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Great Scrabble words Options
Betsy D.
Posted: Thursday, March 19, 2009 9:24:15 AM
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I'm a Scrabble freak. I learn of lots of words I would never have dreamed were legit. I saw two in the news yesterday, under the headline "Scrabble to add new words to official dictionary". They are "za" (slang for pizza - dubious, I know) and "qi" which I've used many times not knowing the meaning. Turns out it refers to "a body's vital life force".

What are some of your favorite Scrabble words?
MiTziGo
Posted: Thursday, March 19, 2009 12:09:31 PM
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Love "qat," which allows you to use a "q" without having a "u" in your hand.
Drew
Posted: Thursday, March 19, 2009 2:24:48 PM
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Nice call on the Q-words. I always feel handicapped having a Q without a U.
LiteBrite
Posted: Thursday, March 19, 2009 4:31:58 PM
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The greek letter "xi" is very helpful, esp. since you can usually pick up the vowel from the board and fit the word in small spots (well, obviously). Better when you can stick the X in a spot that is next to an I and above another I, to get double points from one letter. Best when it's on a triple letter score.

Any suggestions for J? A two- or three-letter scrabble word starting w/ J would be handy.
NicoleR
Posted: Thursday, March 19, 2009 8:38:45 PM
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"Jay" or "joy" can usually yield a fair amount of points.
Betsy D.
Posted: Thursday, March 19, 2009 10:55:01 PM
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MichalG wrote:
Love "qat," which allows you to use a "q" without having a "u" in your hand.


Right! Forgot about that one... Qat - yes, good one! Wikipedia defines it as "the principal god in the oral mythology of the Banks Islands, a small archipelago of northern Vanuatu, Melanesia".
Betsy D.
Posted: Thursday, March 19, 2009 10:59:48 PM
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LiteBrite wrote:
The greek letter "xi" is very helpful, esp. since you can usually pick up the vowel from the board and fit the word in small spots (well, obviously). Better when you can stick the X in a spot that is next to an I and above another I, to get double points from one letter. Best when it's on a triple letter score.

Any suggestions for J? A two- or three-letter scrabble word starting w/ J would be handy.


Ah, xi... very handy word indeed. And then there's xu, which has a number of meanings, one of which is a Vietnamese unit of currency.

"Jo" is a word that Scrabble's dictionary defines as "a sweetheart". I believe it will also accept "joe".
Betsy D.
Posted: Friday, March 20, 2009 10:19:36 AM
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[quote=LiteBrite]The greek letter "xi" is very helpful, esp. since you can usually pick up the vowel from the board and fit the word in small spots (well, obviously). Better when you can stick the X in a spot that is next to an I and above another I, to get double points from one letter. Best when it's on a triple letter score.

Any suggestions for J? A two- or three-letter scrabble word starting w/ J would be handy. [/quote

Oh...and "jun" is another - is a Korean monetary unit.
Joseph Glantz
Posted: Saturday, March 21, 2009 8:06:59 AM
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If I remember correctly "jo" means friend. While "joe" is a proper name there's also the alternative meaning for coffee - a cup of joe. Might be good to check the dictionary first
TB
Posted: Tuesday, August 18, 2009 10:49:42 PM
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MichalG wrote:
Love "qat," which allows you to use a "q" without having a "u" in your hand.


Here are a few more words containing "q" without "u":

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_English_words_containing_Q_not_followed_by_U
TYSON
Posted: Tuesday, August 18, 2009 11:04:48 PM
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My fav is "aa". Perfect for using-up those unwanted extra vowels.
Here is the definition from this very site:

aa (ää)
A type of lava having a rough, jagged surface. It is relatively slow moving in its molten state, advancing in the form of massive blocks with fissured and angular surfaces that ride on a viscous interior. The blocks range in size between the size of a football and the size of a house. See Note at pahoehoe.
or
a·a or a'a (ää)
n.
Lava having a rough surface.

[Hawaiian 'a', to burn, aa.]
dualchakram2
Posted: Tuesday, September 7, 2010 7:50:06 PM
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Any great words you can use commonly? For when your like this Brick wall or Think Trying to a decent word.

Also, almost all of the greek words go great with scrabble with the exception of stuff like delta (5 pnts.), or iota (4 pnts.)
excaelis
Posted: Wednesday, September 8, 2010 6:53:24 PM

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Faqir is a good one to have up your sleeve, along with adz and ai.
DarkMoon
Posted: Wednesday, September 8, 2010 7:45:39 PM

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When I play Scrabble with my family or friends, despite the rules and a Scrabble's dictionary, we all usually agree that only words from a language dictionary are acceptable. Needless to say, it's our game, and our own established laws, even though they are a bit distorted. ;-)
excaelis
Posted: Wednesday, September 8, 2010 7:49:32 PM

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DarkMoon wrote:
When I play Scrabble with my family or friends, despite the rules and a Scrabble's dictionary, we all usually agree that only words from a language dictionary are acceptable. Needless to say, it's our game, and our own established laws, even though they are a bit distorted. ;-)


With you on the language dictionary thing. A real printed one. The Official Scrabble Dictionary ought to be ashamed of itself. Shame on you
memphis jailer
Posted: Saturday, December 11, 2010 5:26:41 PM
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i had a game with a friend of mine she put down sox ..... i had always thought that it was just used for the white sox and red sox .... nope .... it's in the dictionary .... but i'm still stubborn enough to not use it when given a chance
Blooper
Posted: Monday, December 13, 2010 4:39:33 PM
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I used to play scrabble online, but not anymore since i found people cheating.
kitten
Posted: Monday, December 13, 2010 5:46:06 PM
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Joseph Glantz wrote:
If I remember correctly "jo" means friend. While "joe" is a proper name there's also the alternative meaning for coffee - a cup of joe. Might be good to check the dictionary first


Hello, Anxious

Yes, it is used for coffee and has been for over a century.

joe (j)
n. Informal
Brewed coffee.

[Short for (old black) joe, military slang for coffee, from the title of a song by Stephen Foster.]

Published in 1860. I saw the sheet music and read the lyrics and it doesn't say anything about coffee. But working in a coffe shop, I use the phrase "joe to go."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Old_Black_Joe


peace out, >^,,^<
ryanjanus
Posted: Sunday, December 26, 2010 3:09:51 PM
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@DarkMoon and others: I'd be careful with that, though, because depending on which dictionary you use, there may often be contractions, slang, foreign words, proper names, acronyms or other abbreviations that aren't even in the Scrabble dictionary. There is probably no perfect solution.

That said, it's true that Scrabble's rules seem a bit arbitrary at times. Like for instance, when dealing with acronyms, "radar" is acceptable, but "hiv" is not. Maybe that's because people actually spell out "H-I-V" instead of saying "hiv," like "hive" with a short vowel. It also says no abbreviations, but words like ad, ab, sax and za are allowed. Maybe there's some fine line when it crosses over into becoming a word of its own. Proper names aren't allowed, but "xerox" is in the dictionary because of its frequency of use as a substitute for "photocopy." "Kleenex," however, which you would think should be in the Scrabble dictionary for the same reason, is not. Nor is "google," which now appears in most Webster and Oxford dictionaries (and even this one) as a verb for "search for on the internet." Go figure.

DarkMoon wrote:
When I play Scrabble with my family or friends, despite the rules and a Scrabble's dictionary, we all usually agree that only words from a language dictionary are acceptable. Needless to say, it's our game, and our own established laws, even though they are a bit distorted. ;-)
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