The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

Shel Silverstein (1932) Options
Daemon
Posted: Monday, September 25, 2017 12:00:00 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/7/2009
Posts: 21,726
Neurons: 65,181
Location: Inside Farlex computers
Shel Silverstein (1932)

Silverstein was an American cartoonist, children's author, poet, songwriter, and playwright. Often compared to Dr. Seuss, he wrote and illustrated innovative books of verse for children, including Where the Sidewalk Ends, A Light in the Attic, and The Giving Tree. His quirky verse, which touches on common childhood anxieties and wishes, is credited with helping youngsters develop an appreciation for poetry. What hit song, performed by Johnny Cash, was written by Silverstein? More...
monamagda
Posted: Monday, September 25, 2017 8:17:07 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/4/2014
Posts: 5,627
Neurons: 3,627,821
Location: Bogotá, Bogota D.C., Colombia

"A Boy Named Sue" is a song written by Shel Silverstein, made popular by Johnny Cash. He recorded the song live at California's San Quentin State Prison at a concert on February 24, 1969. Cash also performed the song (with comical variations on the original performance) in December 1969 at Madison Square Garden.


Lyrics
Well my daddy left home when I was three
And he didn't leave much to Ma and me
Just this old guitar and an empty bottle of booze
Now, I don't blame him 'cause he run and hid
But the meanest thing that he ever did
Was before he left, he went and named me "Sue"
Well, he must o' thought that is quite a joke
And it got a lot of laughs from a' lots of folk
It seems I had to fight my whole life through
Some gal would giggle and I'd get red
And some guy'd laugh and I'd bust his head
I tell ya, life ain't easy for a boy named "Sue"
................

See more : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WOHPuY88Ry4
raghd muhi al-deen
Posted: Monday, September 25, 2017 9:15:26 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/19/2017
Posts: 511
Neurons: 49,569
Location: Baghdad, Mayorality of Baghdad, Iraq
Shel Silverstein
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.
Shel Silverstein
Shel Silverstein
Ssilverstein.jpg
Born Sheldon Allan Silverstein
September 25, 1930
Chicago, Illinois
Died May 10, 1999 (aged 68)
Key West, Florida[1]
Occupation Author
Poet
Cartoonist
Songwriter
Playwright
Nationality American
Genres Children's fiction
Black comedy
Playwright
Notable work(s) Where the Sidewalk Ends (1974)
The Giving Tree (1965)
"A Boy Named Sue" (1969)
Signature

Sheldon Allan "Shel" Silverstein (September 25, 1930 – May 10, 1999),[1][2] was an American poet, singer-songwriter, cartoonist, screenwriter and author of children's books. He styled himself as Uncle Shelby in his children's books. Translated into more than 30 languages, his books have sold over 20 million copies.[2]
Personal life

Shel Silverstein was born into a Jewish family and had one brother, Tyler Mahns. He attended Roosevelt High School and, later, the University of Illinois, from which he was expelled. He then attended Chicago Academy of Fine Arts and Roosevelt University for three years, until in 1953 when he was drafted into the United States Army. He served in Japan and Korea. He had a girlfriend named Susan with whom he had one daughter, Shoshanna, on June 30, 1970. The child died in 1982 of a cerebral aneurysm. He also had a son named Mathew (b. circa 1984).[3][4]

Shel Silverstein died on May 10, 1999. He died in his home in Key West Florida from a massive heart attack. He was discovered in a bedroom by the maids who had arrived to clean. He died at age 68. Silverstein is buried in Westlawn Cemetery in Chicago.
Cartoons

Silverstein began drawing at age 12 by tracing the works of Al Capp.[5] He told Publishers Weekly: "When I was a kid—12 to 14, around there—I would much rather have been a good baseball player or a hit with the girls, but I couldn't play ball. I couldn't dance. Luckily, the girls didn't want me. Not much I could do about that. So I started to draw and to write. I was also lucky that I didn't have anybody to copy, be impressed by. I had developed my own style; I was creating before I knew there was a Thurber, a Benchley, a Price and a Steinberg. I never saw their work till I was around 30. By the time I got to where I was attracting girls, I was already into work, and it was more important to me. Not that I wouldn't rather make love, but the work has become a habit."[6]
Shel Silverstein's Playboy travelogues were collected in 2007.

He was first published in the Roosevelt Torch (a student newspaper at Roosevelt University), where he studied English after leaving the Art Institute. During his tenure in the military, his cartoons were published in Pacific Stars and Stripes, where he had originally been assigned to do layouts and paste-up. His first book, Take Ten, a compilation of his military Take Ten cartoon series, was published by Pacific Stars and Stripes in 1955. He later said his time in college was a waste and would have been better spent traveling around the world meeting people.[7]

After returning to Chicago, Silverstein began submitting cartoons to magazines while also selling hot dogs at Chicago ballparks. His cartoons began appearing in Look, Sports Illustrated and This Week.[8]

Mass-market paperback readers across America were introduced to Silverstein in 1956 when Take Ten was reprinted by Ballantine Books as Grab Your Socks! The edition included a foreword by Bill Mauldin.

In 1957, Silverstein became one of the leading cartoonists in Playboy, which sent him around the world to create an illustrated travel journal with reports from far-flung locales. During the 1950s and 1960s, he produced 23 installments called "Shel Silverstein Visits..." as a feature for Playboy. Employing a sketchbook format with typewriter-styled captions, he documented his own experiences at such locations as a New Jersey nudist colony, the Chicago White Sox training camp, San Francisco's Haight-Ashbury district, Fire Island, Mexico, London, Paris, Spain and Africa. In a Swiss village, he drew himself complaining, "I'll give them 15 more minutes, and if nobody yodels, I'm going back to the hotel." These illustrated travel essays were collected by the publisher Fireside in Playboy's Silverstein Around the World, published in 2007 with a foreword by Hugh Hefner and an introduction by music journalist Mitch Myers.[9]

In a similar vein were his illustrations for John Sack's Report from Practically Nowhere (1959), a collection of humorous travel vignettes previously appearing in Playboy and other magazines.[10]
"Now here's my plan..."
"Now here's my plan...", Shel Silverstein's best known cartoon of the 1950s, became the title of his 1960 cartoon collection.

His best known cartoon of the 1950s was featured on the cover of his next cartoon collection, Now Here's My Plan: A Book of Futilities, which was published by Simon & Schuster in 1960. Silverstein biographer Lisa Rogak wrote:

The cartoon on the cover that provides the book's title would turn out to be one of his most famous and often-cited cartoons. In the cartoon, two prisoners are chained to the wall of a prison cell. Both their hands and feet are shackled. One says to the other, "Now here's my plan." Silverstein was both fascinated and distressed by the amount of analysis and commentary that almost immediately began to swirl around the cartoon. "A lot of people said it was a very pessimistic cartoon, which I don't think it is at all," he said. "There's a lot of hope even in a hopeless situation. They analyze it and question it. I did this cartoon because I had an idea about a funny situation about two guys."[2]

Silverstein's cartoons appeared in issues of Playboy from 1957 through the mid-1970s, and one of his Playboy features was expanded into Uncle Shelby's ABZ Book (Simon & Schuster, 1961), his first book of new, original material for adults. Because some of his material was unclear whether it was intended for adults or children, the 1985 reprint had a conspicuous cover label.
Children's books

Silverstein's editor at Harper & Row, Ursula Nordstrom, encouraged Silverstein to write children's poetry. Silverstein said that he never studied the poetry of others and therefore developed his own quirky style, laid back and conversational, occasionally employing profanity and slang. In the 1975 Publishers Weekly interview, he was asked how he came to do children's books:

He is a strong, well-muscled, fit-looking man who wears blue jeans and a big cowboy hat. Though he has to be into his 40s (he's a Korean War veteran), he is also totally in touch with the contemporary scene... How, an author-illustrator alone. Asked if he would change something he had produced on an editor's say-so, he answered with a flat "No." But he added: "Oh, I will take a suggestion for revision. I do eliminate certain things when I'm writing for children if I think only an adult will get the idea. Then I drop it, or save it. But editors messing with content? No." Had he been surprised by the astronomical record of The Giving Tree, his biggest seller to date and one of the most successful children's books in years? Another emphatic no. "What I do is good," he said. "I wouldn't let it out if I didn't think it was." It tells of a tree and the use a man makes of it. When he is a boy, he plays in the tree's branches and enjoys its luscious fruit. Later, he courts his love under the tree and uses some of its wood to build a house for his family. Years pass; the man is now old and alone. The tree lets him take its trunk to carve a boat from, and the man rows away. Finally he returns for the last time to sit and rest on the stump of the tree—all that's left of it.[6][11] But The Giving Tree, which has been selling steadily since it appeared almost 10 years ago and has been translated into French, is not his own favorite among his books. "I like Uncle Shelby's ABZ, A Giraffe and a Half, the sophisticated and the simple.

Otto Penzler, in his crime anthology Murder for Revenge (1998), commented on Silverstein's versatility:
“ The phrase "Renaissance man" tends to get overused these days, but apply it to Shel Silverstein and it practically begins to seem inadequate. Not only has he produced with seeming ease country music hits and popular songs, but he's been equally successful at turning his hand to poetry, short stories, plays, and children's books. Moreover, his whimsically hip fables, beloved by readers of all ages, have made him a stalwart of bestseller lists. A Light in the Attic, most remarkably, showed the kind of staying power on the New York Times chart—two years, to be precise—thought that most of the biggest names (John Grisham, Stephen King and Michael Crichton) have never equaled for their own blockbusters. His unmistakable illustrative style is another crucial element to his appeal. Just as no writer sounds like Shel, no other artist's vision is as delightfully, sophisticatingly cockeyed. One can only marvel that he makes the time to respond so kindly to his friends' requests. In the following work, let's be glad he did. Drawing on his characteristic passion for list making, he shows how the deed is not just in the wish but in the sublimation. ”

This anthology was the second in a series, which also included Murder for Love (1996) and Murder and Obsession (1999). All three anthologies included Silverstein contributions. He did not really care to conform to any sort of norm, but he did want to leave his mark for others to be inspired by, as he told Publishers Weekly:

I would hope that people, no matter what age, would find something to identify with in

with my pleasure
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines. Copyright © 2008-2017 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.