, 2009 12:01:25 PM
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Man-midwife
alliejoan
Posted: Monday, May 4, 2009 5:16:25 PM
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fred wrote:
Man-midwife


I've been reading your posts, "Fred." You have quite the sense of humor. I love it!!
risadr
Posted: Tuesday, May 5, 2009 10:25:42 AM
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Joined: 3/16/2009
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Location: PA, United States
Drew wrote:
Tito wrote:
I know they are mostly women, but is the same word used for men assisting a woman at childbirth?


I believe the same word is used to refer to men as well as women assisting in childbirth. However, if I were a male midwife, I would probably want a more masculine alternative to be used in reference to my profession. The sole use of the term "midwife" seems slightly antiquated to me. Does anyone have a good suggestion for an alternative term?


I disagree that "midwife" is an antiquated term. However, I can understand why a man may not want to be referred to as an anything-wife. Many midwives are also LPNs or RNs, making them nurse-midwives, and a male nurse-midwife could always opt to be called a "nurse," instead, if the term midwife made him feel somehow emasculated.
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