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dry cleaning Options
lexx
Posted: Sunday, September 12, 2010 3:03:16 PM
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Joined: 7/9/2010
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Location: a bit north
do you think it would be ok to just spray water with a little bit of soap to a previously dry cleaned items?

i have a coat which i haven't washed since i bought it. but since i read that chemicals they use in dry cleaning can be harmful on your health, i decided not to dry clean it if the need arises. i'll just wash it gently, like spray water with soap instead?

would that be ok? anybody has tried this before?

Anxious
excaelis
Posted: Sunday, September 12, 2010 6:01:55 PM

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Joined: 6/30/2010
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Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
You run the risk of leaving a watermark, especially on silk.
Babezy
Posted: Sunday, September 12, 2010 7:01:46 PM
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Location: United States
They have home dry cleaning kits (in the US, at least) which operate in the dryer. I've tried one and it worked fine. The chemicals are obviouly a lot less dangerous. I haven't had to deal with a seriously dirty item, though. Maybe the home kits are less effective for that.
Tovarish
Posted: Sunday, September 12, 2010 8:02:03 PM
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Location: Booligal, New South Wales, Australia
An 'old fashioned' way was to press the garment, ie heavy cloth, not silk.
Dampen a lint free cloth, a hankie or a tea towell and press with a steam iron over the clothing.

As it drys, keep re-wetting the hankie.

No chemicals only extra steam.

I have never owned a dryer, too much electricity.
excaelis
Posted: Sunday, September 12, 2010 9:14:48 PM

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Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Tovarish wrote:

I have never owned a dryer, too much electricity.


Try living without one through a Canadian winter my friend, and you'll be using power like a time-travelling DeLorean, believe me. When it's -30 outside warm socks and undies are a gift from the gods ! Dancing
Tovarish
Posted: Sunday, September 12, 2010 9:23:09 PM
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Joined: 9/2/2009
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Location: Booligal, New South Wales, Australia
excaelis, we make up for the usage in the summer, attempting not to slow roast.

No need for a dryer out here, I have a rotary clothsline in the garden, there wouldnt be more that two days a year where I have to put cloths in front of the natural gas heater.

My son in law spent last year in Canada at the mines, your cold conditions are hard for us Aussie so comprehend.

srirr
Posted: Monday, September 13, 2010 2:38:16 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 12/29/2009
Posts: 8,507
Neurons: 484,288
lexx wrote:
do you think it would be ok to just spray water with a little bit of soap to a previously dry cleaned items?
i have a coat which i haven't washed since i bought it. but since i read that chemicals they use in dry cleaning can be harmful on your health, i decided not to dry clean it if the need arises. i'll just wash it gently, like spray water with soap instead?
would that be ok? anybody has tried this before?
Anxious


Some fabric are better to be dry cleaned. They may get water marks if washed with water. If you have not tried washing your coat with water before, I would suggest you not to do it. Why take a risk?

I remember, my sister had a dress which was very much like cotton. She always got it dry washed. Once she got some water spilled on it accidentally. The cloth got marks and spots. It looked weired.
redgriffin
Posted: Monday, September 13, 2010 11:28:09 AM
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Joined: 9/3/2010
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Location: Portland, Oregon, United States
I would check with the dry cleaners in your area as to the chemicals used. I believe that they were changed in 2006 by law. as for Spot cleaning go to your clothes detergent aisle of your supermarket or drugstore and get a product that allows you to dry clean in your dryer one product id Dryel they are good for spot cleaning and general lite cleaning of clothing.
RuthP
Posted: Monday, September 13, 2010 12:19:45 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/2/2009
Posts: 5,408
Neurons: 87,618
Location: Drain, Oregon, United States
"Green" dry-cleaning

There are three potential problems with water-washing something marked "dry-clean only".

1.) As mentioned, some fabrics water-spot. Some silks are a good example of this, though most of today's silks can be washed. You test for this by using a hidden spot (a hem is good) and soaking a small spot. (Take that part of the hem down while you do this, so there is no chance of affecting the outside of the coat.) While the spot is soaking wet try pressing a clean white cloth against it. If there is color transfer, the dye is not stable in water; don't wash. If there is no transfer, let the spot dry completely and see if there is any evidence of a change in color. If there is any change, don't wash. If no change, a cold-water hand wash is fine.

2.) Water, especially hot water and especially with agitation will cause some fabrics to shrink. Some wools are particularly bad about this. They felt, and unlike cotton, it is not possible to re-wet and stretch them once shrunk. That said, most wools can be washed in cold water (test color-fastness as in 1 first) by placing them flat in a bathtub already filled with cold water and pressing gently on the garment. A mild cleaner intended for wool may be used. To rinse, drain the tub and refill without running water over the garment; just let it fill up gently around the coat. Press the garment gently to remove the soap and repeat as necessary.

3.) And this is the worst one: The interfacing in some tailored garments, e.g. suit jackets or outer coats, is now glued-in rather than sewn-in. Some of the glues are not water-stable. If this is the case, the fashion-fabric (what you see as the fabric of the garment) will come loose from the interfacing while in the water. Usually, there is enough glue left for everything to stick back together, but unfortunately there will be little bubbles between the fashion fabric and the interfacing. It is usually not possible to fix this without taking the garment apart, removing the offending facing and replacing it, and re-sewing. Sometimes, if it isn't too severe, one can press-out the problem.

If this is a valuable garment, I'd recommend taking it to a dry cleaner. See the link above for some questions you might wish to ask. For all that I've said above, I dry clean almost nothing and wash almost everything I own, regardless of the tag.
Ray41
Posted: Thursday, August 16, 2012 7:20:51 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/9/2010
Posts: 1,937
Neurons: 45,980
Location: Orange, New South Wales, Australia
As most dry-cleaning agents, such as white spirits,etc. are volatile, I would be very careful about using them in a drier or washing machine.Anxious
It is not uncommon for people who have partners that work in greasy/oily conditions (mechanics/engineers) to use solvents such as petrol to remove/loosen stains prior to washing. There is enough residual vapour, even if overalls, etc. are submersed in water, to create an explosion if the machine has a short [electrical spark].
If, of course the, product used 'states that it is safe to use in a drier', then, that would obviously be okay.Pray

It would help if you could look at the label to see what the coat is made of, post that information so forum members have a better idea on how to offer advise.Think
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