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I can resist everything except temptation. Options
Daemon
Posted: Friday, September 29, 2017 12:00:00 AM
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I can resist everything except temptation.

Oscar Wilde (1854-1900)
Mehrdad77
Posted: Friday, September 29, 2017 1:22:16 AM

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I generally avoid temptation unless I can't resist it.






Mae West
Mehrdad77
Posted: Friday, September 29, 2017 1:22:59 AM

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Why resist temptation? There will always be more.






Don Herold
Mehrdad77
Posted: Friday, September 29, 2017 1:24:17 AM

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We gain the strength of the temptation we resist.






Ralph Waldo Emerson
KSPavan
Posted: Friday, September 29, 2017 2:24:37 AM

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Quotation of the Day

I can resist everything except temptation.

Oscar Wilde (1854-1900)
ibj_ldn
Posted: Friday, September 29, 2017 7:02:45 AM

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(...) This is how the world ends (...) - song "In a whisper" by Norah Jones
ibj_ldn
Posted: Friday, September 29, 2017 7:03:28 AM

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Great quotes, Mehrdad77 Applause
monamagda
Posted: Friday, September 29, 2017 8:16:37 AM

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Context from:Lady Windermere's Fan

ACT I

Lord Darlington


Comment:(Lord Darlington shows his struggle between being good and bad. This quote also shows his intentions for Lady Windermere and how he wants her. Him going after a married woman is not a good thing and he knows that. He goes through this play wanting things he cannot have.)

Now, Lord Darlington.
[Rising and crossing R., front of him.]
Don't stir, I am merely going to finish my flowers.
[Goes to table R.C.]

LORD DARLINGTON [Rising and moving chair.]
And I must say I think you are very hard on modern life, Lady Windermere. Of course there is much against it, I admit. Most women, for instance, nowadays, are rather mercenary.

LADY WINDERMERE Don't talk about such people.

LORD DARLINGTON Well then, setting aside mercenary people, who, of course, are dreadful, do you think seriously that women who have committed what the world calls a fault should never be forgiven?

LADY WINDERMERE [Standing at table.]
I think they should never be forgiven.

LORD DARLINGTON And men? Do you think that there should be the same laws for men as there are for women?

LADY WINDERMERE Certainly!

LORD DARLINGTON I think life too complex a thing to be settled by these hard and fast rules.

LADY WINDERMERE If we had 'these hard and fast rules,' we should find life much more simple.

LORD DARLINGTON You allow of no exceptions?

LADY WINDERMERE None!

LORD DARLINGTON Ah, what a fascinating Puritan you are, Lady Windermere!

LADY WINDERMERE The adjective was unnecessary, Lord Darlington.

LORD DARLINGTON I couldn't help it. I can resist everything except temptation.

LADY WINDERMERE You have the modern affectation of weakness.

LORD DARLINGTON [Looking at her.]
It's only an affectation, Lady Windermere.

Bully_rus
Posted: Friday, September 29, 2017 1:29:19 PM
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Daemon wrote:
I can resist everything except temptation.

Oscar Wilde (1854-1900)


If you can't resist temptation, then you can't resist nothing.
mudbudda669
Posted: Friday, September 29, 2017 1:44:51 PM

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new quotes are needed
Verbatim
Posted: Friday, September 29, 2017 9:26:00 PM
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[quote=Daemon]
I can resist everything except temptation.

Oscar Wilde (1854-1900)[/quote

All that's left to resist except temptation,
Not worth the effort to avoid damnation.

raghd muhi al-deen
Posted: Friday, September 29, 2017 10:32:29 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/19/2017
Posts: 511
Neurons: 49,569
Location: Baghdad, Mayorality of Baghdad, Iraq

Oscar Wilde
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Wikipedia.
Wilde, Oscar (Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde), 1854–1900, Irish author and wit, b. Dublin. He is most famous for his sophisticated, brilliantly witty plays, which were the first since the comedies of Sheridan and Goldsmith to have both dramatic and literary merit. He studied at Trinity College, Dublin, and at Magdalen College, Oxford, where he distinguished himself for his scholarship and wit, and also for his elegant eccentricity in dress, tastes, and manners. Influenced by the aesthetic teachings of Walter Pater

and John Ruskin

, Wilde became the center of a group glorifying beauty for itself alone, and he was famously satirized (with other exponents of "art for art's sake") in Punch and in Gilbert and Sullivan's operetta Patience. His first published work, Poems (1881), was well received. The next year he lectured to great acclaim in the United States, where his drama Vera (1883) was produced. In 1884 he married Constance Lloyd, and they had two sons, Cyril and Vyvyan.

Later he began writing for and editing periodicals, but his active literary career began with the publication of Lord Arthur Savile's Crime and Other Stories (1891) and two collections of fairy tales, The Happy Prince (1888) and The House of Pomegranates (1892). In 1891 his novel Picture of Dorian Gray appeared. A tale of horror, it depicts the corruption of a beautiful young man pursuing an ideal of sensual indulgence and moral indifference; although he himself remains young and handsome, his portrait becomes ugly, reflecting his degeneration.

Wilde's stories and essays were well received, but his creative genius found its highest expression in his plays—Lady Windermere's Fan (1892), A Woman of No Importance (1893), An Ideal Husband (1895), and his masterpiece, The Importance of Being Earnest (1895), which were all extremely clever and filled with pithy epigrams and paradoxes. Wilde explained away their lack of depth by saying that he put his genius into his life and only his talent into his books. He also wrote two historical tragedies, The Duchess of Padua (1892) and Salomé (1893).

In 1891, Wilde met and quite soon became intimate with the considerably younger, handsome, and dissolute Lord Alfred Douglas (nicknamed "Bosie"). Soon the marquess of Queensberry, Douglas's father, began railing against Wilde and later wrote him a note accusing him of homosexual practices. Foolishly, Wilde brought action for libel against the marquess and was himself charged with homosexual offenses under the Criminal Law Amendment, found guilty, and sentenced (1895) to prison for two years. His experiences in jail inspired his most famous poem, The Ballad of Reading Gaol (1898), and the apology published by his literary executor as De Profundis (1905). Released from prison in 1897, Wilde found himself a complete social outcast in England and, plagued by ill health and bankruptcy, lived in France under an assumed name until his death.
Bibliography

See his collected works, ed. by R. Ross (1969); letters, ed. by R. Hart-Davis (1962); complete letters, ed. by M. Holland and R. Hart-Davis (2000); notebooks, ed. by P. E. Smith 2d and M. S. Helfant (1989); Oscar Wilde in America: The Interviews (2010), ed. by M. Hofer and G. Scharnhorst; biographies by R. Ellman (1988), P. Raby (1988), J. Pearce (2005), N. McKenna (2006), R. Stach (2 vol., 2010, tr. 2013), R. Morris, Jr. (2012), and S. Friedländer (2013); studies by M. Fido (1974), N. Kohl (1989), G. Woodcock (1989), T. Wright (2009), J. Bristow, ed. (2013), and D. M. Friedman, (2014).
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/


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