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"Yes, Virginia, There Is a Santa Claus" Editorial Is Published (1897) Options
Daemon
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"Yes, Virginia, There Is a Santa Claus" Editorial Is Published (1897)

In 1897, eight-year-old Virginia O'Hanlon of New York City asked her father if Santa Claus was real. When he suggested that "if you see it in The Sun, it's so," she wrote to the newspaper and asked. Editor Francis Pharcellus Church's lengthy, touching reply became one of the most reprinted newspaper editorials in US history. "Alas! how dreary would be the world if there were no Santa Claus. It would be as dreary as if there were no Virginias," wrote Church. What happened to Virginia? More...
KSPavan
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"Yes, Virginia, There Is a Santa Claus" Editorial Is Published (1897)
In 1897, eight-year-old Virginia O'Hanlon of New York City asked her father if Santa Claus was real. When he suggested that "if you see it in The Sun, it's so," she wrote to the newspaper and asked. Editor Francis Pharcellus Church's lengthy, touching reply became one of the most reprinted newspaper editorials in US history. "Alas! how dreary would be the world if there were no Santa Claus. It would be as dreary as if there were no Virginias," wrote Church.
KSPavan
Posted: Thursday, September 21, 2017 4:32:02 AM

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This Day in History
"Yes, Virginia, There Is a Santa Claus" Editorial Is Published (1897)
In 1897, eight-year-old Virginia O'Hanlon of New York City asked her father if Santa Claus was real. When he suggested that "if you see it in The Sun, it's so," she wrote to the newspaper and asked. Editor Francis Pharcellus Church's lengthy, touching reply became one of the most reprinted newspaper editorials in US history. "Alas! how dreary would be the world if there were no Santa Claus. It would be as dreary as if there were no Virginias," wrote Church.
KSPavan
Posted: Thursday, September 21, 2017 4:32:03 AM

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This Day in History
"Yes, Virginia, There Is a Santa Claus" Editorial Is Published (1897)
In 1897, eight-year-old Virginia O'Hanlon of New York City asked her father if Santa Claus was real. When he suggested that "if you see it in The Sun, it's so," she wrote to the newspaper and asked. Editor Francis Pharcellus Church's lengthy, touching reply became one of the most reprinted newspaper editorials in US history. "Alas! how dreary would be the world if there were no Santa Claus. It would be as dreary as if there were no Virginias," wrote Church.
ChristopherJohnson
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I still think that Santa Claus is not real, although we may see him in the Sun.
monamagda
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Life After Santa Claus Question

As for the little girl in the story, she grew up and became a teacher. Virginia O'Hanlon earned a master's degree from Columbia University and a doctorate from Fordham University. For many years, she worked as an educator and school administrator. She also married, becoming Virginia O'Hanlon Douglas.

O'Hanlon's famous correspondence followed her throughout her life. It was run in The New York Sun every year from its initial publication until the paper folded in 1949 (the paper's name was revived years later), as well as in countless other publications throughout the years.

In 1959, O'Hanlon moved to North Chatham, New York. In 1966, she was the subject of a tribute by the North Chatham United Methodist Church. At the celebration, O'Hanlon read her letter and Church's response to an enthusiastic crowd.

Death and Legacy

Laura Virginia O'Hanlon Douglas died at the age of 81 on May 13, 1971, in Valatie, New York. She had spent her final years in poor health, living in a nursing home. Her childhood home in New York City became The Studio School. Lifelong teacher O'Hanlon would surely have approved of her old home's new use. In 2009, the school honored O'Hanlon's memory by establishing a scholarship in her name. According to The Studio School's website, the purpose of the scholarship is to "educate children to take their place in the world with integrity, compassion and a lifelong love for learning."

O'Hanlon's grandson, James Temple, told The New York Sun in 2004 that his grandmother didn't think that she'd done anything special. He said that O'Hanlon told him, "All I did was ask the question ... Mr. Church's editorial was so beautiful ...It was Mr. Church who did something wonderful."

https://www.biography.com/people/virginia-ohanlon-273642
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