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van der? Options
smk
Posted: Monday, October 18, 2010 5:48:10 PM
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I heard the phrase "don't be van der the reprimander" in a movie clip. This was said by the main character to his friend who was upset he was having a party. This friend was going to end the main character's party.

I know what reprimander means (one who reprimands) but what does "van der" mean or refer to?
deebee
Posted: Monday, October 18, 2010 7:05:27 PM
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Hi smk
Are you sure you heard this right? It doesn't make sense to me either!
RuthP
Posted: Monday, October 18, 2010 7:20:10 PM

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If heard correctly, my thought would be to consider "Van" to be a proper name; "der" is the German word for "the."

Thus, "Don't be Van der reprimander" takes advantage of 1.) the similar sounds of "Van der" and "reprimander" and 2.) the implication of overweening discipline often associated with Germany.

I would consider this even more likely if Van Diesel were a part of the cast.
fayalso
Posted: Monday, October 18, 2010 7:20:11 PM

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Could van der be a name? Vander?
saintvivant
Posted: Monday, October 18, 2010 11:36:44 PM
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I believe this means "of the" ans is a common prefix in Holland for proper names like Chris van der Ver meaning Chris of the (house of) Ver. As used in your example it just means literally "of the reprimander" but it sounds better and gives the phrase a playful quality to use "van der".
Shelley
Posted: Tuesday, October 19, 2010 1:24:16 AM
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'Van der' is common in Afrikaans surnames (of Dutch origin) and does mean 'of the'. You'll find Van der Merwe, Van der Ruit, Van der Sand, etc. So I reckon this was just joke name: Van der Reprimander being something akin to Mr Partypooper - or similar.
Angus
Posted: Tuesday, October 19, 2010 4:25:32 AM
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If you listen to rap you will hear a lot of inane forced rhymes like this. In some circles this is taken for cleverness.
yongxin
Posted: Wednesday, October 20, 2010 1:46:14 PM
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I believe that 'Vander...' is also in American names
excaelis
Posted: Wednesday, October 20, 2010 4:04:33 PM

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yongxin wrote:
I believe that 'Vander...' is also in American names


Such as Vanderbilt ? True, yonqxin, but that is still a Dutch name. I believe it would have originally been written van der Bilt ( of/from Bilt [ whatever 'bilt' is ]). Remember, most American names come from somewhere else.
yongxin
Posted: Thursday, October 21, 2010 5:36:08 PM
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Yes, I'm aware of that. I even wanted to mention it in my previous post, but don't know why I didn't. Yes, it would have been van der Bilt. De Bilt is a place in the Netherlands - most likely that they were originally from there.
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