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Daemon
Posted: Saturday, September 30, 2017 12:00:00 AM
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Taklamakan

One of the largest sandy deserts in the world, the Taklamakan Desert in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region of China is approximately 600 miles (965 km) across, with an area of 105,000 square miles (272,000 sq km). It is crossed at its northern and southern edges by two branches of the Silk Road, whose travelers sought to avoid the arid wasteland. Archeological digs in the Taklamakan's sand cover, which is 1,000 feet (300 m) thick in some places, have revealed what 4,000-year-old discoveries? More...
KSPavan
Posted: Saturday, September 30, 2017 2:04:48 AM

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Article of the Day
Taklamakan
One of the largest sandy deserts in the world, the Taklamakan Desert in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region of China is approximately 600 miles (965 km) across, with an area of 105,000 square miles (272,000 sq km). It is crossed at its northern and southern edges by two branches of the Silk Road, whose travelers sought to avoid the arid wasteland.
KSPavan
Posted: Saturday, September 30, 2017 2:05:02 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/28/2015
Posts: 2,195
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Location: Kolkata, Bengal, India
Article of the Day
Taklamakan
One of the largest sandy deserts in the world, the Taklamakan Desert in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region of China is approximately 600 miles (965 km) across, with an area of 105,000 square miles (272,000 sq km). It is crossed at its northern and southern edges by two branches of the Silk Road, whose travelers sought to avoid the arid wasteland.
monamagda
Posted: Saturday, September 30, 2017 8:31:23 AM

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Location: Bogotá, Bogota D.C., Colombia

Secret Ancient World Buried Under The Vast Takla Makan Desert

Precious ancient relics are hidden deep under the “Sea of Death”, or the Taklamakan desert.

In the late 1980’s, several well-preserved mummies were discovered in the Taklamakan desert.

The perfectly well-preserved mummies are estimated to be at least 3000 years-old. The corpses reveal that the people had long reddish-blond hair, European features and didn’t appear to be the ancestors of modern-day Chinese people. Archaeologists now think they may have been the citizens of an ancient civilization that existed at the crossroads between China and Europe

It would seem an entire secret ancient world is hidden beneath the sand. What more surprising discoveries will archaeologists encounter at this dangerous and mysterious place?

In 2003, during a dig at the “creek tomb”, another well-kept female corpse was found. Also estimated at over 4,000 years old, the corpse still had beautiful facial features, thick eyelashes, and a visible smile. Her beauty once again stunned the world, 24 years after the discovery of Loulan beauty. A funeral system involving “reproduction worship” was also revealed.”




The Beauty of Loulan is a mummy found in 1980 in the long-abandoned city of Loulan near the east edge of the Taklamakan Desert. She is 3800 years old! She has high cheekbones, a high bridged nose and blonde hair. She is 162 centimeters tall — that's 5'2'', for those upholding the old Imperial system of units. She died sometime in her 40s, and she's dressed in a red robe, her hair crisply braided. Over 200 mummies of this sort have been found in and near the Taklamakan Desert. DNA testing shows that they have haplogroup R1a Y-DNA, which is characteristic of East-Central Europe, Central Asia and the Indus Valley.

http://www.ancientpages.com/2014/05/21/secret-ancient-world-buried-under-the-vast-takla-makan-desert/



raghd muhi al-deen
Posted: Saturday, September 30, 2017 9:14:32 AM

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Location: Baghdad, Mayorality of Baghdad, Iraq
Taklimakan
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Taklamakan Desert
Taklamakan Desert
Taklamakan desert.jpg
View of the Taklamakan desert
Chinese name
Simplified Chinese 塔克拉玛干沙漠
Traditional Chinese 塔克拉瑪干沙漠
Transcriptions
Mandarin
- Hanyu Pinyin Tǎkèlāmǎgān Shāmò
- Wade–Giles T'a3-k'e4-la1-ma3-kan1 Sha1-mo4
Uyghur name
Uyghur
تەكلىماكان قۇملۇقى
Transcriptions
- Latin Yëziqi Täklimakan qumluqi
- Yengi Yezik̡ Təklimakan ⱪumluⱪi
- Siril Yëziqi Təклимакан қумлуқи

The Taklamakan Desert, also known as Taklimakan and Teklimakan, is a desert in the southwest portion of the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region in northwest China. It is bounded by the Kunlun Mountains to the south, the desert Pamir Mountains and Tian Shan (ancient Mount Imeon) to the west and north, and the Gobi Desert to the east.

The name is probably an Uyghur borrowing of Arabic tark, "to leave alone/out/behind, relinquish, abandon" + makan, "place".[1][2] Another plausible explanation is that it is derived from Turki taqlar makan, which means "the place of ruins".[3] Popular accounts claim that Takla Makan means "go in and you will never come out". It may also mean "The point of no return" or "The Desert of Death".[4]

The Taklamakan Desert Ecoregion is a Chinese ecoregion of the Deserts and xeric shrublands Biome.[citation needed]
Geography
Taklamakan Desert and Tarim Basin
Taklamakan by NASA World Wind

The Taklamakan Desert has an area of 337,000 km2 (130,116 sq. mi.),[5] and includes the Tarim Basin, which is 1,000 kilometres (620 mi) long and 400 kilometres (250 mi) wide. It is crossed at its northern and at its southern edge by two branches of the Silk Road as travelers sought to avoid the arid wasteland.[6] It is the world's second largest shifting sand desert with about 85% made up of shifting sand dunes[7] ranking 18th in size in a ranking of the world's largest non-polar deserts.[8]

Some geographers and ecologists prefer to regard the Taklamakan Desert as separate and independent from the Gobi Desert region to its east.

In recent years, the People's Republic of China has constructed a cross-desert highway that links the cities of Hotan (on the southern edge) and Luntai (on the northern edge). In recent years, the desert has expanded in some areas, its sands enveloping farms and villages as a result of desertification.
Climate
Desert life near Yarkand
Sand Dunes captured by NASA's Landsat-7

Because it lies in the rain shadow of the Himalayas,Taklamakan is a paradigmatic cold desert climate. Given its relative proximity with the cold to frigid air masses in Siberia, extreme lows are recorded in wintertime, sometimes well below −20 °C (−4 °F). During the 2008 Chinese winter storms episode, the Taklamakan was reported to be covered for the first time in its entirety with a thin layer of snow reaching 4 centimetres (1.6 in), with a temperature of −26.1 °C (−15 °F) in some observatories.[9]

Its extreme inland position, virtually in the very heartland of Asia and thousands of kilometres from any open body of water, accounts for the cold character of its nights even during summertime.
Oasis
The Molcha (Moleqie) River forms a vast alluvial fan at the southern border of the Taklamakan Desert, as it leaves the Altyn-Tagh mountains and enters the desert in the western part of the Qiemo County. The left side appears blue from water flowing in many streams. The picture is taken in May, when the river is full with the snow/glacier meltwater. [1]

There is very little water in the desert and it is hazardous to cross. Merchant caravans on the Silk Road would stop for relief at the thriving oasis towns.[10]

The key oasis towns, watered by rainfall from the mountains, were Kashgar, Marin, Niya, Yarkand, and Khotan (Hetian) to the south, Kuqa and Turpan in the north, and Loulan and Dunhuang in the east.[6] Now many, such as Marin and Gaochang, are ruined cities in sparsely inhabited areas in the Xinjiang Autonomous Region of the People's Republic of China.[11]

The archeological treasures found in its sand-buried ruins point to Tocharian, early Hellenistic, Indian, and Buddhist influences. Its treasures and dangers have been vividly described by Aurel Stein, Sven Hedin, Albert von Le Coq, and Paul Pelliot.[6] Mummies, some 4000 years old, have been found in the region. They show the wide range of peoples who have passed through.

Later, the Taklamakan was inhabited by Turkic peoples. Starting with the Tang Dynasty, the Chinese periodically extended their control to the oasis cities of the Taklamakan in order to control the important silk route trade across Central Asia. Periods of Chinese rule were interspersed with rule by Turkic, Mongol and Tibetan peoples. The present population consists largely of Turkic Uyghur people.

with my pleasure
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