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pull your head (skull) in = shut up or mind your own business Options
vil
Posted: Monday, September 13, 2010 11:58:13 AM
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Location: Bulgaria
Would you help to me to understand properly the meaning of the following sentence? It is from an Australian book?

“I think it is very kind of you to come with me.” “Pull yer (= your) big skull in, will yer? Not doin’ it fer (= for) you. Me an’ Ede ‘aven’t ‘ad a holiday since we went fishin’ down at Ulladulla. Five years ago that was. (Culotta’s “Cop This Lot”, chapter 1)

pull your head (skull) in = shut up or mind your own business (Urban Dictionary)

Thank you for your efforts
excaelis
Posted: Monday, September 13, 2010 1:04:24 PM

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This looks like an Australian idiom, so Tov. or one the other antipodeans might have the best idea. I think, however, that the phrase means ' don't be stupid' or 'smarten up', rather than ' mind your own business'.
saintvivant1
Posted: Monday, September 13, 2010 9:21:36 PM
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I think it might mean don't have such a big ego, or "big head" as it is known in America. The message is don't flatter yourself.
excaelis
Posted: Monday, September 13, 2010 9:22:57 PM

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saintvivant1 wrote:
I think it might mean don't have such a big ego, or "big head" as it is known in America. The message is don't flatter yourself.


Sounds better than my idea. Applause
Romany
Posted: Monday, September 13, 2010 11:08:34 PM
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No, it doesn't have anything to do with ego, ...exactly as the Urban Dictionary says, it means Shut Up.

"Ah, give us a go, mate."
"Arrgh, you pull yer 'ead in y'silly ole bugger" + an affectionate exchange between two good friends. (Translation:- "Oh! May I have a turn?"
"Oh shut up, you silly old thing.")

However vil, as I remember it, Culotto explains what all the phrases mean during the book. So keep at it and you'll understand. Also, he put out a book called "Talkin' Strine" which is like an Urban Dictionary of Australian English.

I take my hat off to you (I commend you) though, for reading a book written in colloquial Australian because it must be very confusing and strange. Hey, I am an English speaker, but Aussie slang often completely bewilders me
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