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Possesive Usage Help, mosts Options
Epiphileon
Posted: Sunday, May 3, 2009 10:55:53 AM

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Hi all, little help please,
"my approach to statistics in psychology was much more critical than mosts."
Can mosts, be used in this way, is there another way to say this?
Firefox spell check indicates no apostrophe.

risadr
Posted: Sunday, May 3, 2009 2:54:01 PM
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Context?

My first instinct is to say "my approach to statistics in psychology was much more critical that most's."
xsmith
Posted: Sunday, May 3, 2009 4:54:40 PM
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"my approach to statistics in psychology was much more critical than mosts."

Keep it simple: My approach to statistics in psychology was much more critical than most or
My approach to statistics in psychology was much more critical than most
others.
catskincatskin
Posted: Sunday, May 3, 2009 6:15:07 PM
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Epiphileon wrote:
Hi all, little help please,
"my approach to statistics in psychology was much more critical than mosts."
Can mosts, be used in this way, is there another way to say this?
Firefox spell check indicates no apostrophe.



"Most" doesn't need to be possessive here. It's an adjective. Only nouns can be possessive. "Most" here means "most approaches." So I'd go with the suggestion above: "... much more critical than most."


I've never seen the word "mosts" before.
Luftmarque
Posted: Sunday, May 3, 2009 7:26:39 PM

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catskincatskin wrote:
"Most" doesn't need to be possessive here. It's an adjective. Only nouns can be possessive. "Most" here means "most approaches." So I'd go with the suggestion above: "... much more critical than most."
I've never seen the word "mosts" before.

Me neither—my intuition is that it is not a word in English. It gets flagged by Firefox's spell-checker, but that proves nothing since a lot of perfectly good words are missed by that program. Googling it turned up one usage that seemed reasonable to me: a high-school yearbook that had a page devoted to a list of mosts, e.g. the graduate with the most athletic awards etc.
Then again, there's always my mom's "the hostess with the mostess."
Epiphileon
Posted: Sunday, May 3, 2009 8:40:28 PM

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Thank you every one, as I've said before, I am certain my grammar still needs improvement. Here is the context the problem arose in.
"My undergrad emphasis was in Psychometrics and it was in this course that I met the first of my two mentors. Jim Wakefield had been a student of Hans Eysenck, the first investigator to directly tie individual differences in personality to individual differences in brain activity. During this time I also took a number of Math department classes in probability and statistical theory, so that my approach to statistics in psychology was much more critical than most."
Luftmarque
Posted: Sunday, May 3, 2009 9:35:01 PM

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Epiphileon wrote:
"During this time I also took a number of Math department classes in probability and statistical theory, so that my approach to statistics in psychology was much more critical than most."

Most seems fine there. I wonder about the use of critical though. Do you mean that your approach was more questioning or that statistics were more important or that you were more analytical or what exactly? I suspect that you may be able to find a better word.
stella
Posted: Sunday, May 3, 2009 11:11:03 PM
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In "my approach to statistics in psychology was much more critical than mosts",
does 'most' refer to approaches? If so, is it correct to use most 'alone' that way? I mean, much more critical than most... what? Please, help me out. Thanks.
Epiphileon
Posted: Monday, May 4, 2009 5:29:46 AM

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Luftmarque wrote:
Epiphileon wrote:
"During this time I also took a number of Math department classes in probability and statistical theory, so that my approach to statistics in psychology was much more critical than most."

Most seems fine there. I wonder about the use of critical though. Do you mean that your approach was more questioning or that statistics were more important or that you were more analytical or what exactly? I suspect that you may be able to find a better word.

So do I; the first choice would have been "rigor"; however, I felt that may be more vague to some one with no scientific training. The only way I can think of to make it more clear, would be to use more words. I don't know of any way to communicate easily what I mean to someone unfamiliar with the use of inferential statistics, one of the most abused areas of mathematics known to man.
Imagine how a professional critic evaluates a stage performance, it might be a reasonable analogy to how I approached statistics in psychology. Perhaps even more apt would be the judging of the mandatory "figures" in olympic figure skating. A statistical mathematician would understand immediately what I was saying, most psychologists who use statistics would probably be insulted.
I try to be very careful when referencing any of my training within psychology, as most of psychology is still firmly rooted in pseudo science. So given all that, if you can think of a way of making my original statement more clearly, I would certainly appreciate it.

Epiphileon
Posted: Monday, May 4, 2009 5:31:37 AM

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stella wrote:
In "my approach to statistics in psychology was much more critical than mosts",
does 'most' refer to approaches? If so, is it correct to use most 'alone' that way? I mean, much more critical than most... what? Please, help me out. Thanks.


Hi Stella, it refers to how most others approach the use of statistics in psychology.
MiTziGo
Posted: Monday, May 4, 2009 12:45:38 PM
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stella wrote:
In "my approach to statistics in psychology was much more critical than mosts",
does 'most' refer to approaches? If so, is it correct to use most 'alone' that way? I mean, much more critical than most... what? Please, help me out. Thanks.

I believe the word "approach" is implied in this context, and so even when it is left out, the sentence's meaning is understood. This usage avoids the redundancy of saying "my approach to statistics in psychology was much more critical than most approaches."
stella
Posted: Monday, May 4, 2009 9:07:03 PM
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Epiphileon, hi: still ununderstandable to me, dear. Sorry.


MichalG: (...) This usage avoids the redundancy of saying "my approach to statistics in psychology was much more critical than most approaches."

Yes, this I understand. Accordingly, wouldn't it be correct to say: "my approach to statistics in psychology was much more critical than most of them"? Thanks a lot.
Picaro
Posted: Wednesday, May 6, 2009 5:03:36 AM
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Joined: 4/26/2009
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Location: India
catskincatskin wrote:


"Most" doesn't need to be possessive here. It's an adjective. Only nouns can be possessive. "Most" here means "most approaches." So I'd go with the suggestion above: "... much more critical than most."


I've never seen the word "mosts" before.


but farlex says most can be used as a noun as well.then why can't it be most's?
Luftmarque
Posted: Wednesday, May 6, 2009 5:20:00 AM

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Location: Pau, Aquitaine, France
Epiphileon wrote:
Luftmarque wrote:
Epiphileon wrote:
"During this time I also took a number of Math department classes in probability and statistical theory, so that my approach to statistics in psychology was much more critical than most."

Most seems fine there. I wonder about the use of critical though. Do you mean that your approach was more questioning or that statistics were more important or that you were more analytical or what exactly? I suspect that you may be able to find a better word.

So do I; the first choice would have been "rigor"; however, I felt that may be more vague to some one with no scientific training. The only way I can think of to make it more clear, would be to use more words. I don't know of any way to communicate easily what I mean to someone unfamiliar with the use of inferential statistics, one of the most abused areas of mathematics known to man.
Imagine how a professional critic evaluates a stage performance, it might be a reasonable analogy to how I approached statistics in psychology. Perhaps even more apt would be the judging of the mandatory "figures" in olympic figure skating. A statistical mathematician would understand immediately what I was saying, most psychologists who use statistics would probably be insulted.
I try to be very careful when referencing any of my training within psychology, as most of psychology is still firmly rooted in pseudo science. So given all that, if you can think of a way of making my original statement more clearly, I would certainly appreciate it.

The more I think about it, the better I like substituting rigorous for critical in the sentence. I do think that most non-mathematically trained people would understand it without being insulted (most people are inclined to put themselves in the favored category, so, even if they don't really understand statistics, they'd probably think you were talking about other psychologists). It was your first choice, and it is accurate.
Epiphileon
Posted: Wednesday, May 6, 2009 5:26:09 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/22/2009
Posts: 4,287
Neurons: 166,581

The more I think about it, the better I like substituting rigorous for critical in the sentence. I do think that most non-mathematically trained people would understand it without being insulted (most people are inclined to put themselves in the favored category, so, even if they don't really understand statistics, they'd probably think you were talking about other psychologists). It was your first choice, and it is accurate.[/quote]

Your right Mark, thank you, somehow I had been thinking I would use "rigor", perhaps I'd worded that phrase differently then. Rigorous works perfectly.
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