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Is the verb “rock” a fashion those days? Options
TALBUIXE
Posted: Tuesday, October 26, 2010 2:21:56 AM

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Location: Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain
The context is as follow:

“Your presentation will rock the World”.

What does it mean? Think

Thx. in advance.
blue2
Posted: Tuesday, October 26, 2010 3:13:09 AM

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It means it will make a huge impression on the world. Make an impact, have a powerful effect. Make everybody stand up and take notice.
Win
Posted: Tuesday, October 26, 2010 3:30:15 AM
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Location: India
I agree with blue2 but would also like to add that this impact/impression can be both positive or negative ...

like 'the presentation' may cause a violent shock to the world..or..it may get recognition and win accolades from all over the world.


Example : The girl rocked the party with her dance steps.
She is the one who rocked my friends marriage life.
thar
Posted: Tuesday, October 26, 2010 5:12:07 AM

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the old usage is to rock something, to tip it, to move it, gently or violently:
you rock a baby to sleep
don't rock the boat
you rock my world!!

but also now means something is really good, exciting
Belfast rocks!!
shabz
Posted: Tuesday, October 26, 2010 6:11:01 AM
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Location: Kuwait
It could also mean, bring immense pleasure or happiness.
Babezy
Posted: Tuesday, October 26, 2010 9:15:49 PM
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I think in the big impact sense they mean something more like an earthquake than a cradle, as in "The tremor rocked the building to its foundations." The kids' slang around here makes no sense to me, though. When they think you've done something great they say, "You rock out loud!"
TALBUIXE
Posted: Wednesday, October 27, 2010 2:15:25 AM

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Joined: 4/21/2009
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Neurons: 139
Location: Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain
You all "rock" me with your wisdom.

Thanks a lot.
thar
Posted: Wednesday, October 27, 2010 4:45:28 AM

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Babezy wrote:
I think in the big impact sense they mean something more like an earthquake than a cradle, as in "The tremor rocked the building to its foundations." The kids' slang around here makes no sense to me, though. When they think you've done something great they say, "You rock out loud!"


assuming you are not twelve years old (and in the it crowd), if kids' slang made sense to you they would be doing it wrong!
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Wednesday, October 27, 2010 5:06:43 AM

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Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
thar wrote:
Babezy wrote:
I think in the big impact sense they mean something more like an earthquake than a cradle, as in "The tremor rocked the building to its foundations." The kids' slang around here makes no sense to me, though. When they think you've done something great they say, "You rock out loud!"


assuming you are not twelve years old (and in the it crowd), if kids' slang made sense to you they would be doing it wrong!


Hey, it's not only kid's talk. I've heard many times "you rock, man!"
thar
Posted: Wednesday, October 27, 2010 5:39:54 AM

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Jyrkkä Jätkä wrote:
thar wrote:
Babezy wrote:
I think in the big impact sense they mean something more like an earthquake than a cradle, as in "The tremor rocked the building to its foundations." The kids' slang around here makes no sense to me, though. When they think you've done something great they say, "You rock out loud!"


assuming you are not twelve years old (and in the it crowd), if kids' slang made sense to you they would be doing it wrong!


Hey, it's not only kid's talk. I've heard many times "you rock, man!"


that is sooo last decade, or the decade before that. I think the American one has gone away and come around again!
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Wednesday, October 27, 2010 8:28:43 AM

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thar wrote:
Jyrkkä Jätkä wrote:

Hey, it's not only kid's talk. I've heard many times "you rock, man!"


that is sooo last decade, or the decade before that. I think the American one has gone away and come around again!


Just a couple of weeks ago a lady about my age said that to me, ehem! ;-)
thar
Posted: Wednesday, October 27, 2010 9:23:53 AM

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Jyrkkä Jätkä wrote:
thar wrote:
Jyrkkä Jätkä wrote:

Hey, it's not only kid's talk. I've heard many times "you rock, man!"


that is sooo last decade, or the decade before that. I think the American one has gone away and come around again!


Just a couple of weeks ago a lady about my age said that to me, ehem! ;-)


ah, I think that was retro rock. so not cool. The kids are new rock. except they didn't leave it long enough, so it caught up with retro rock and the cool and the uncool are mixing. Which in itself is very uncool. Which against the rule that energy cannot be created or destroyed. We must be moving into quantum rock coolness!
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Wednesday, October 27, 2010 10:15:46 AM

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While my actual mother tongue, stadin slangi, constantly evolves the younger speakers still can understand me and vice versa.

(Have a look at that link, it might interest you.)

thar
Posted: Wednesday, October 27, 2010 10:32:53 AM

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Joined: 7/8/2010
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Jyrkkä Jätkä wrote:
While my actual mother tongue, stadin slangi, constantly evolves the younger speakers still can understand me and vice versa.

(Have a look at that link, it might interest you.)



thanks JJ
(although I am suffering from not being motivated about an essay, i need that delete usere button - somebody stop me)

isn't it weird that so many slangs are using foreign words - I suppose you want to prove you are more cosmopolitan than the oldies!

I like the idea of proper slang, as well. Isn't the whole idea that you are rebelling against 'proper language'.

If it is any good slang eventually beds its way into a language until the proper people speak it. I only recently found the English word scarper (which, if I had thought about it, would have thought old) was from rhyming slang go-scapa flow, which must mean it is from the end of the first world war at the earliest, as I am sure no-one had heard of it before that! But now I would consider it normal (if informal) English!
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