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neferkitty
Posted: Wednesday, July 22, 2015 9:24:07 AM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 3/26/2015
Posts: 23
Neurons: 2,565
Hi everyone!

First of all, I've check this word from the dictionaries and it is defined as :

http://www.thefreedictionary.com/endpoint

BUT, I am confused about the ''endpoint'' about which I read on a text.

e.g.

''Rationale for efficacy endpoints''

''New onset AF was an adjudicated endpoint based on patient ECG data''

I don't understand, there is no meaning about a point or AF = atrial fibrilation so it can not be a final goal (it is a negative thing and it can't be aimed).

What does endpoint mean in those sentences?

Thank you.

Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, July 22, 2015 10:18:27 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 34,427
Neurons: 228,163
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hello neferkitty.

I'm afraid you have drifted into a totally different language here.

This type of use for 'endpoint' is not really English, it is known as 'corporate-speak' or 'office-speak'. In English, the word used would be 'result', outcome' or maybe 'effect' or 'upshot', depending on context. In this sentence, it seems like a result.

"New onset AF was an adjudicated endpoint based on patient ECG data", to me, means
"The EEG data shows that the result was an onset of atrial fibrillation." or
"From the EEG data, I think atrial fibrillation set in."

The text is, in English, totally meaningless. It is three nouns with a preposition.
rationale - The fundamental reasons for something
for - in order to
efficacy - the quality of being successful and effective
endpoints - final goals

"Rationale for efficacy endpoints" means only "The fundamental reasons in order to the quality of being successful final goals." which is not a sentence and is unintelligible in English.
JL-2
Posted: Wednesday, July 22, 2015 12:03:14 PM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 7/22/2015
Posts: 7
Neurons: 212
Good morning.

I agree with Drag0nspeaker that "Rationale for efficacy endpoints" is not a sentence, but not that it is completely meaningless or unintelligible — it just needs come context.

It looks to me to be a heading or subheading in a research paper or report. Because neferkitty's other example is from a medical text, lets assume ''Rationale for efficacy endpoints'' is also from a medical text.

Assuming this medical context, I think it has two possible meanings: "The reason [a procedure or treatment] is no longer effective at a certain point [in time or process]"(eg. the reason why you'd stop CPR after X minutes with no patient response) or "The reason [a treatment] stops being effective at a certain point" (eg. the reason why an ointment stops aiding in healing a skin rash after a certain number of applications).

Again, these explanations are assuming context not provided in the original post. Hope they help.

-- JL-2
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, July 23, 2015 3:23:08 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 34,427
Neurons: 228,163
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Thanks JL-2.

The main difficulty here is that your explanation does not make sense, considering the definitions of the words.

rationale - The fundamental reasons for something
efficacy - the quality of being successful and effective
endpoints - final goals

"The reason [something] is no longer effective at a certain point [in time or process]"

"Rationale" and "efficacy" fit fine, but "final goals" is not the same as "at a certain point" (or even "at the last point in time").

If one meant what you say (as a title or something), why not say it? It could be as "The reason [a procedure or treatment] is no longer effective at a certain point [in time or process]" or "Why is stops working" or "Reasons for time-limits".

neferkitty
Posted: Friday, July 24, 2015 7:37:27 AM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 3/26/2015
Posts: 23
Neurons: 2,565
Thank you to both of you :)

I've found the meaning of it from a terminological catalog as ''clinical enpoints''.

So it has a special medical meaning yes :)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clinical_endpoint
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, July 24, 2015 8:57:52 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 34,427
Neurons: 228,163
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Thanks Neferkitty - that makes sense in the longer phrase:

"New onset AF was an adjudicated endpoint based on patient ECG data."
In more mundane (non-abbreviated) English:
"The point at which atrial fibrillation recurred (as recognised from the patient's EEG data) was adjudicated to be a clinical endpoint for this research trial."

This sort of shortened communication is normal amongst professionals in any field - understandable amongst themselves but mysterious to outsiders. It is called 'jargon' in English.

However, I still cannot understand the text: "Rationale for efficacy endpoints".
Even using the meaning "clinical endpoint", it is still just a bunch of nouns.

"The fundamental reasons in order to the quality of being successful final results expected of a clinical trial." ??
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